The Darcys & the Bingleys: Pride and Prejudice Continues

The Darcys & the Bingleys: Pride and Prejudice Continues

3.6 93
by Marsha Altman
     
 

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By turns hilarious and sweet, The Darcys & the Bingleys also presents an intriguing view of Miss Caroline Bingley, who has such good reasons for being the way she is that the reader can't help but hold her in charity.See more details below

Overview

By turns hilarious and sweet, The Darcys & the Bingleys also presents an intriguing view of Miss Caroline Bingley, who has such good reasons for being the way she is that the reader can't help but hold her in charity.

Editorial Reviews

For Immediate Release Reviews
This charming period piece by debut novelist Marsha Altman proves that yes, you can never have too much Darcy and Elizabeth!
— Shaley Melchior
Becky's Book Blog
I will say this, the book is good and well worth reading. The book is true to the original as far as characters and social conventions... well written, true to the book, and entertaining.
— Rebecca Laney
Riley's Reviews
The Darcys and the Bingleys is a sweet, fun, and sparkling homage to Pride and Prejudice that would please even Jane Austen herself.
— Riley MErrick
Good Clean Reads
It was an enjoyable read--it was funny... and kept me turning the pages.
— Kim Izzat
Jane Austen Today
I kept reading the book wanting to find out how the plot would develop. If you simply cannot get enough of Pride and Prejudice's characters, then this book will more than satisfy you.
— Vic Sandborn
BookFoolery
Recommended? Enthusiastically. Honestly, the more I reflect upon this book, the more I love it... Such fun. I laughed. I gasped. I learned to love Caroline Bingley.
— Nancy Horner
Romance Rookie
I would definitely recommend this book to fans of Jane Austin who are clamoring for more.
— Jill Dunlop
Once Upon a Romance
The Darcys and The Bingleys is one of the most enjoyable books, that I have read in ages.
— Connie
Hollywood Today
You'll laugh out loud many times while reading The Darcys & the Bingleys. Altman knows how to keep the plot moving.
— Gabrielle Pantera
Historical Novels Review
Ms. Altman has written an amusing supposition of what might have been.
— Audrey Braver
Stephanies Written Word
I think Altman's The Darcys and The Bingleys has written a fun, witty and ultimately a very satisfying read.
— Stephanie
Bookopolis
Altman's writing is very poetic and she captures the 'Jane Austen' time period quite well with the right tone and use of language.
— Sheri Stock
The Book Zombie
Tthe banter between characters is the absolute highlight of this story.
— Joanne Mosher
From the Publisher
"This charming period piece by debut novelist Marsha Altman proves that yes, you can never have too much Darcy and Elizabeth!" - For Immediate Release Reviews

"I will say this, the book is good and well worth reading. The book is true to the original as far as characters and social conventions... well written, true to the book, and entertaining." - Becky's Book Blog

"The Darcys and the Bingleys is a sweet, fun, and sparkling homage to Pride and Prejudice that would please even Jane Austen herself." - Riley's Reviews

"It was an enjoyable read—it was funny... and kept me turning the pages." - Good Clean Reads

"I kept reading the book wanting to find out how the plot would develop. If you simply cannot get enough of Pride and Prejudice's characters, then this book will more than satisfy you. " - Jane Austen Today

"Recommended? Enthusiastically. Honestly, the more I reflect upon this book, the more I love it... Such fun. I laughed. I gasped. I learned to love Caroline Bingley. " - BookFoolery

"I would definitely recommend this book to fans of Jane Austin who are clamoring for more." - Romance Rookie

"The Darcys and The Bingleys is one of the most enjoyable books, that I have read in ages. " - Once Upon a Romance

"You'll laugh out loud many times while reading The Darcys & the Bingleys. Altman knows how to keep the plot moving. " - Hollywood Today

"Ms. Altman has written an amusing supposition of what might have been. " - Historical Novels Review

"I think Altman's The Darcys and The Bingleys has written a fun, witty and ultimately a very satisfying read." - Stephanies Written Word

"Altman's writing is very poetic and she captures the 'Jane Austen' time period quite well with the right tone and use of language." - Bookopolis

"Tthe banter between characters is the absolute highlight of this story." - The Book Zombie

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402213489
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
09/01/2008
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
716,589
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 7.70(h) x 1.20(d)

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Chapter 1: The Deal

Charles Bingley, a man in possession of fortune and of good standing, had been for several years now in want of a wife. Now he stood at the culmination of his efforts and found it almost alarming.

