Dark Ages II : When the Digital Data Die

Dark Ages II : When the Digital Data Die

by Bryan P. Bergeron
     
 
  • Civilization at risk: Is our most important information about to vanish?
  • Here today, gone tomorrow: Disappearing Web sites, unproven storage technologies, obsolete data formats
  • Specific, realistic solutions for individuals, organizations, and society

Your data—and everyone's—is in danger. Discover

Overview

  • Civilization at risk: Is our most important information about to vanish?
  • Here today, gone tomorrow: Disappearing Web sites, unproven storage technologies, obsolete data formats
  • Specific, realistic solutions for individuals, organizations, and society

Your data—and everyone's—is in danger. Discover why—and what to do about it!

Dark Ages II shows why our data is at far greater risk than we've ever imagined—and envisions a frightening future, where so much critical information is lost that civilization itself could collapse. Bryan Bergeron examines how we're storing our most precious data: on Web sites and email servers that could disappear tomorrow; on unproven magnetic and optical media; and in document formats that become obsolete virtually overnight. After projecting the potential impact of massive data loss, Bergeron offers step-by-step techniques you can use to solve the problem in your own home, organization, or enterprise.

  • Why your disks aren't as reliable as you think
  • Who owns your data—and what happens when they stop taking care of it?
  • What's happening to civilization's "paper trail"?
  • Why backups aren't nearly enough
  • Why "pervasive computing" will only make the problems worse
  • What you can do now to ensure the survival of your digital information—and everyone's

This book is a powerful wake-up call for everyone who depends on digital data, including business decision-makers, educators, librarians, researchers, public policy-makers—and you!

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
From your PC to some corporation's faceless mainframe, from yesterday's credit card records to tomorrow's most profound works of art, our lives and societies are increasingly bound up in tangled, scattered webs of data. Will that data survive? Will it remain accessible? What happens if it doesn't? What happens to you? What happens to civilization?

Bryan Bergeron takes on these big questions in Dark Ages II, and his answers will unsettle you. Hard drives fail, CD-Rs deteriorate (and nobody really knows how long today's technologies will last). Web sites go offline (who's responsible for preserving information that's stored on the Net, anyhow?) Formats become obsolete (try reading your old Commodore 64 disks nowadays. Are you sure you'll have a Zip drive in ten years?). Simply put, your data -- and nearly everyone's -- is more fragile than you'd like to believe.

The solution isn't a return to paper: it's careful planning. There are people and organizations who do archiving right. Bergeron shows you how to become one of them -- offering practical plans for preserving your information whether you're an individual graphic artist, a small business, or a retiring CEO. You'll be glad you followed his advice. So will your descendants. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer with nearly 20 years' experience in helping technology companies deploy and market advanced software, computing, and networking products and services. He served for nearly ten years as vice president of a New Jersey–based marketing company, where he supervised a wide range of graphics and web design projects. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

Contending that the reliance on digital data storage threatens civilization itself, Bergeron describes ways of protecting important data for businesses, libraries, and individuals. Coverage includes, for example, the transmission of knowledge throughout history, the information technology infrastructure, the psychological significance of nontangible documents, and the economics of network-based data storage. Computer consultant Bergeron teaches at Harvard Medical School and at MIT. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780130661074
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
09/25/2001
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.04(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

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