The Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three

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Stephen King returns to the Dark Tower in this second mesmerizing volume in his epic series. Roland of Gilead has mysteriously stepped through a doorway in time that takes him to 1980s America, where he joins forces with the defiant Eddie Dean and courageous Odetta Holmes. A savage struggle has begun in which underworld evil and otherworldly enemies conspire to bring an end to Roland's desperate search for the Dark Tower. Masterfully weaving dark fantasy and icy realism, The Drawing of the Three compulsively ...
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All pages are intact, and the spine and cover are also intact. May have some usage wear, missing or damaged dust jacket, stickers, cover creases, bumped corners, bent pages, ... remainder mark, previous owner label or name, inscription, notes, underlining and/or highlighting. Text only; no CDs, InfoTrac, Access Codes, Activation Keys, or other inclusions, unless otherwise noted. Read more Show Less

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Hard Cover First Thus Fine in Fine jacket First edition thus, first printing. Fine in Fine DJ. The second Dark Tower novel with a new introduction by Stephen King. Illustrated ... by Phil Hale. Read more Show Less

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New York 2003 Hardcover First Trade Edition; First Printing Near Fine in Fine dust jacket 9780670032556. Very faint mark on front edge of book.; The Dark Tower, Book 2; 9 X 6.30 ... X 1.10 inches; 432 pages. Read more Show Less

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New York 2003 Hardcover First Trade Edition; First Printing Fine in Fine dust jacket 9780670032556. The Dark Tower, Book 2; 9 X 6.30 X 1.10 inches; 432 pages.

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New York, NY 2003 Hard cover First edition. First Thus Fine in fine dust jacket. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. With dust jacket. 406 p. Contains: Illustrations. Viking Press, ... New York, New York, U.S.A., 2003. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine As New. Dust Jacket Condition: Fine As New. Perfect and unread. Reprint Edition, 1st printing thus with number line: 1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2. Dustjacket is protected in removable Mylar plastic cover. With a New Introduction by the author. Becoming a very difficult book to find in this condition. Read more Show Less

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The Drawing of the Three: (The Dark Tower #2)

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Overview

Stephen King returns to the Dark Tower in this second mesmerizing volume in his epic series. Roland of Gilead has mysteriously stepped through a doorway in time that takes him to 1980s America, where he joins forces with the defiant Eddie Dean and courageous Odetta Holmes. A savage struggle has begun in which underworld evil and otherworldly enemies conspire to bring an end to Roland's desperate search for the Dark Tower. Masterfully weaving dark fantasy and icy realism, The Drawing of the Three compulsively propels readers toward the next chapter. Set in a world of extraordinary circumstances, filled with stunning visual imagery and unforgettable characters, The Dark Tower series is unlike anything you've ever read. Here is Stephen King's most visionary piece of storytelling, a magical mix of fantasy and horror that may well be his crowning achievement.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780670032556
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/23/2003
  • Series: Dark Tower Series , #2
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 6.32 (w) x 9.36 (h) x 1.31 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen King
STEPHEN KING is a prolific and perennially bestselling author and an recognized master of the horror genre. He was the 2003 recipient of The National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.
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    1. Also Known As:
      Richard Bachman
      Stephen A. King
      Stephen Edwin King
    2. Hometown:
      Bangor, Maine
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 21, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portland, Maine
    1. Education:
      B.S., University of Maine at Orono, 1970
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

The Door

1

Three. This is the number of your fate.

Three?

Yes, three is mystic. Three stands at the heart of the mantra.

Which three?

The first is dark-haired. He stands on the brink of robbery and murder. A demon has infested him. The name of the demon is HEROIN.

Which demon is that? I know it not, even from nursery stories.

He tried to speak but his voice was gone, the voice of the oracle, Star-Slut, Whore of the Winds, both were gone; he saw a card fluttering down from nowhere to nowhere, turning and turning in the lazy dark. On it a baboon grinned from over the shoulder of a young man with dark hair; its disturbingly human fingers were buried so deeply in the young man's neck that their tips had disappeared in flesh. Looking more closely, the gunslinger saw the baboon held a whip in one of those clutching, strangling hands. The face of the ridden man seemed to writhe in wordless terror.

