The Dark Tide (Ty Hauck Series #1)

The Dark Tide (Ty Hauck Series #1)

3.7 264
by Andrew Gross

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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Blue Zone comes this second mesmerizing thriller about a woman who must unravel the secrets from her dead husband's past.

An explosion rips through New York City's Grand Central Station, destroying the train Karen Friedman's husband, a successful hedge fund manager, is riding in to work. On

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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Blue Zone comes this second mesmerizing thriller about a woman who must unravel the secrets from her dead husband's past.

An explosion rips through New York City's Grand Central Station, destroying the train Karen Friedman's husband, a successful hedge fund manager, is riding in to work. On the same day, there's a suspicious hit-and-run accident in Karen's hometown of Greenwich, Connecticut, and Ty Hauck, a detective, finds a clue that shockingly connects the two seemingly unrelated events.

Months later, two men show up at Karen's home digging into Charles' business dealings. Hundreds of millions of dollars are missing—and the trail points squarely to Charles. Suddenly Karen, with Hauck, steps into a widening storm of hedge fund losses, international scams and murder. And as the investigations converge, these two strangers are pulled into a twisted—and deadly—conspiracy. With its breakneck pacing, plentiful twists, compelling characters, and abundant heart, The Dark Tide confirms Andrew Gross' place as a master storyteller at the top of his game.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Gross, who's partnered with James Patterson on a number of bestsellers (Lifeguard, etc.), mixes murder, suspense, sex and romance as capably as his mentor in his assured second solo thriller (after The Blue Zone). Charles Friedman, a New York hedge fund trader, perishes in a bombing at Grand Central Station that destroys the railroad car in which he was riding one morning from his home in Greenwich, Conn. Ty Hauck, head of the Greenwich police's violent crime unit, enters the picture when a hit-and-run victim turns out to have a vague connection to Friedman. Soon, Friedman's widow and her kids are threatened by men searching for vast sums of money her late husband never earned. The stakes rise as Hauck's involvement shifts from professional to personal. While the reader will occasionally see the next drop, tunnel or curve looming far ahead, the roller-coaster thrills are still there in abundance. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

In Gross's second solo thriller (after The Blue Zone and five best sellers cowritten with James Patterson), divorced detective Ty Hauck and recently widowed mother Karen Friedman stumble into a dangerous conspiracy. Karen's hedge-fund husband, Charles, died-or so everyone presumed-in a terrorist attack in New York City's Grand Central Station. Soon after, when Karen and her children are threatened by unknown sources, she uncovers shocking details regarding her husband's business: he had lost as much as half a billion of his clients' money in questionable investments, more yet is missing from offshore accounts, and individuals once connected to him are now being killed. With Karen's help, Lieutenant Hauck follows a trail that leads to empty oil tankers with falsified manifests, hit-and-run killers, advanced government security systems, and the British Virgin Islands. Gross knows how to spin a fast-paced plot with engaging characters. Karen and Ty are forced to undergo convincing transformations as they unveil one mystery after another. Though the twists may not surprise readers, most will enjoy the ride. Recommended for public libraries.-Ron Terpening, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
Ty Hauck Series, #1
Edition description:
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 4.20(h) x 1.21(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Dark Tide LP

Chapter One

6:10 A.M.

As the morning sun canted sharply through the bedroom window, Charles Friedman dropped the baton.

He hadn't had the dream in years, yet there he was, gangly, twelve years old, running the third leg of the relay in the track meet at summer camp, the battle between the Blue and the Gray squarely on the line. The sky was a brilliant blue, the crowd jumping up and down—crew-cut, red-cheeked faces he would never see again, except here. His teammate, Kyle Bregman, running the preceding leg, was bearing down on him, holding on to a slim lead, cheeks puffing with everything he had.

Reach. . . . 

Charles readied himself, set to take off at the touch of the baton. He felt his fingers twitch, awaiting the slap of the stick in his palm.

There it was! Now! He took off.

Suddenly there was a crushing groan.

Charles stopped, looked down in horror. The baton lay on the ground. The Gray Team completed the exchange, sprinting past him to an improbable victory, their supporters jumping in glee. Cheers of jubilation mixed with jeers of disappointment echoed in Charles's ears.

