Dark Enough to See the Stars in a Jamestown Sky by Connie Lapallo | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Dark Enough to See the Stars in a Jamestown Sky

Dark Enough to See the Stars in a Jamestown Sky

4.4 11
by Connie Lapallo
     
 

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Few women and children sailed to Jamestown in 1609. But to Joan, prosperity in Virginia sounded promising. Then she learned she would have to leave a daughter behind in England. Even that Joan could bear. But a hurricane at sea, the Starving Time, Indian Wars... Jamestown in 1609 was nothing as she imagined.

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Overview

Few women and children sailed to Jamestown in 1609. But to Joan, prosperity in Virginia sounded promising. Then she learned she would have to leave a daughter behind in England. Even that Joan could bear. But a hurricane at sea, the Starving Time, Indian Wars... Jamestown in 1609 was nothing as she imagined.

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Editorial Reviews

Maggie Hall
"Rich characters set against the brutal background of the Starving Time."
Lucinda Whitehurst
“Lapallo’s book is hugely successful in capturing her character’s feelings and motivations. Readers know these characters as people because Lapallo has come to know them.”
Karen Rogers
“The quest to understand her grandmother....would lead Lapallo to Joan’s native England and the writing of [this book]....A tale of tested faith, courage, friendship, and the refusal of some hardy souls ever to capitulate.”
Lauren Wicks
“John Smith. Powhatan. John Rolfe. With the exception of one particularly infamous Indian princess--Pocahontas--the mention of the Jamestown colony brings to mind the work and the history of its men. Yet, Lapallo is helping to change that."
Amy Jo Martin
The result of Lapallo's hard work is a fictitious story smartly intertwined with historic facts....From the very first page of 'Jamestown Sky,' the reader is aware of Lapallo's personal investment in making the story historically accurate and beautiful...Lapallo has said that while researching Cecily and Joan, she heard their voices saying, 'Do not forget us.' Because of her well-crafted rendition of the life of Joan Phippen Peirce, I don't think that readers ever will."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781595264213
Publisher:
Media Creations
Publication date:
07/25/2006
Pages:
324
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.74(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author

Connie Lapallo is the author of DARK ENOUGH TO SEE THE STARS IN A JAMESTOWN SKY, a novel based on the true story of the women and children at Jamestown. Amongst these early women and girls were Connie’s 12th great-grandmother, Cecily, as well as Joan, the woman Connie believes to be Cecily’s mother.

Connie has thus far spent 13 years writing and researching her trilogy while also homeschooling her four children (two of whom are now in college).

A Virginia native, Connie has a degree in Finance from Virginia Tech and an MBA
from the University of Georgia. She was first professionally published at 16 as a reporter for the Richmond News Leader and has also been a tour guide at Berkeley Plantation.

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Dark Enough to See the Stars in a Jamestown Sky 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was blown away by this one! The research Ms. Lapallo must have done is phenomenal. The story is so real, I feel I've lived it. This beautifully written historical novel will take you back to a time in our history that will fascinate any reader and make them more aware of what the men, women, and children went through to settle in the New World. Then Ms. Lapallo didn't waste any of her research. She included a section in the back that reveals a plethora of information including which parts of the story were actual historical fact, maps, a list of the people and what eventually happened to them, a list of the native tribes that existed in that period, a glossary of terms used that may be unfamiliar to us today, an actual letter penned by one of the settlers in 1629, and a chart showing how Ms. Lapallo is related to the main character, Joan Phippen Peirce.
Frazzled_Cat More than 1 year ago
An exceptional way to learn history!  I was afraid the book would be a difficult read, based on previous history books I had read.  I was totally wrong! I could hardly put the book down, if I could have gone without eating, sleeping, or working, I would have.  I recommend it to all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Connie Lapallo set out to be historically accurate with the retelling of her 13th great-grandmother's story, and she succeeds with flying colors. (I know the people at Jamestown who proof-read her manuscript for accuracy.) I could sink into the story and absorb the impact of what the early settlers at Jamestown accomplished, secure that there was little to no literary license. And what a compelling story it is. I found I was able to laugh and cry and feel despair and joy along with the characters. The 17th century settlers to Jamestown were very religious, and Ms Lapallo carries that theme through in a way that 21st century readers can recognize, as Joan discovers the power of simple, personal prayers as part of her spiritual dialogue with God. It is a very believable insight into what kept these amazing people going in the face of such staggering obstacles. The story is inspiring and humbling and memorable.
smarieb More than 1 year ago
Lapallo's fictionalized account of the settlers at Jamestown was a delight to read. I learned much more than I anticipated and, yet, remained entertained throughout. The writing style flowed nicely; chapters were brief. I enjoyed the characters immensely. I like knowing learning about strong women in a time when many were thought to be weak.

A quick and easy read. Not something I would normally choose for myself, but this was a gift happily read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a young student, I did not appreciate my History classes. You know why? They were too BORING! Too many names, dates, and disjointed facts that had to be regurgitated in an exact fashion in order to boost up my GPA. I wish all History books were written like Ms. Lapallo's book. The historical facts are beautifully woven into the mostly historical story. And because of the story format I found myself living, grieving, and surviving with these colonists. There were so many tidbits that made the story real for me. Because of the rich detail, I felt as if I had been on those ships, being hurled about the ocean during a hurricane. And I felt genuine grief at the thought of all these women mourning for the missing ship. Grief, as SO many men and women perished from disease, hunger, or Indian attack. This is also a very well researched book. There is a section at the end of the book that explains what is fact, and what is fiction, with charts that tell what happened to each Jamestown survivor. Other pages detailed the main character's ancestry, going from the mid 1500's to present day, and including Ms. Lapallo's own children. What did I like best about this book? ... I loved that I learned more about Jamestown and the colonial period by reading this book, than I did in all my formal educational experience! So why can't more books be written this way?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I finished this book last night, and I have to say that today I'm still thinking about it. Some of the genealogy got a bit cumbersome, but once I got into it I found myself reading 'just one more chapter'. While I was familiar with many of the events and people in the Jamestown saga from my own research, the details in this story captured me and made my heart ache. How wonderful for the author to know her history with such detail. I'm so glad that she shared her story with the rest of us.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am so sad that I finished this book. It was so good, I could have read on and on. I hear that a sequel is in the making, so I wait for that! I am so grateful to her for stating what was fiction in the book. Having met the author in August at a conference, I was excited to read her book. And Arlington County Library has bought it for their collection!
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