The Prisoner, the man in black (who had once been a man the gunslinger trusted, a man named Walter) whispered chummily. A trifle upsetting, isn't he? A trifle upsetting ... a trifle upsetting ... a trifle-

2

The gunslinger snapped awake, waving at something with his mutilated hand, sure that in a moment one of the monstrous shelled things from the Western Sea would drop on him, desperately enquiring in its foreign tongue as it pulled his face off his skull.

Instead a sea-bird, attracted by the glister of the morning sun on the buttons of his shirt, wheeled away with a frightened squawk.

Roland sat up.

His hand throbbed wretchedly, endlessly. His right foot did the same. Both fingers and toe continued to insist they were there. The bottom half of his shirt was gone; what was left resembled a ragged vest. He had used one piece to bind his hand, the other to bind his foot.

Go away, he told the absent parts of his body. You are ghosts now. Go away.

It helped a little. Not much, but a little. They were ghosts, all right, but lively ghosts.

The gunslinger ate jerky. His mouth wanted it little, his stomach less, but he insisted. When it was inside him, he felt a little stronger. There was not much left, though; he was nearly up against it.

Yet things needed to be done.

He rose unsteadily to his feet and looked about. Birds swooped and dived, but the world seemed to belong to only him and them. The monstrosities were gone. Perhaps they were nocturnal; perhaps tidal. At the moment it seemed to make no difference.

The sea was enormous, meeting the horizon at a misty blue point that was impossible to determine. For a long moment the gunslinger forgot his agony in its contemplation. He had never seen such a body of water. Had heard of it in children's stories, of course, had even been assured by his teachers-some, at least-that it existed-but to actually see it, this immensity, this amazement of water after years of arid land, was difficult to accept ... difficult to even see.

He looked at it for a long time, enrapt, making himself see it, temporarily forgetting his pain in wonder.

But it was morning, and there were still things to be done.

He felt for the jawbone in his back pocket, careful to lead with the palm of his right hand, not wanting the stubs of his fingers to encounter it if it was still there, changing that hand's ceaseless sobbing to screams.

It was.

All right.

Next.

He clumsily unbuckled his gunbelts and laid them on a sunny rock. He removed the guns, swung the chambers out, and removed the useless shells. He threw them away. A bird settled on the bright gleam tossed back by one of them, picked it up in its beak, then dropped it and flew away.

The guns themselves must be tended to, should have been tended to before this, but since no gun in this world or any other was more than a club without ammunition, he laid the gunbelts themselves over his lap before doing anything else and carefully ran his left hand over the leather.

Each of them was damp from buckle and clasp to the point where the belts would cross his hips; from that point they seemed dry. He carefully removed each shell from the dry portions of the belts. His right hand kept trying to do this job, insisted on forgetting its reduction in spite of the pain, and he found himself returning it to his knee again and again, like a dog too stupid or fractious to heel. In his distracted pain he came close to swatting it once or twice.

I see serious problems ahead, he thought again.

He put these shells, hopefully still good, in a pile that was dishearteningly small. Twenty. Of those, a few would almost certainly misfire. He could depend on none of them. He removed the rest and put them in another pile. Thirty-seven.

Well, you weren't heavy loaded, anyway, he thought, but he recognized the difference between fifty-seven live rounds and what might be twenty. Or ten. Or five. Or one. Or none.

He put the dubious shells in a second pile.

He still had his purse. That was one thing. He put it in his lap and then slowly disassembled his guns and performed the ritual of cleaning. By the time he was finished, two hours had passed and his pain was so intense his head reeled with it; conscious thought had become difficult. He wanted to sleep. He had never wanted that more in his life. But in the service of duty there was never any acceptable reason for denial.

"Cort," he said in a voice that he couldn't recognize, and laughed dryly.

Slowly, slowly, he reassembled his revolvers and loaded them with the shells he presumed to be dry. When the job was done, he held the one made for his left hand, cocked it ... and then slowly lowered the hammer again. He wanted to know, yes. Wanted to know if there would be a satisfying report when he squeezed the trigger or only another of those useless clicks. But a click would mean nothing, and a report would only reduce twenty to nineteen ... or nine ... or three ... or none.

He tore away another piece of his shirt, put the other shells-the ones which had been wetted-in it, and tied it, using his left hand and his teeth. He put them in his purse.

