Dark Coulee

( 6 )

Overview

Claire Watkins, deputy sheriff of Pepin County, Wis., makes a strong second showing that ought to gain her new fans. In spite of recurrent panic attacks associated with the death of her husband, Claire is starting to find the peace and security she's been seeking for herself and her 10-year-old daughter, Meg, since leaving her promising career with the St. Paul-Minneapolis police department for the small bluff town of St. Antoine.

One summer evening, while her sister Bridget ...

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Dark Coulee

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Overview

Claire Watkins, deputy sheriff of Pepin County, Wis., makes a strong second showing that ought to gain her new fans. In spite of recurrent panic attacks associated with the death of her husband, Claire is starting to find the peace and security she's been seeking for herself and her 10-year-old daughter, Meg, since leaving her promising career with the St. Paul-Minneapolis police department for the small bluff town of St. Antoine.

One summer evening, while her sister Bridget takes care of Meg, Claire and Rich Haggard, a local pheasant farmer she's been dating for three months, attend a street dance in nearby Little Rock. Just as the fun gets under way, screams for help stop the music and put romance on hold. Someone has stabbed well-liked farmer Jed Spitzler in the chest. Members of the close-knit St. Antoine community join Jed's children in searching for Jed's killer.

Long-hidden town secrets are revealed as Claire seeks the truth and continues to struggle with her own demons.

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Editorial Reviews

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Logue's novels are worth waiting for, Rich in detail and deep characterizations, they reflect a poet's sensibility.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Claire Watkins, deputy sheriff of Pepin County, Wis., makes a strong second showing (after 1999's Blood Country) that ought to gain her new fans. In spite of recurrent panic attacks associated with the death of her husband, Claire is starting to find the peace and security she's been seeking for herself and her 10-year-old daughter, Meg, since leaving her promising career with the St. Paul-Minneapolis police department for the small bluff town of St. Antoine. One summer evening, while her sister Bridget takes care of Meg, Claire and Rich Haggard, a local pheasant farmer she's been dating for three months, attend a street dance in nearby Little Rock. Just as the fun gets under way, screams for help stop the music and put romance on hold. Someone has stabbed well-liked farmer Jed Spitzler in the chest. Members of the close-knit St. Antoine community join Jed's children in searching for Jed's killer. Long-hidden town secrets are revealed as Claire seeks the truth and continues to struggle with her own demons. Logue uses her talents as a poet to depict smalltown life and give rich insights into the hearts of her characters, from the kindly retired school teacher, Ella Gunderson, to the troubled children of Jed Spitzler. Claire performs her duties with intelligence, skill and caring, and readers are left at the conclusion only wanting more. Agent, Jane Chelius. (Nov.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
All set for a romantic evening with her new beau, Claire Watkins, single mom and a deputy sheriff of Pepin County, WI (Blood Country), finds that murder interrupts even the best-laid plans. Whoever killed Jed Spitzler took advantage of a noisy, dark, and crowded annual small-town street dance, which provides opportunity for a multitude of suspects--including two of Spitzler's own children and the jealous ex-boyfriend of his would-be fianc e. Claire sorts through clues while balancing time with her young daughter and jeopardizing the aforesaid love interest. Generally well written, with a nicely crafted plot; for larger collections. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-Deputy Sheriff Claire Watkins and her 10-year-old daughter Meg are still adjusting to their new life in Fort St. Antoine, WI, when a local farmer, Jed Spitzler, is murdered. Claire finds his three children to be hiding lots of family secrets, which must be ferreted out gently but diligently, and with a great deal of patience. Evidence points to the fact that their mother's death, denoted as an accident at the time, was murder, and to Jed as the perpetrator. Plus, it is revealed that Jed had been molesting his oldest daughter, Jenny. Although the physical abuse isn't discussed in detail, Logue paints a detailed portrait of a young woman who uses drugs and alcohol to hide her pain, shame, and humiliation. With much twisting and rearranging, the murder is solved and Claire begins to recover from her husband's death and past events in her life as well. Logue smoothly carries readers into the hearts and minds of these characters. She just as easily transfers the focus of the story centered on the Spitzler family to the minor plots surrounding Claire's life, and the action never stops. Young adults who enjoy J. A. Jance's series featuring Sheriff Joanna Brady will like this series as well.-Pam Johnson, Fairfax County Public Library, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Memories of the deaths of her husband and her former partner are giving former Twin Cities police officer Claire Watkins (Blood Country, 1999, etc.) panic attacks as she tackles her new job as Deputy Sheriff of Pepin County, Wisconsin. She's reluctant to tell her new boyfriend Rich Haggard, a pheasant breeder, about her visits to a therapist, but is happy to accompany him to Little Rock's annual street dance. It's there that widowed farmer Jed Spitzler is found stabbed to death in the middle of the party, leaving teenaged daughters Nora and Jenny and son Brad parentless. Their mother Rainey had died four years ago in a gruesome accident . . . or was it an accident? The answer is essential in solving Spitzler's murder, especially after Pit Snyder, the town's beloved mayor, is arrested for the crime. In due time, Claire finally faces up to the truth about her own past, even as she helps Jenny fight drug addiction and puts Spitzler's killer behind bars. Convincing characters, a believable plot, and writing that can be downright lyrical make Logue's fourth absorbing all the way—her best to date.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440554025
  • Publisher: F & W Media Inc
  • Publication date: 7/28/2011
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 631,843
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.51 (d)

