Daring American Heroes of Flight: Nine Brave Fliers

Daring American Heroes of Flight: Nine Brave Fliers

by Jennifer Reed
     
 

There was a time when people were in a race to be first in the skies with a reliable and controllable way to fly. Once in the air, more frontiers were left to conquer. From crossing the oceans and landing on the moon, to overcoming gender and racial bias, there have been pilots who rose to these challenges, no matter the odds. Learn the life stories and amazing

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Overview

There was a time when people were in a race to be first in the skies with a reliable and controllable way to fly. Once in the air, more frontiers were left to conquer. From crossing the oceans and landing on the moon, to overcoming gender and racial bias, there have been pilots who rose to these challenges, no matter the odds. Learn the life stories and amazing deeds of nine daring heroes.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Amy Sisson
This new series highlights visionary figures and their contributions to science, research, and exploration. Daring American Heroes of Flight begins with the Wright Brothers and follows a chronological path covering aviation pioneers, including Bessie Coleman, Amelia Earhart, Neil Armstrong, and Sally Ride. Similarly, Inspiring African-American Inventors focuses on well-known African American visionaries, such as George Washington Carver, and lesser-known but important figures such as Jan E. Matzeliger, who invented the automated shoe-lasting machine, and Madam C. J. Walker, who developed a line of haircare products specifically for African Americans and became the first self-made female African American millionaire. The series, which also includes Brilliant African-American Scientists: Nine Exceptional Lives and Astonishing Ancient World Scientists: Eight Great Brains, follows a consistent format, with ten- to sixteen-page profiles covering the subject's early days, influences, and lasting contributions to his or her particular field. Each profile includes an individual "lifeline" chronology; photographs and other eye-catching graphics; and Web-site screenshots, some of which can be accessed via the publisher's MyReportLinks.com, whereas others must be accessed directly. Overall this series largely succeeds in providing information that is both useful and appealing. The publisher identifies the books as appropriate for sixth grade and up, but an upper limit of eighth or ninth grade would have been appropriate, as these books are too basic for most high school students. In addition, the labeling of Web sites as "approved" may be misleading to any student whose teacher has disallowed the use of the Internet for a given assignment. Nonetheless these books are useful and are to be commended for the diversity of subjects covered. As such, this series certainly belongs in middle school, junior high school, and public libraries. Reviewer: Amy Sisson
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
What a refreshing look at brave flyers—women and African-Americans are featured more than white males, which, while it is not really representative of the field, offers inspiration for all. The story starts with the Wright brothers, and their story is pretty familiar. Next, Bessie Coleman is featured. Coleman was an African-American woman who had to go to France to learn to fly and who eventually had her own air show in 1922. She became know as Queen Bess or Brave Bessie. Charles Lindberg and Amelia Earhart endured considerable hardship as they strove and succeeded in flying solo across the Atlantic. The story of Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., was not as familiar to this reviewer, but in addition to being a brave and courageous flyer, he also faced discrimination with even greater courage and fortitude. The picture of him getting his fourth star in 1998 is memorable. No book about heroic flyers would be complete without mention of Neil Armstrong, who was the first man to set foot on the moon. For women, Sally Ride is a true model—she has a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford, was the first woman in space, and was followed by another great role model, Eileen Collins, who became the first woman to pilot a space shuttle. Their stories are inspirational. The timeline that run across the opening pages of each chapter marks major milestones in each of their careers. The text is laid out with inset boxes from www.myreportlinks.com as well as other photographs and drawings. It is a bit busy, but today's kids seem to deal with these layouts more easily than adults. One spread recaps the many internet links associated with the information in the book. There is a glossary, chapter notes, and anindex. This book is part of the "Great Scientists and Famous Inventors" series. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8–These eclectic collective biographies cover eight or nine scientists each. The 10-to-15-page entries include basic personal information but concentrate on career achievements, such as Al-Khwarizmi's documentation of practical uses of algebra (Ancient World Scientists) and George Washington Carver's work on crop rotation (African-American Inventors). An important aspect of each entry is the list of relevant Web sites that can be accessed through the publisher's site and that will be maintained until at least 2014. Overall, this series provides some solid information about well-known and lesser-known individuals important in their fields.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781598450811
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/01/2009
Series:
Great Scientists and Famous Inventors Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
11 - 17 Years

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