For the first time in many years, the shooting season had passed, and Charles Bingley didn't give it a second thought. He had to look his best at all times for the numerous guests that were filling his hours. Normally, hosting was something he did gladly, but other forces were pulling him in directions away from his abominable guests and well-wishers.

This must be how Darcy feels all the time, he mused, and allowed himself a rare smile-rare in that it was at the expense of his friend. For he had no doubt that whatever sufferings he was enduring at Netherfield by having the flux of people and priorities keep him from his beloved Jane, Darcy was probably feeling them more, because Darcy went into the intense period of social events with a predisposition against them. As a guest in Bingley's estate, he was normally entitled to all of the privacy he wished and could hide in his room with a pile of books for all Bingley cared. But that was not the case when one was engaged in what was looking to be a rather controversial wedding.

Perhaps controversial was not the right word, but Bingley chose it anyway, at least in his own mind. Certainly, there were those who opposed it, but none that he and Darcy were not willing to stand up to. He could never have imagined his unshakable best friend bending to the will of his aunt and marrying Anne de Bourgh, but then again, he also could never have imagined his friend falling in love with someone deemed below his station by the world at large. If anything, the master of Pemberley was more than aware of his station and the social standing that he was required to maintain, something Bingley would not wish on himself for the doubling of accounts that it would bring.

So, it seemed, life was full of surprises, because Darcy was quite possibly more in love with Elizabeth than Bingley was with Jane, even if he was being subtle about it and apparently had been since the moment they met. Only after much teasing and a persevering interrogation did Fitzwilliam Darcy admit to falling in love with her at first sight, of all places and times, and he only admitted it with a passion in his eyes that indicated that, if Charles Bingley were not his best friend and companion, he would be inclined to thrash him with his walking stick for asking such a question.

But even all of his purported and very real hauteur and intimidating posture and grace could not save poor Mr. Darcy from the necessities of prenuptial social business. There were the trips to Longbourn that were not frequent enough and the various well-wishers (and non-well-wishers) streaming into Netherfield that were all too frequent. He also had to travel to London no less than three times in a month for reasons of finance management and general legal wedding preparations. Bingley, a man of smaller fortune, only had to go once and entrusted to his steward that all the rest would be well.

In fact, it had reached such an extreme that standing in his room, waiting for the appearance of his waistcoat, Charles Bingley could not think of two or three words he had spoken to Darcy in the past day, despite living under the same roof. Not that he was totally unaccustomed to absences, and not that he was helpless without the person whom he would never bring himself to call-to his face, anyway-a sort of elder brother, but he could think of no better way to idle away the time which they were forced to be away from their respective fiancées by social circumstance than talking, even if it was idle chatter that would result in Bingley quite knowingly running his mouth off and Darcy impatiently rolling his eyes. That, at least, would be a bit relaxing in its own way.

No, there would be no return to normalcy. In three days, they would no longer be eligible bachelors who were the talk of every ball. Bingley's beloved sister would no longer be batting her eyelashes at his best friend (or, at least, Bingley hoped she wouldn't), and he would not be returning the favour with dismissive witticisms. All right, Bingley admitted he was a bit oblivious at times, but he was not dim-witted, even if he had missed Darcy's obsession with Elizabeth Bennet. But then again, everyone had missed that, probably including Darcy himself. Darcy was jubilant when writing to his sister of the arrangement, and he took great pains to make his face even more unreadable than usual when he gave the grave news to Caroline Bingley. It was a masterpiece of a performance and went well with Charles's considerable relief that he didn't have to do it himself. All cousins, sisters, distant relatives, attendants, hired planners, paperwork officials, and local guests made two matters particularly vexing for the normally unvexible Charles Bingley. First, and most obviously, despite the many trips to Longbourn, he could not get nearly as much time with Jane as he would have liked, but he was assured that he had the rest of his life to make up for it. The second matter was more pressing, if less emotionally invested: he needed Darcy, alone.

It took him several weeks to admit even to himself that he had questions that were better answered before the wedding and that Darcy was the best person to answer them. He was lacking a father-though that would have been an awkward situation anyway-and Mr. Hurst was, he decided, with all of his good manners and intentions, the last person he wanted to ask. That left his friend, confidant, and evermore-experienced-at-everything brother figure. If he could just get him alone long enough to properly work up the courage to ask the appropriate questions, then all would be well. Darcy wouldn't answer, of course. He would look indignant and find some reason to stomp off or find no reason at all and still stomp off. Or maybe, maybe, he would actually have some advice that could be pried out with excessive trying.

And Bingley was ready to try.

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