Sleep, his body demanded. Sleep, you must sleep, now, before dark, there's nothing left, you're used up- He tottered to his feet and looked up and down the deserted strand. It was the color of an undergarment which has gone a long time without washing, littered with sea-shells which had no color. Here and there large rocks protruded from the gross-grained sand, and these were covered with guano, the older layers the yellow of ancient teeth, the fresher splotches white.

The high-tide line was marked with drying kelp. He could see pieces of his right boot and his waterskins lying near that line. He thought it almost a miracle that the skins hadn't been washed out to sea by high-surging waves. Walking slowly, limping exquisitely, the gunslinger made his way to where they were. He picked up one of them and shook it by his ear. The other was empty. This one still had a little water left in it. Most would not have been able to tell the difference between the two, but the gunslinger knew each just as well as a mother knows which of her identical twins is which. He had been travelling with these waterskins for a long, long time. Water sloshed inside. That was good-a gift. Either the creature which had attacked him or any of the others could have torn this or the other open with one casual bite or slice of claw, but none had and the tide had spared it. Of the creature itself there was no sign, although the two of them had finished far above the tide-line. Perhaps other predators had taken it; perhaps its own kind had given it a burial at sea, as the elaphaunts, giant creatures of whom he had heard in childhood stories, were reputed to bury their own dead.

He lifted the waterskin with his left elbow, drank deeply, and felt some strength come back into him. The right boot was of course ruined ... but then he felt a spark of hope. The foot itself was intact-scarred but intact-and it might be possible to cut the other down to match it, to make something which would last at least awhile.... Faintness stole over him. He fought it but his knees unhinged and he sat down, stupidly biting his tongue.

You won't fall unconscious, he told himself grimly. Not here, not where another of those things can come back tonight and finish the job.

So he got to his feet and tied the empty skin about his waist, but he had only gone twenty yards back toward the place where he had left his guns and purse when he fell down again, half-fainting. He lay there awhile, one cheek pressed against the sand, the edge of a seashell biting against the edge of his jaw almost deep enough to draw blood. He managed to drink from the waterskin, and then he crawled back to the place where he had awakened. There was a Joshua tree twenty yards up the slope-it was stunted, but it would offer at least some shade.

To Roland the twenty yards looked like twenty miles.

Nonetheless, he laboriously pushed what remained of his possessions into that little puddle of shade. He lay there with his head in the grass, already fading toward what could be sleep or unconsciousness or death. He looked into the sky and tried to judge the time. Not noon, but the size of the puddle of shade in which he rested said noon was close. He held on a moment longer, turning his right arm over and bringing it close to his eyes, looking for the telltale red lines of infection, of some poison seeping steadily toward the middle of him.

The palm of his hand was a dull red. Not a good sign.

I jerk off left-handed, he thought, at least that's something.

Then darkness took him, and he slept for the next sixteen hours with the sound of the Western Sea pounding ceaselessly in his dreaming ears.

3

When the gunslinger awoke again the sea was dark but there was faint light in the sky to the east. Morning was on its way. He sat up and waves of dizziness almost overcame him.

He bent his head and waited.

When the faintness had passed, he looked at his hand. It was infected, all right-a tell-tale red swelling that spread up the palm and to the wrist. It stopped there, but already he could see the faint beginnings of other red lines, which would lead eventually to his heart and kill him. He felt hot, feverish.

I need medicine, he thought. But there is no medicine here.

Had he come this far just to die, then? He would not. And if he were to die in spite of his determination, he would die on his way to the Tower.

How remarkable you are, gunslinger! the man in black tittered inside his head. How indomitable! How romantic in your stupid obsession!

"Fuck you," he croaked, and drank. Not much water left, either. There was a whole sea in front of him, for all the good it could do him; water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink. Never mind.

He buckled on his gunbelts, tied them-this was a process which took so long that before he was done the first faint light of dawn had brightened to the day's actual prologue-and then tried to stand up. He was not convinced he could do it until it was done.

Holding to the Joshua tree with his left hand, he scooped up the not-quite-empty waterskin with his right arm and slung it over his shoulder. Then his purse. When he straightened, the faintness washed over him again and he put his head down, waiting, willing.

