Dark Wraith of Shannara [NOOK Book]

Overview

THE FIRST-EVER GRAPHIC NOVEL SET IN THE WORLD OF SHANNARA! Possessing an awesome power he is only beginning to understand, young Jair Ohmsford must summon the devastating yet darkly seductive magic of the wishsong on a fateful mission to save his friends . . . and protect the future from the forces of evil. If you’ve never ventured into the wondrous world of Shannara, consider this an ideal opportunity. Prepare to enter the breathtaking realm of the Four Lands, where beings both noble and sinister have quested ...
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Dark Wraith of Shannara

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Overview

THE FIRST-EVER GRAPHIC NOVEL SET IN THE WORLD OF SHANNARA! Possessing an awesome power he is only beginning to understand, young Jair Ohmsford must summon the devastating yet darkly seductive magic of the wishsong on a fateful mission to save his friends . . . and protect the future from the forces of evil. If you’ve never ventured into the wondrous world of Shannara, consider this an ideal opportunity. Prepare to enter the breathtaking realm of the Four Lands, where beings both noble and sinister have quested and clashed, crossed swords in the names of darkness and light, and engaged in adventures rich with mystery and majesty. “Terry’s place is at the head of the fantasy world.” –Philip Pullman, author of The Golden Compass
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Fantasy wizard Terry Brooks breaks new ground with this paperback original, the first-ever graphic novel set in the mythical realm of Shannara. This stunning novel, which arrives complete with a stage-setting prologue, takes place after the events of The Wishsong of Shannara, the third volume in the original trilogy. Focusing on Jair Ohmsford and other characters from that novel, Dark Wraith of Shannara features a vivid action story that fits snugly into graphic presentation. With its Karasawa-inspired black-and-white starkness, Shadowchasers creator Edwin David's illustrations capture perfectly the intensity of Brooks's writing.
School Library Journal

Gr 10 Up -At the end of the "Shannara" trilogy (Random, 1987), Brin and Jair Ohmsford used their "wishsong" power to destroy the Ildatch, the ultimate in dark magic books, and save the world from evil. It was a battle in which they lost many friends, including Jair's most trusted companion, Weapons Master Garet Jax, who had appeared invincible. It seemed as though the siblings had fulfilled their Ohmsford heritage and vanquished the foe-the operative word being "seemed." Now the story continues in graphic-novel form. The characters and action are true to the Shannara legacy. Here Jair is called to destroy the last fragment of the Ildatch. Using magic, he is able to call forth and become Weapons Master Garet Jax, although this power puts his own soul in jeopardy. This exciting story sets the stage for a sequel. The black-and-white art is expressive and uses creepy shadow to convey the black arts at work. Although the art is classic comic book style and it is printed in standard left-to-right form, the novel should have great appeal to those who like fantasy-adventure manga because of its tone and subject matter. This quick, exciting adventure won't disappoint Brooks's fans, and it is a terrific way to hook reluctant readers, who will want to pick up one of the many "Shannara" novels to find out more about these characters.-Dana Cobern-Kullman, Luther Burbank Middle School, Burbank, CA

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345546456
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/30/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 152,715
  • File size: 201 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Terry Brooks
Terry Brooks
A phenomenally successful author thanks to his Shannara fantasy series, Terry Brooks is considered by some to be an heir to J.R.R. Tolkien. He creates characters and worlds that readers fall in love with, and can't wait to revisit.

Biography

"I found my way to fantasy/adventure. When I got there, I knew I'd found a home," said Terence Dean Brooks, creator of the blockbuster, New York Times bestselling Shannara, Landover, and Word & Void series. Not only is Brooks at home in the highly competitive realm of fantasy literature, many would call him the genre’s modern-day patriarch – Tolkien’s successor. While that title is debatable, Brooks is, without a doubt, one of the world’s most prolific and successful authors of otherworld (and our world) fantasy. Few writers in any genre can boast a more entertaining collection of work – and a more ravenous and loyal fan base -- than can Terry Brooks.

The most rewarding aspect to writing for Brooks is “when someone who never read a book reads [one of mine] and says that the experience changed everything and got them reading.” Because of his very engaging, quick-flowing writing style, countless numbers of young people have been introduced to the wonderful world of reading through Brooks’s adventures. The miraculous thing, however, is that these same fans – whether they’re now 20, 30, or 40 years old – still devour each new release like a starving man would a steak dinner. Credit Brooks’s boundless imagination, endearing characters, fresh storylines and underlying complexities for keeping his older, more discerning audience hooked.

