Darwinism and other essays

Darwinism and other essays

by John Fiske
     
 

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III. DR. BATEMAN ON DARWINISM.1 DR. BATEMAN's argument against Darwinism is based upon a fallacy which is quite commonly shared by those who have failed to comprehend the…  See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
III. DR. BATEMAN ON DARWINISM.1 DR. BATEMAN's argument against Darwinism is based upon a fallacy which is quite commonly shared by those who have failed to comprehend the doctrine of evolution.2 This is the fallacy of supposing that the Darwinian theory can be overthrown simply by insisting upon the obvious fact that the intelligence and acquirements of man are enormously —almost incommensurably—greater than the intelligence and acquirements of the highest apes. As urged in the case of language, Dr. Bateman's argument is not original with him, as he seems to suppose ; it has already been urged by Max Miiller, awriter far more distinguished for brilliancy of expression than for profundity of thought. In substance it consists of three propositions:— 1 Darwinism Tested by Language. By Frederic Bateman, M.D. With a Preface by E. M. Goulburn, D.D., Dean of Norwich. London. New York : Scribner and Welford. 1878. 2 On this point see my Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy, 1874, Part II., chaps, xxi., xxii. " i. That articulate speech is a distinctive attribute of man, and that the ape and lower animals do not possess a trace of it. " 2. That articulate speech is a universal attribute of man, that all races have a language, or the capacity of acquiring it. " 3. The immateriality of the faculty of speech." It is perhaps hardly correct to call this last point a " proposition," nor is it easy to determine precisely its purport or its relevance. We are told farther on that although " a certain normal and healthy state of cerebral tissue is necessary for the exterior manifestation of the faculty of speech," it by no means follows that speech is located in a particular portion of the brain, or is the " result of a certain definite molecular condition of the cerebral organ." Of...

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ISBN-13:
2940019510511
Publisher:
London ; New York : Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
443 KB

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