That's when he woke up. As he always did. Breathing heavily, sheets damp with sweat. Charles glanced at his hands—empty. He patted the covers as if the baton were somehow still there, after thirty years.

But it was only Tobey, their white West Highland terrier, staring wide-eyed and expectantly, straddled turkey-legged on his chest.

Charles let his head fall back with a sigh.

He glanced at the clock: 6:10A.M. Ten minutes before the alarm. His wife, Karen, lay curled up next to him. He hadn't slept much at all. He'd been wide awake from 3:00 to 4:00 A.M., staring at the World's Strongest Female Championship on ESPN2 without the sound, not wanting to disturb her. Something was weighing heavily on Charles's mind.

Maybe it was the large position he had taken in Canadian oil sands last Thursday and had kept through the weekend—highly risky with the price of oil leaking the other way. Or how he had bet up the six-month natural-gas contracts, at the same time going short against the one-years. Friday the energy index had continued to decline. He was scared to get out of bed, scared to look at the screen this morning and see what he'd find.

Or was it Sasha?

For the past ten years, Charles had run his own energy hedge fund in Manhattan, leveraged up eight to one. On the outside—his sandy brown hair, the horn-rim glasses, his bookish calm—he seemed more the estate-planner type or a tax consultant than someone whose bowels (and now his dreams as well!) attested to the fact that he was living in high-beta hell.

Charles pushed himself up in his boxers and paused, elbows on knees. Tobey leaped off the bed ahead of him, scratching feverishly at the door.

"Let him out." Karen stirred, rolling over, yanking the covers over her head.

"You're sure?" Charles checked out the dog, ears pinned back, tail quivering, jumping on his hind legs in anticipation, as if he could turn the knob with his teeth. "You know what's going to happen."

"C'mon, Charlie, it's your turn this morning. Just let the little bastard out."

"Famous last words . . ."

Charles got up and opened the door leading to their fenced-in half-acre yard, a block from the sound in Old Greenwich. In a flash Tobey bolted out onto the patio, his nose fixed to the scent of some unsuspecting rabbit or squirrel.

Immediately the dog began his high-pitched yelp.

Karen scrunched the pillow over her head and growled. "Rrrrggg . . ."

That's how every day began, Charles trudging into the kitchen, turning on CNN and a pot of coffee, the dog barking outside. Then going into his study and checking the European spots online before hopping into the shower.

That morning the spots didn't offer much cheer—$72.10. They had continued to decline. Charles did a quick calculation in his head. Three more contracts he'd be forced to sell out. Another couple of million—gone. It was a little after 6:00 A.M., and he was already underwater.

Outside, Tobey was in the middle of a nonstop three-minute barrage.

In the shower, Charles went over his day. He had to reverse his positions. He had these oil-sand contracts to clear up, then a meeting with one of his lenders. Was it time for him to come clean? He had a transfer to make into his daughter Sam's college account; she'd be a senior at the high school in the fall.

That's when it hit him. Shit!

He had to take in the goddamn car this morning.

The fifteen-thousand-mile service on the Merc. Karen had finally badgered him into making the appointment last week. That meant he'd have to take the train in. It would set him back a bit. He'd hoped to be at his desk by seven-thirty to deal with those positions. Now Karen would have to pick him up at the station later that afternoon.

Dressed, Charles was usually in rush mode by now. The six-thirty wake-up shout to Karen, a knock on Alex's and Samantha's doors to get them rolling for school. Looking over the Wall Street Journal's headlines at the front door.

This morning, thanks to the car, he had a moment to sip his coffee.

They lived in a warm, refurbished Colonial on an affluent tree-lined street in the town of Old Greenwich, a block off the sound. Fully paid for, the damned thing was probably worth more than Charles's father, a tie salesman from Scranton, had earned in his entire life. Maybe he couldn't show it like some of their big-time friends in their megahomes out on North Street, but he'd done well. He'd fought to get himself into Penn from a high-school class of seven hundred, distinguished himself at the energy desk at Morgan Stanley, steered a few private clients away when he'd opened his own firm, Harbor Capital. They had the ski house in Vermont, the kids' college paid for, took fancy vacations.