Read an Excerpt



Chapter One


LOVE is a strange flower that blooms in drought, in despair, even in darkness. As Claire dressed for the street dance, she thought about love and wondered if that was what she was feeling.

    She had been seeing Rich Haggard for over three months, but it wasn't moving very fast. Their courtship had the feel of a slow, courteous country romance. They saw each other once or twice a week. He would come over for dinner; she would stop by for coffee. They had gone to two movies, even went bowling once. That night they had taken Claire's ten-year-old daughter, Meg, with them.

    Meg was part of the problem. Actually, Claire didn't see it as a problem. The slowness of their dating suited her fine. Claire didn't want Rich to stay over when Meg was at the house; at least not yet. And Claire couldn't stay at Rich's house because she didn't want to hire a baby-sitter for the whole night. The small town of Fort St. Antoine was gossiping enough about her, a deputy, going out with the pheasant farmer, without giving them more to work with.

    That's what made this night special. Meg had gone to stay with Bridget, Claire's sister. Rich would pick her up in fifteen minutes. They hadn't really talked about it, but Claire was pretty sure that they would spend the night together. What a perfect evening for love. Unlike the climate in which she and Rich had met—one of the worst seasons of Claire's entire life.

    The late-August air smelled sweet with clover and roses. The moon would be full tonight, and the sun wouldn't set until after eight o'clock. Thewarm air felt soft against her skin as she walked out the back door and looked up at the bluff.

    Someone else might find it oppressive to live in the shadow of the bluff, but she loved this three-hundred-foot-tall sloping wall of limestone, covered most of the way up with red cedar, birch, black walnut, and sumac. It lifted out of the field behind her house, and she felt sheltered by it. This whole Mississippi River valley had a warmer, softer feel to it, sitting on the eastern edge of the plains.

    Claire felt ready to move forward with Rich. He was on the quiet side, but stir into him a little, and you found humor and cleverness. And, she suspected, passion.

    It had been a long time since she had slept with anyone. Her husband had died a year and a half ago, and she had only slept with one man once since then. That had been a mistake—one she would never forget. That was one of the reasons why this slowness with Rich felt so comfortable to her. He seemed like a man who could bide his time.

    Claire walked back into the house and looked at herself in the mirror by the back door. She had done the best she could with the materials at hand. She laughed. That was her mother's voice coming out in her. Such a practical woman. She missed her. Claire twirled in front of her reflection, and her hair lifted off her neck.


Rich looked down at his cowboy boots, good old shit-kickers that they were, and wondered if he could dance in the things. He wondered if he could dance, period. Would Claire want to dance? He supposed so. And the idea of holding her in his arms, even in a crowd of loud, drunken people, took his breath away.

    He had wanted to hold her since he had met her. Lately, he'd felt like he was about to explode if he couldn't touch her. On this warm, humid summer night, he wanted his skin to melt into hers. He wanted to kiss her neck, put a hand on the small of her back, and spin her around the world. Hell, maybe he would be able to dance after all.

    He had polished his boots, and he thought they looked pretty good. Good old Stewart cowboy boots. Like him, they were well worn but comfortable, but with a little polish, they could shine. He knew that Meg was staying at Bridget's; Claire had let that slip out when they talked earlier. He would invite her to stay the night. That way his car wouldn't be sitting in front of her house come the morning light. He had changed the sheets on the bed, cleaned up the bathroom, even scoured the tub, and bought some rolls for breakfast from Stuart's bakery.

    He knew that they had been smart to move so slowly, but it had been damned hard on him. When they had first started going out, he had really been careful with her, after all she'd been through, but he'd found her as resilient as they come. Meg wasn't the spunky little ten-year-old girl she was for no good reason.