The faintness passed.

Walking with the weaving, wavering steps of a man in the last stages of ambulatory drunkenness, the gunslinger made his way back down to the strand. He stood, looking at an ocean as dark as mulberry wine, and then took the last of his jerky from his purse. He ate half, and this time both mouth and stomach accepted a little more willingly. He turned and ate the other half as he watched the sun come up over the mountains where Jake had died-first seeming to catch on the cruel and treeless teeth of those peaks, then rising above them.

Roland held his face to the sun, closed his eyes, and smiled. He ate the rest of his jerky.

He thought: Very well. I am now a man with no food, with two less fingers and one less toe than I was born with; I am a gunslinger with shells which may not fire; I am sickening from a monster's bite and have no medicine; I have a day's water if I'm lucky; I may be able to walk perhaps a dozen miles if I press myself to the last extremity. I am, in short, a man on the edge of everything.

Which way should he walk? He had come from the east; he could not walk west without the powers of a saint or a savior. That left north and south.

North.

That was the answer his heart told. There was no question in it.

North.

The gunslinger began to walk.

4

He walked for three hours. He fell twice, and the second time he did not believe he would be able to get up again. Then a wave came toward him, close enough to make him remember his guns, and he was up before he knew it, standing on legs that quivered like stilts.

He thought he had managed about four miles in those three hours. Now the sun was growing hot, but not hot enough to explain the way his head pounded or the sweat pouring down his face; nor was the breeze from the sea strong enough to explain the sudden fits of shuddering which sometimes gripped him, making his body lump into gooseflesh and his teeth chatter.

Fever, gunslinger, the man in black tittered. What's left inside you has been touched afire.

The red lines of infection were more pronounced now; they had marched upward from his right wrist halfway to his elbow.

He made another mile and drained his waterbag dry. He tied it around his waist with the other. The landscape was monotonous and unpleasing. The sea to his right, the mountains to his left, the gray, shell-littered sand under the feet of his cut-down boots. The waves came and went. He looked for the lobstrosities and saw none. He walked out of nowhere toward nowhere, a man from another time who, it seemed, had reached a point of pointless ending.

Shortly before noon he fell again and knew he could not get up. This was the place, then. Here. This was the end, after all.

On his hands and knees, he raised his head like a groggy fighter ... and some distance ahead, perhaps a mile, perhaps three (it was difficult to judge distances along the unchanging reach of the strand with the fever working inside him, making his eyeballs pulse in and out), he saw something new. Something which stood upright on the beach.

What was it?

(three)

Didn't matter.

(three is the number of your fate)

The gunslinger managed to get to his feet again. He croaked something, some plea which only the circling seabirds heard (and how happy they would be to gobble my eyes from my head, he thought, how happy to have such a tasty bit!), and walked on, weaving more seriously now, leaving tracks behind him that were weird loops and swoops.

He kept his eyes on whatever it was that stood on the strand ahead. When his hair fell in his eyes he brushed it aside. It seemed to grow no closer. The sun reached the roof of the sky, where it seemed to remain far too long. Roland imagined he was in the desert again, somewhere between the last outlander's hut (the musical fruit the more you eat the more you toot) and the way-station where the boy (your Isaac) had awaited his coming.

His knees buckled, straightened, buckled, straightened again. When his hair fell in his eyes once more he did not bother to push it back; did not have the strength to push it back. He looked at the object, which now cast a narrow shadow back toward the upland, and kept walking.

He could make it out now, fever or no fever.

It was a door.

Less than a quarter of a mile from it, Roland's knees buckled again and this time he could not stiffen their hinges. He fell, his right hand dragged across gritty sand and shells, the stumps of his fingers screamed as fresh scabs were scored away. The stumps began to bleed again.

So he crawled. Crawled with the steady rush, roar, and retreat of the Western Sea in his ears. He used his elbows and his knees, digging grooves in the sand above the twist of dirty green kelp which marked the high-tide line. He supposed the wind was still blowing-it must be, for the chills continued to whip through his body-but the only wind he could hear was the harsh gale which gusted in and out of his own lungs.

The door grew closer.

Closer.

At last, around three o'clock of that long delirious day, with his shadow beginning to grow long on his left, he reached it. He sat back on his haunches and regarded it wearily.