Brooks began writing when he was just ten years old, but he did not discover fantasy until much later. As a high school student he jumped from writing science fiction to westerns to adventure to nonfiction, unable to settle on one form. That changed when, at the age of 21, Brooks was introduced to J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien provided Brooks with a forum “that would allow him to release onto paper his own ideas about life, love, and the wonder that fills his world," according to his web site.

In 1977, after six trying years, Brooks published novel his first novel, The Sword of Shannara. And quickly it gave him – and his publisher (the newly created Ballantine imprint, Del Rey) – quite a thrill; the fantasy adventure featuring the young Halfling, Shea Ohmsford; the mysterious wizard Allanon; Flick, the trusty companion; and the demonic Warlock Lord, was not only well received -- it was a smash, spending over five months on The New York Times bestseller list. In 1982 Brooks released the follow-up, The Elfstones of Shannara (which Brooks says may be his favorite), to equal success. He closed out the initial trilogy in 1985 with The Wishsong of Shannara, and has since completed two more Shannara sets, The Heritage of Shannara books and the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara books.

As fans of Brooks know, the man doesn’t like to stay put. “I lived in Illinois for the first 42 years of my life, and I told myself when I left in 1986 that I would never live any one place again,” Brooks said. He now spends his time between his homes in Seattle and Hawaii; he and his wife also spend a great deal of time on the road each year connecting with the fans. These same nomadic tendencies are also apparent in his writing. Instead of staying comfortably within his proven, bestselling Shannara series, Terry frequently takes chances, steps outside, and tries something new. His marvelous Landover and Word & Void series are the results. While both are vastly different from Shannara, they are equally compelling. Word & Void – a contemporary, dark urban fantasy series set in a fantasy-touched Illinois – is quite possibly Brooks’s most acclaimed series. The Rocky Mountain News called the series’ first two books (Running with the Demon and The Knight of the Word “two of the finest science fiction/fantasy novels of the 20th century.”

Good To Know

When The Sword of Shannara hit The New York Times bestseller list, Brooks became the first modern fantasy author to achieve that pinnacle.

The Sword of Shannara was also the first work of fiction to ever hit The New York Times trade paperback bestseller list. Thanks to a faithful and growing fan base, the books continue to reach the list.

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace was not Terry's first novelization. He also novelized Steven Spielberg's 1991 movie, Hook.

Brooks’s The Phantom Menace novelization is also not his only connection to George Lucas. Both The Sword of Shannara and the original Star Wars novel, A New Hope, were edited by Judy Lynn del Rey and published in the same year (1977) to blockbuster success.

The Sword of Shannara was initially turned down by DAW Books. Instead, DAW sent Terry to Lester del Rey, who recognized Terry’s blockbuster potential and bought it. And the rest, they say, is history.

Brooks’s influences include: J.R.R. Tolkien, Alexander Dumas, James Fenimore Cooper, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and Mallory's Morte d'Arthur.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Terence Dean Brooks (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Pacific Northwest and Hawaii
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 8, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Sterling, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Hamilton College, 1966; J.D., Washington and Lee University
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

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1 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 20, 2011

    Would not recommend buying in NookBook form.

    I have read almost all of Terry Brooks books on the Shannara Series. I did not know that the Dark Wraith of Shannara was a comic book. I cannot read it on my Nook, the print will not get large enough and the illistrations not plain enough to see and read. This was a waste of money for the product received. Please let everyone know before they buy that this book is not one to get on your Nook.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2011

    Would not recommend

    It's a over sized comic book. The comic book portion is only 14 of 37 nook pages. While the rest is narration on how the comic was produced. Extremely disappointed.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2011

    Thought this was a book not an illustration

    Need a way to preview before buying

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2011

    Can't read on nook

    Unfortunately the nook does not display the comic without the margins and the text is too small to read. I have not been able to read this comic at all unless B&N releases a nook app for the mac. Hopefully the nookcolor does better with comics.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I was nervous, but didn't need to be

    I finished reading Dark Wraith a day or two ago. First let me say/acknowledge that I've been a Brooks fan for, wow, about 20 years now. I've read all of his books except two -- First King, which for some reason I just cannot get into -- and Elves of Cintra, which is on my reading list for the summer. Except for First King, I've thoroughly enjoyed them all (the movie adaptations are a little iffy, yes). Terry has a great way of creating worlds and characters that are very believable and accessible. Even though his genre is fantasy, his character's situations and dilemmas are universal which makes his books all that much stronger.