    Rich looked at the clock. He'd told her he would pick her up at seven. Ten minutes away, and he was ready. He walked out the front door and stretched his arms up to the heavens in the front yard. The moon would rise up full tonight. A real harvest moon, red with the rays of the setting sun. Blood red. It would be a beauty. Tonight, he was sure, would be a night he would never forget.


Jed Spitzler stood in the doorway and looked out over his land—ripe, golden heads turned toward the rising sun—forty acres of sunflowers. He had taken a risk, but it had worked out, and this fall he would reap the rewards.

    Some of the other farmers had laughed at him while putting their fields in the same old crops: corn, alfalfa, soybeans. But he had wanted to try something different.

    He knew he appeared a quiet, conservative man, but there was a side to him that few people knew about. Better that way.

    How had Lola talked him into going to this stupid dance? He'd rather stay home and drink a beer or two and watch TV, but she had made him promise. The older kids were going too. Nora would stay home. He didn't want her shuffling about a dance like that. Who knows the trouble she might get into? At twelve, she was old enough to stay home alone. When he was a kid, his mom had left him and his brother alone when they were eight and four. They made out okay.

    People babied their kids so much these days. Didn't sit well with him. He told his children they had to pull their own weight, do their chores, and help around the house.

    When he thought of Lola, he realized he was tiring of her. At first she had seemed very agreeable, would do anything for him, but lately she had become more demanding. He had already had a wife once; he didn't need another one.

    Nora came to the door. "Whatcha looking at, Dad?"

    "The crop."

    She spun around and threw her hands out toward the fields, then smiled up at him. "All the sunflowers?"

    "Yes. Come here."

    She came to him, and he pulled her up against his waist, wrapping an arm around her chest and stroking her golden hair. She was his baby girl, but she was getting bigger every day.


Riding in the truck, Claire felt awkward with Rich. She couldn't seem to think of anything to say. She hadn't told him that she had started seeing a therapist. Every time she opened her mouth to mention it, she could think of no way to lead into it. If she told him about the therapist, she would have to tell him about the panic attacks. She didn't want to scare him away with her fears.

    They had turned toward Little Rock. The land rolled in green hillocks around them. The bluffs fell away here, and the river would glimmer, then disappear behind the pine trees. It seemed a different landscape from her place in Fort St. Antoine —more bucolic, more intimate—as the bluffline softened.

    "How's work?" Rich asked.

    "I like my new job as investigator with the department. It's been a quiet week. We had two drunks in the tank and a hit-and-run driver last night."

    "I heard somebody got burglarized down in Nelson."

    "That's right. Back door was open. They walked in and took a couple guns and a microwave and a case of beer."

    Rich started laughing. "Quite a haul."

    "Yeah, probably some kids. Don't like the idea of them getting some rifles, but firearms are easy enough to come by around here. I've never lived in a place before where the kids get out of school for deer-hunting season. Certainly says something about the priorities of their parents."

    Rich didn't say anything for a moment, then he said quietly, "Hunting isn't so bad."

    "I'm not saying anything against hunting. I think a walk in the woods under any circumstances is probably a good thing. But compared to a week of school? Take the kids out hunting on the weekend. Plus the idea that twelve-year-old boys and girls can be tromping through the woods with guns in their hands, shooting at anything that moves, scares me. Meg doesn't get to go anyplace that week. She can stay at home and read."

    "I could take her hunting."

    "Are you purposely missing the point of what I'm saying here?"

    "Yup." He smiled over at her.

    "She would do anything with you. She adores you. It kind of worries me."

    Rich slowed down as they approached the town. "Hey, her dad died. Every little kid needs a guy in their lives. I'm not a bad guy. Plus, could be she's glad to see her mom happy again."

    Claire blushed and looked down at her lap. "That's gotta be it."

    Little Rock was a small town built on the north side of the Chippewa River. It was on the way to nowhere, and there wasn't much in the town: a couple of bars, a gas station, a small grocery store, and a feed store. But once a year, it exploded. The town threw a great street dance, and everyone came from the whole county and beyond.

    Cars and pickup trucks lined the main street of this 134-person town. The street had been blocked off, so Rich pulled behind the gas station and parked in the weeds.

    He turned off the truck and put his hand on Claire's shoulder. "You seem a little edgy. Are you trying to pick a fight?"

    "Maybe."

    "Why?"

    "Nervous."

    "What you need is a beer."

    "A beer might help."