It stood six and a half feet high and appeared to be made of solid ironwood, although the nearest ironwood tree must grow seven hundred miles or more from here. The doorknob looked as if it were made of gold, and it was filigreed with a design which the gunslinger finally recognized: it was the grinning face of the baboon.

There was no keyhole in the knob, above it, or below it.

The door had hinges, but they were fastened to nothing-or so it seems, the gunslinger thought. This is a mystery, a most marvellous mystery, but does it really matter? You are dying. Your own mystery-the only one that really matters to any man or woman in the end- approaches.

All the same, it did seem to matter.

This door. This door where no door should be. It simply stood there on the gray strand twenty feet above the high-tide line, seemingly as eternal as the sea itself, now casting the slanted shadow of its thickness toward the east as the sun westered.

Written upon it in black letters two-thirds of the way up, written in the high speech, were two words:

THE PRISONER A demon has infested him. The name of the demon is HEROIN.

The gunslinger could hear a low droning noise. At first he thought it must be the wind or a sound in his own feverish head, but he became more and more convinced that the sound was the sound of motors ... and that it was coming from behind the door.

Open it then. It's not locked. You know it's not locked.

Instead he tottered gracelessly to his feet and walked above the door and around to the other side.

There was no other side.

--from The Drawing of the Three: The Dark Tower II by Stephen King, copyright © 1987, 2003 Stephen King, published by Viking Press, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., all rights reserved, reprinted with permission from the publisher.

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Average Rating 4.5
( 230 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 186 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2010

    Recently discovered Dark Tower series

    King's ability to drawn you in to the strangest (and scariest) tales is a gift. Love this series!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Drawing of the Three, the Dark Tower series, Book 2

    Coming soon.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2006

    The best of the Dark Tower Series

    After finishing all of the Dark Tower books, this book sticks with my mind and I have to say that it is the best of all seven. It's quick paced, suspenseful, and King sticks to his story telling style. I like that in the book Roland is no longer on his own, and the new charcters have a chance at redemtion. Through this book you become invovled with the characters lives and it leaves you wanting more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2006

    Wow

    I gotta tell you, The Drawing of the Three was one of my favorite books in history. From start to finish it never lets go of you. It was absolutely incredible. The action and suspense keep going. It sucks you in and grabs you by the throat while you keep reading it. It's one of those rare novels that you can read over and over again without it losing its punch. Just incredible. An absolute must-read. If you haven't read this, you are missing King at his best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2005

    Excellent! Backstory, Twists, Turns, WOW!

    This was an excellent second volume. Alot is owed to The Gunslinger, for setting up a series of events that makes a compelling sequel. There are so many twists and layers to this story. The unique characters are brilliant.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2004

    Good Book

    This book was awesome. It was about the Gunslinger and how he stumbles upon three doors. 'The Prisoner', 'the Lady of Shadows' and 'the Pusher'. I wont tell you who these people are or what their story is and how they ended up in a different world, but I will tell you that they end up training to become the new Gunslingers. This book is filled with twists and turns, deserts and beaches, as well as New York. I strongly recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2004

    Incredible!

    I read the Gunslinger and I thought that it was a good story, but when reading this book, what a ride! This book has everything in it! It's got romance, horror, humor, violence, rational and irrational reasonings. Stephen King is definately the man when he wrote this story! An awesome page turner. I was turning the pages so fast, that I got a few paper cuts when turning the pages. This book proves that Stephen King is definately one of the best creative writers in the history of literature. Thanks a lot Stephen for making me feel happy when reading this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2004

    Frank Muller does it again

    Another great book! When i bought this in 98, I wasn't sure if Muller could pull it off. He went well beyond my expectations, however. He brought Roland, Eddy, and Susana to life. That's the stuff of an excelent narator. Frank is the perfect narator to read such an amazing series. What do we learn in this work? We learn of the doors between worlds. We learn more about the concept of ka, or destiny, and what it means to Roland. I love the character development of Eddy. He goes from junky to hero. Well, he's not all the way there yet, but he's getting there. Its great to see that Roland is no longer alone on his road to the tower.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2004

    awesome

    awesome, i recommend to everyone who read the 1st

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2004

    did a chick, dod a chock?

    if you've read the gunslinger, i hardly need to tell you why you must continue on the quest. not to be let down, the reader will enjoy learning more about roland's mysterious world. and if you haven't read the gunslinger, stop what you're doing right now and pick up a copy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2003

    Better than the first!

