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Dark Night
     

Dark Night

by Dorothee De Monfreid
 

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Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf . . . tiger . . . and crocodile?!

Little Felix is all alone, walking home through the forest when he hears a spooky howling and spots a wolf approaching! His luck turns from bad to worse when a tiger scares away the wolf and a crocodile scares away the tiger! Can something as small as a rabbit help Felix scare away

Overview

Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf . . . tiger . . . and crocodile?!

Little Felix is all alone, walking home through the forest when he hears a spooky howling and spots a wolf approaching! His luck turns from bad to worse when a tiger scares away the wolf and a crocodile scares away the tiger! Can something as small as a rabbit help Felix scare away the wild things prowling the woods? This empowering picture book is perfect for any child who’s ever wanted to turn the tables on scary beasts lurking at night.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
How do you escape a wolf, a tiger and a crocodile when you’re alone in a forest at night? Wide-eyed Felix retreats into a hollow tree; a stairway leads into the house of a friendly rabbit. They’re instantly candid and forthright with each other: “So now what are you going to do?” asks the rabbit. “I want to go home,” Felix replies, “but I am afraid to go back outside.” The rabbit gives Felix a cape and climbs on his shoulders wearing a scary mask. “Walk straight ahead and growl like a lion,” he directs. The frightening animals, vanquished, actually shrink, appearing almost babylike as they hide behind trees. De Monfreid’s (I’d Really Like to Eat a Child) pen and ink hatching produces a dense darkness, making the domestic cheer of the rabbit’s warmly lit kitchen all the sweeter. Her insight into the fears and desires of children make for a tale that contains the winning elements of storytelling: suspense, surprise, secret passages, dressing up and hot chocolate. It’s about solving problems and conquering fears, but also just a monstrously good time. Ages 3–5. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Felix is walking through the forest on a dark night, feeling very small and frightened. Startled by "AHOUOUHOU!" he hides in a hollow tree. He sees a wolf arrive and build a fire. Next, he hears "GRRRR!" The wolf is quickly gone, replaced by a fierce tiger. Suddenly, "RRRAAAAAH!" frightens the tiger, and a crocodile appears. Shrinking into the tree, Felix feels a doorknob behind him. The door leads to a set of stairs that descends into a kitchen. There, the boy encounters a rabbit, to whom he explains his escape from the beasts in the forest. With the help of the clever rabbit, Felix gets safely home, for a very funny happy ending. Frightening in the dark beginning, this tale is illustrated with an economy of detail deep amid the trees. Mainly solid colors are used for the cartoon-like animals: gray for the wolf, yellow for the tiger, green for the alligator, and comfortable orange for the rabbit. Felix himself is in bright red pajamas and slippers. Youngsters should enjoy this little bit of fright followed by some fun. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Felix walks into the dark woods (he looks as though he has stepped straight out of a Jules Feiffer cartoon). He is in for a run of bad luck. A scary sound—"AHOUOUHOU!"—sends him running to a hiding place in a hollow tree. It's a wolf, warming itself by a great big fire. Another, even scarier sound frightens the wolf away—a tiger. But wait! The tiger clears out at the scariest sound yet, which issues from a really large, really nasty crocodile. Will Felix be stuck inside the tree forever? A doorknob, a flight of stairs, and a clever rabbit lead the little boy to a way through his quandary and his fear. In fact, the two small, peaceable beings turn the tables, not once, but twice on their terror-inspiring counterparts. A little cool-headedness, a dollop of ingenuity, and a big helping of friendship convert a hopeless situation into a gentle and downright funny triumph. The best part of this wonderful tale is that Felix is an Everyman among children. There is nothing about him that sets him apart from his readers, and every child will be able to picture himself/herself in his shoes. De Monfreid's watercolor-and-ink illustrations are simple, charming, and extraordinarily expressive, making this a lovely book to add to any collection.—Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Originally published in France as Nuit Noire (2007), this charming, not-so-scary bedtime read-aloud drapes like a comforting quilt of familiar storybook characters. Readers don't know why a tiny, red-pajama-wearing boy like Felix is traipsing through the forest alone one dark night, but they won't be surprised when he hears a loud "AHOUOUHOU!" and hides inside a tree. As the boy trembles to behold a fire-building wolf, ferocious tiger and even a crocodile, he burrows further into the tree until he feels a protruding doorknob on a door that leads to a cozy rabbit dwelling. The rabbit agrees to help Felix get back home, and promptly rigs a disguise with a devilish mask and cape so the pair, stacked and newly monstrous, can intimidate the forest creatures. De Monfreid's cartoonish pen-and-ink drawings render the broccoli-treed forest more friendly than ominous, and the triumphant finale in which the human-rabbit team banishes the beasties and celebrates with two mugs of hot chocolate doesn't hurt either. In a clever touch, the sky turns from night-blue to lilac to pink as the sun comes up, and the dark night is no more. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375956874
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
09/22/2009
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Dorothée de Monfreid illustrated I’d Really Like to Eat a Child by Sylviane Donnio. Her deceptively simple writing style and vivid illustrations have been published in more than a dozen children’s books in her native country—she lives in France.

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