Darling On Trusts

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
THE SHERMAN LAW The nineteenth century has been one of great progress in the application of science and art to industry. With an increasing control over natural forces the great resources of the United States have been developed. ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
THE SHERMAN LAW The nineteenth century has been one of great progress in the application of science and art to industry. With an increasing control over natural forces the great resources of the United States have been developed. Until recently little attention was paid to the laws of business, for the field was an open one, and those engaged in business enterprises objected to any restriction. The attention of Congress was called to the large artificial combinations of manufacturers and dealers that had developed in the 8o's and existed in nearly every State, causing articles of incorporation to be issued indiscriminately,—articles that gave power to engage in all forms of industry, legal or otherwise,—to groups of men who were able to pay reasonable organization fees. These aggregations, or combinations, became 90 strong that only Congress had the power to check them; which was done by the enactment of the Sherman Anti-Trust Law of 1880; a law that was enacted for the purpose of preventing unlawful restraints in the trade and commerce of the United States and its territories. In other words, it is a law by which each man may be compelled to recognize the rights of his fellow-citizens and be prevented from causing the ruin of competitors by the formation of conspiracies or combinations in restraint of trade. This large country, with its hundred million people, requires big industries and enormous capital to do business satisfactorily, and the recognition of the power of the Government as greater than that of any aggregation or body of men is necessary to protect the rights of the powerful as well as those of the weak. National legislation, often contrary to State laws, is necessary and will eventually come, permitting the advantages of reasonable cooperation in the co...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781103398119
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 2/11/2009
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

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THE SHERMAN LAW The nineteenth century has been one of great progress in the application of science and art to industry. With an increasing control over natural forces the great resources of the United States have been developed. Until recently little attention was paid to the laws of business, for the field was an open one, and those engaged in business enterprises objected to any restriction. The attention of Congress was called to the large artificial combinations of manufacturers and dealers that had developed in the 8o's and existed in nearly every State, causing articles of incorporation to be issued indiscriminately,—articles that gave power to engage in all forms of industry, legal or otherwise,—to groups of men who were able to pay reasonable organization fees. These aggregations, or combinations, became 90 strong that only Congress had the power to check them; which was done by the enactment of the Sherman Anti-Trust Law of 1880; a law that was enacted for the purpose of preventing unlawful restraints in the trade and commerce of the United States and its territories. In other words, it is a law by which each man may be compelled to recognize the rights of his fellow-citizens and be prevented from causing the ruin of competitors by the formation of conspiracies or combinations in restraint of trade. This large country, with its hundred million people, requires big industries and enormous capital to do business satisfactorily, and the recognition of the power of the Government as greater than that of any aggregation or body of men is necessary to protect the rights of the powerful as well as those of the weak. National legislation, often contrary to State laws,is necessary and will eventually come, permitting the advantages of reasonable cooperation in the co...
Read More Show Less

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