    If you liked 'The Gunslinger' then you will defenently like 'The Drawing of the Three'! It has more characters and more action. This book is exciting, thrilling, and breathtaking. It also tells more about the dark tower! A most read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2003

    The Drawing of Three is original and Extremely Entertaining

    I've enjoyed all four available Dark Tower books but I'll have to say my favorite is The Drawing of Three(DT2). This well written novel is an exciting tale that blends science fiction and fantasy with a touch horror. The Dark Tower 2 leaves the reader eagerly awaiting each chapter to find out what worlds Roland will travel to and what mystery's he will uncover on his journey to the Dark Tower. I've just finished reading Wizard and Glass(DT4) and can't wait for the fifth book to come out(Wolves of the Calla) in November 2003.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2003

    The best in the series (I-IV)

    One of the aspects that separates SK from most other writers in his 'field' is his ability to develop background on characters that prevents them from being trivialized in such an epic as this series. The depth that the characters of Eddie Dean and Odetta / Detta are given would usually be reserved for a primary character (Roland). All of the books are fantastic, but this one is the pinnacle to date.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2003

    best series ever

    the dark tower series ever. no one could ever match his stories. 2 is the best because you meet the new people and you see how Roland has too adjust to his hand.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    great continuation of Stephen King¿s epic fantasy

    The ¿confrontation¿ with the Man in Black finally occurred (see THE GUNSLINGER), but left Roland unfulfilled. Roland is on a beach assaulted by a sea monstrosity ripping off two fingers and a toe. After killing this creature, he begins the second part of his journey to the Dark Tower. <P>Roland enters a door on the beach labeled ¿The Prisoner¿ and realizes he sees an eerie world through the eyes of Eddie Dean, American heroin addict flying to the USA with cocaine in 1987. Eddie¿s employer Balazar brings him to The Leaning Tower where a gunfight breaks out before the duo returns to Roland¿s realm. They reach beach door two and meet schizophrenic wheel chair bound Odetta Holmes and her darker half Detta Walker in 1964. Now Detta is a killing machine trying to get out who could easily end Roland¿s quest before he attains the third and final beach door of drug pusher of death Jack Mort if he is not careful. Roland has drawn the trio that is apparently his companions for this trek. <P>Book Two of the Dark Tower is a great continuation of Stephen King¿s epic fantasy. The story line continues Roland¿s quest bit does not feel like a middle book filler tale. With the reprint of the entire series, fans will have quite a treat as these 1980s novels hold up quite nicely as some of Mr. King¿s best works, at least this one and the first tale that this reviewer recently re-read. This is Mr. King at his darkest and strongest yet seems to leave the audience with a flicker of hope. <P>Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2003

    Worth more than $28.00

    It is so well writen from start to finish.I have had it two days and im already at the 207th page,thats how addicting it is.If you are looking for a good read this is it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2002

    This is great

    This is a great book, and I too think it is the best of the series, at least so far. The characters are indeed the best part of it though, and I am excited when I think of the next three books. All in all, it rocks

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2002

    The best of the Dark Towers, and one of King's best

    This book is great, no less. If I could, I would give it way more stars. The whole premise of the doors, the gunslinger, the idea of a multiverse, and the world moving on are all awesome ideas from a brilliant mind. Eddie and Susannah are both cool characters, but Roland easily steals the show with his cool demeanor and almost superhuman speed. The lobstocites are great, and the book is so descriptive and fun to read that I can see why King is famous because of it. I have read all the Dark Towers, and this is by far the best, but I still twist and turn at night like a kid before Christmas when I think of the day Dark Tower 5: the Crawling Shadow blesses the bookstore.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2002

    AWESOME!

    Totally awesome! Great character developement, just, everything was awesome.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2001

    Disappointed

    I love Stephen King - but this book is certainly not one of his best. Very slow and bland. I don't recommend it unless you're a die-hard King fan. I read it only because I have faith that book three and four will be much better

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