The Dark Tide LP. Copyright © by Andrew Gross. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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Dark Tide (Ty Hauck Series #1) 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 262 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this novel and literally read it into the late night until finished. Absolutely wonderful. Andrew Gross is more than talented. I much prefer him to James Patterson, who has become predictable and formulaic in my opinion. So full of suspense and the main characters are compelling as well as believable. I so enjoyed Ty as a vulnerable hero. I intend to check out the Blue Zone simply because of this book
Kratz More than 1 year ago
Aside from the early plot twists this story is predictable and over-worked. The female protagonist, Karen, is one of the most annoying characters I've read. The author has chosen to let you into her never ending thoughts of "Why Charles?" "Why did you do this?" "The kids,Charles." "Oh Charlie." Gross could have easily pared the book down 25 pages. It was so predictable that I trudged through it rather than rifling through the pages. I was glad when I finished. I would consider it entertaining for the casual reader but if you relish good mystery thrillers look elsewhere.
pat54 More than 1 year ago
This book had me hooked from the very first chapters. The suspense and plot were gripping.I hadn't had any previous experience reading anything by this author but will be looking for any new books in the future. Surprised it was a free e-book.I began reading it and became so engrossed I continued until I read the book from start to finish.Though the plot was somewhat predictable,I was still completely into the book and couldn't wait to see how the story ended.The characters and the plot were very interesting and convincing. I will be recommending it to friends and family for sure.
Stretch1120 More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be really entertaining, and will definitely look for more Andrew Gross books in the future. Some of the characters were not at well developed as they could have been, but it did not affect the overall story line, which was really exceptional.
JustJans2cents More than 1 year ago
I was startled by the emotions that Andrew Gross was able to insight with his words. Grief was palpable. Anxiety was tangible. From the characters to the settings, I felt I was right there in experiencing it all. The plot twists kept me turning pages. I couldn't put it down until I read the last word.
KLeJeuneLA More than 1 year ago
This is the 2nd book by Andrew Gross, after the first page I was hooked. Could not close the book. Can't wait to see more from this author.
wbauer More than 1 year ago
really enjoyed the book
John_D More than 1 year ago
Gross does a good job getting you involved and keeping you interested as the story unfolds. His writing style is recognizable from James Patterson's books' which is not suprising since he co-authored a few of them. The leading characters are believable and he develops them well. His research is credable and that lends interest to his plot. His first novel on his own was "The Blue Zone". I enjoyed that one as well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Much better than the Blue Zone, and this one leaves Patterson in the dust, Gross has found his place, a mst read. One quick point, it was un Patterson like, keep it up
ClarkP More than 1 year ago
Andrew Gross has written another fantastic book. The Dark Tide is fast-paced and full of suspense, which hooked me from the start and never let me go. The Dark Tide has a detail oriented plot, which requires a careful read from the reader. If Andrew Gross is the future of mystery/thriller/suspense books, then the future is definately bright. Two thumbs up for The Dark Tide.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a convoluted story of multiple murders, high international finances, love and betrayal, treachery, and never ending plot twists. At the end when it is all said and done, one gets the impression that Gross didn't know how to let go of the story. A slew of unlikely characters who change from heroes to villains and back again. And yes, a very irritating language with a lot of "baby," honey," or just "hun" thrown in every dialog. But to most annoying is "hell" and "goddamned" in every spoken sentence, some times managing to put both words in the same sentence. After page 100 it just gets to you. Now, I am not squeamish, and I have nothing against obscenities, profanities, expletives, but enough is enough. And the funny thing is that with all that said the book is readable and makes you want to see the next page while you are at the current one.
janenolan More than 1 year ago
I have read many of Andrew Gross's novels and have never been disappointed. He always has the very best storyline.
Phyllie More than 1 year ago
I listened on CD and could not wait for the next chapter. Lots of mystery and a surprise!!
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I really enjoyed the book as the story line kept me wanting to read it. However, I didn't like the use of raw, ugly language throughout the book. Please keep the bad language out of your books. It doesn't help the story at all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good beach novel. Better than his first book. Nothing too deep, but keeps you reading. I will read this author again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
@Blake: ill explain in a sec. YESH MW HA HA! Ty grins
seldombites More than 1 year ago
This story grips you from page one and the ride continues all the way through. Part mystery, part thriller, this book will have you unable to put it it down. Definitely worth reading.
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