Rich felt the eyes on Claire. Other men taking barbed looks at her, wanting to reel her in. She looked gorgeous tonight. Gorgeous was exactly the right word for her. She was wearing a sleeveless cotton shirt that was cut low. Like a fruit that had ripened to perfection, her skin looked lush. Her jeans fit her to a T. Her hair was loose and full around her freckled face, and she was wearing ruby lipstick.

    As they walked up to the street dance, Rich recognized a few neighbors. He and Claire couldn't go many feet without saying howdy to someone. The strains of the old rock and roll tune "Roll Over, Beethoven" floated down the street from the band at the far end.

    About three hundred people of all ages were dancing in the street or watching from the sidewalks. People had brought their own lawn chairs and coolers. The two bars in town—Porky's and the Riverside—were selling all sorts of food from stands outside their establishments: cheese curds, barbecue sandwiches, hot dogs, grilled chicken. Porky's had kegs out in front of the bar, and bartenders were serving the lines of people just as fast as they could. For many people in the area, this was the big summer celebration.

    When they got close to it, they could see the street dance was in full swing. "Hank Texaco and the Gas Guzzlers," according to the banner hanging over their heads, were playing, whipping the crowd into a dancing frenzy. The sun had set, and the afterglow lit up the clouds into cotton-candy colors.

    Near the stage everyone was dancing: eighty-year-old women with ten-year-old boys, older couples who had been dancing together for forty years, and teenagers who flailed around and danced in clusters.

    Rich maneuvered Claire up to one of the kegs in front of Porky's and bought them each a beer. A tall, dark-haired man bumped into Rich, making him slosh some beer on his shirtfront. When he turned to see who it was, Rich recognized Jed Spitzler.

    "Sorry," Jed said.

    "Hey, Jed."

    "Rich. How're your pheasant doing?"

    "Getting nice and plump. What're you raising this year?"

    "I'm trying my hand at sunflowers."

    "Maybe I'll buy some as feed."

    "No, these are high quality. They're for human consumption, not animals. I aim at getting top buck a bushel."

    Rich introduced him to Claire and noticed that Jed looked her up and down.

    "Looks like you've got some spunk in you," Jed said, staring at her breasts.

    Rich didn't like the tone in his voice, but he figured the guy must be loaded already to talk like that.

    "Let me buy you another beer," Jed said.

    "Forget it. This shirt needed a wash anyway."

    Jed laughed, nodded good-bye, and walked off.

    When Claire took a swig of beer, she took a healthy swig. Rich could tell she was relaxing. In the truck, she had seemed all wound up tight, and Rich wondered how the night would play out. Claire would think back to this moment with Jed Spitzler over the weeks to come. What she would remember about him is that he stood tall and straight. His hair was dark but thinning. And his blue jeans were pressed. She assumed some woman was taking good care of him. She was wrong.

    She wished she would have noticed him better, but she was focused on Rich. The beer he bought her tasted good. It made her feel giddy.

    "Thanks for not telling him that I'm a cop."

    "Sure. Why's that?"

    "Sometimes I don't feel like being one."

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent mystery and family drama

    Claire and her daughter Meg have known much sorrow in recent years. A drug lord killed her spouse. Later on, she learned her partner and lover was the murderer. She killed him in self-defense, but never revealed his sordid past to anyone. Her lie of omission eats at Claire, especially since she is seeing pheasant farmer Rich Haggard, a man she dearly loves. <P> Rich and Claire are enjoying a pleasant evening together in Little Rock, attending a street dance, when someone knifes Jed Spitzler with his two children nearby. Claire changes from being on a date to a deputy sheriff taking care of the crime scene and trying to save Jed¿s life. He dies at the hospital, leaving Claire with a homicide investigation to undertake. As Claire digs into the case, she realizes the roots of the motive lies in the past that the Spitzler family refuses to divulge to her. <P>Mary Logue has simultaneously written a powerful family drama with a strong mystery. Ms. Logue exquisitely develops both subplots with neither shortchanged and ultimately they merge into a dramatic climax. This is a story about people and why they do things that is often ugly. The novel is also about life in a tiny town (population under 400) where everyone knows everyone on a first name basis. DARK COULEE uses the who-done-it to blend the present with the past, but it is Ms. Logue¿s literary abilities that turns this book into a sure shot winner for anyone who relishes a superior family-driven mystery. <P>Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2014

    Predictable

    Though this book is far better than the first in the Claire Watkins series, I find it to be very predictable. It folloes the same tired old format. Be that as it may, I will continue to read this series. I think maybe Mary Logue is just starting to become a better author and I want to give her a chance. Stephanie Clanahan

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    Posted December 9, 2012

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    Posted May 5, 2012

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    Posted February 25, 2013

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    Posted June 18, 2012

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