    When Terry announced that there was going to be a Shannara graphic novel, I had mixed emotions. I read comics as a kid and have enjoyed some of the graphic novels out there. I'm not a graphic novel die hard by any means. I was worried that the graphic novelization of the Shannara world could taint it or corrupt it somehow. The world seems to be in a graphic novel loving frenzy these days and I'm sure that's part of the reason for the push at this time. I enjoyed the art from the Hildebrandts and I have the art compendium for Shannara. While it's fun to see artists' representations, it can sometimes hurt the imagination.

    Still, I was excited to see a new story from the Shannara world. I was also excited to see the sense of movement and excitement visually presented.

    I would definitely recommend this book to lovers of the Shannara world and fans of fantasy and/or graphic novels. The story is engaging and the artwork is fabulous.

    My main criticism is the seeming lack of length/depth. The story itself is only ~160 pages and it travels fairly quickly. I agree with the comments of the adaptor who said this could easily expand into something much larger. If a "picture is worth a thousand words", then we're probably still pretty close to a standard novel size, maybe still a bit shorter. So much of the struggle that goes on in Shannara books is internal to the characters, something that is difficult to bring into a graphic novel and still maintain the pacing created in this form. The adventure itself goes very quickly. The general pacing of the travel and the adventure is good, I just want more of it.

    Again, I haven't read the original trilogy for a while, so I may be perhaps dwelling too much on the modern Brooks. I definitely recall that over the years, Terry's plotlines have become much more complex...intricate spiderwebs of motivations and subplots. I think I wanted to see more of that in this book. But that may have been a bit overwhelming for the graphic novel form and it may also be that this style is more true to the original Wishsong.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 27, 2009

    Decent read. But only if you've read Indomitable.

    This book is a good change from the usual, though I wouldn't advise reading it without having read indomitable, as it's a direct sequel. It's a good story, though the main villain is fairly undeveloped. Regardless, it's a good read, and the artist is fairly talented.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2008

    It's not a comic book

    I would like to see him go back to the regular style of writting. This book is hard to read for some readers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2008

    I'm not sure I enjoy a comic/graphic novel as much as imagination.

    I hope that his books aren't going to be like this from now on. I may have to find a new author. I really enjoy reading his older stuff for a few days.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2008

    Stick to novels

    The book had a great story line and the depictions of the characters fit his novels, but it was not as good as his novels i believe that although it was good Terry should stick to his novels.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2008

    Great Short Story

    The story was very well written and there were great graphics. It could have been longer and color graphics would have been awesome.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2008

    Needs more depth

    The story line was top notch it just didn't go into enough story to make it great. I read it in about 4 hours instead of the usual few days for one of Terry Brooks novels. It seems he missed a chance for another great novel along the Wishsong's story.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    fine stand alone graphic comic book

    Dark Wraith of Shannara Adapted from the novels of Terry Brooks by Robert Place Napton art by Edwin David Del Rey, 2008, $13.95 ISBN 9780345494627 --- In the Four Lands, the dream frightens Jair Ohmsford as he finds himself in trouble with shades like the late great warrior Jaret Jax the Weapons Master helping him survive his nightmare. However, reality proves even scarier when the shade of Allonon warns him an evil inhuman race the Mwellerts have a new scheme starting with the abduction of two of Jair¿s friends Kimber and Cogline. Jair knows he must rescue them, but no one wants to abet his cause out of fear of the enemy. Still he has power if he dares use the dark magic Wishsong that his father and his sister have cautioned as the price of employing this conjuring could be his soul. However, reluctantly he turns to the spirit of a deceased warrior for help as the enemy has come for him because he has proven with his sister to being the one to prevent the Mwells from making a nightmarish future for everyone. --- DARK WRAITH OF SHANNARA is a stand alone graphic comic book that is a direct follow up to Terry Brooks¿ WISHSONG OF SHANNARA. The story line is entertaining due to the prime character as Jair, not wanting to bring his sibling Brin into what he believes is his cause, has difficult magical choices to make to save his friends. The black and white artwork is well done as the pictures enhance the plot. There are several other background sections that might fascinate some readers like the ¿The making of Dark Wraith¿ and ¿The Artist¿s Sketchbook¿ but this reviewer has no interest (even with the art being top rate) in those sections so I only gave it a quick glimpse. Fans of the Shannara saga will enjoy this novel entry. --- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

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