Dark Inheritance by W. Michael Gear, Kathleen O'Neal Gear |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Dark Inheritance

Dark Inheritance

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by W. Michael Gear, Kathleen O'Neal Gear
     
 

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After being asked to study Umber, a bonobo chimpanzee, Dr Jim Dutton begins to expect that his primate pupil has been genetically altered and joins forces with Canadian journalist Valerie Radin to uncover the truth.

Overview

After being asked to study Umber, a bonobo chimpanzee, Dr Jim Dutton begins to expect that his primate pupil has been genetically altered and joins forces with Canadian journalist Valerie Radin to uncover the truth.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
The Gears tap into some of our primal fears--and today's headlines--with the story of an anthropology professor who has volunteered to raise a chimpanzee in his home. He soon suspects that the amazingly bright chimp has been genetically altered. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Adult/High School-The 21st century meets H. G. Wells's The Island of Doctor Moreau and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in this latest venture by the Gears. The length may seem daunting, but a few pages should be enough to capture the attention of most scientific-fiction lovers. Anthropologist Dr. Jim Dutton has raised a Bonobo pygmy chimpanzee for the past 12 years alongside his 13-year-old daughter, Brett, as part of a research project for pharmaceutical giant SAC (Smyth-Archer Chemists). As it turns out, Umber not only knows sign language, but she can also read, speak through a computerized voice synthesizer, and write. Even more alarmingly, she ponders God, her soul, and the consequences of actions. Dutton fudges results to SAC for fear of losing the animal to experimentation if her true abilities were known. Worried, he consults an old friend and colleague to determine why Umber seems so mysteriously human, and those inquiries bring the attention of SAC on his family and friends. In their attempt to keep Umber as part of their family, Dutton, Brett, and her estranged mother (a well-known investigative reporter) end up in Africa, battling for their survival against an insane blue-eyed ape and the greedy director willing to kill to preserve the SAC financial empire and the secrecy of the ape project. The action-packed story is fascinating, but its real value is the questions it poses, including: Does one have to be a "human" to be a "person?"-Carol DeAngelo, Kings Park Library, Burke, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Heartfelt story about an ape raised to human intelligence. The Gears are best-known for their earlier archeological novels, usually about the First North Americans (The Visitant, 1999), though this time out they choose a subject that would appeal to the Steven Spielberg, who not only made E.T. but adapted Michael Crichton's dino novels. SAC, a British pharmaceuticals firm, searching for an HIV antivirus, has given apes human antibodies to make them good test subjects. Later developments lead to an amazing leap in intelligence, raising some test anthropoids to hominid status. Umber, a bonobo ape, is raised from birth with anthropology professor Dr. Jim Sutton's daughter Brett, a girl Umber's age. Umber speaks with a Stephen Hawking—like mechanical voice, wonders about God, etc. Then the chimp must be introduced to the wilds of Africa, where the Duttons find SAC far outstripping Umber as a test subject. Once again, first-rate storytelling from this immensely prolific team. Author tour; TV satellite tour

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446610964
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
06/01/2002
Pages:
576
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 6.75(h) x 1.00(d)

What People are saying about this

Douglas Preston
A truly fascinating story with all the heart-pounding experiment of Michael Crichton's work.
— (Douglas Preston, bestselling co-author of Riptide and The Ice Limit)

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