Data Flow: Visualising Information in Graphic Design

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More and more information is being visualised. Diagrams, data and information graphics are utilised wherever increasingly complex elements are present, whether it is in magazines, non-fiction books or business reports, packages or exhibition designs. Data Flow presents an abundant range of possibilities in visualising data and information. Today, diagrams are being applied beyond their classical fields of use. In addition to archetypical diagrams such as pie charts and histograms, there are manifold types of ...
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Overview

More and more information is being visualised. Diagrams, data and information graphics are utilised wherever increasingly complex elements are present, whether it is in magazines, non-fiction books or business reports, packages or exhibition designs. Data Flow presents an abundant range of possibilities in visualising data and information. Today, diagrams are being applied beyond their classical fields of use. In addition to archetypical diagrams such as pie charts and histograms, there are manifold types of diagrams developed for use in distinct cases and categories. These range from chart-like diagrams such as bar, plot, line diagrams and spider charts, graph-based diagrams including line, matrix, process flow, and molecular diagrams to extremely complex three-dimensional diagrams. The more concrete the variables, the more aesthetically elaborate the graphics sometimes reaching the point of art the more abstract, the simpler the readability. The abundant examples in Data Flow showcase the various methodologies behind information design with solutions concerning complexity, simplification, readability and the (over)production of information. In addition to the examples shown, the book features explanatory text. On 256 pages, Data Flow introduces a comprehensive selection of innovatively designed diagrams. This up-to-date survey provides inspiration and concrete solutions for designers, and at the same time unlocks a new field of visual codes.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783899552171
  • Publisher: Die Gestalten Verlag
  • Publication date: 9/28/2008
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 9.60 (w) x 12.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

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  • Posted November 6, 2008

    latest developements in designs for information known as infotechture

    Pie charts, line graphs, and diagrams are typical kinds of tools to visualize data to grasp what it is indicating and to utilize it. The exponential increase with computers in collecting, storing, and processing data has resulted in a tremendous volume of data. This data is useless unless it is put into some form such as a chart or graph giving some perspective on it. Information designers--what the individuals whose designs are seen in this book are called--create forms to capture aspects of information for the knowledge, reference, and use of individuals in different fields. These information designers design forms for information somewhat like architects now use computer technology to design a house to its future owner's specifications. Polls in political campaigns of any significant scale such as U.S. presidential campaigns are one type of familiar information gathering and information use. Polls' practical uses are obvious. They can inform candidate's about fundamental matters such as which issues to address, how to spend advertising funds, and where to make appearances.<BR/><BR/>Pie charts, line graphs, and diagrams are still used by information designers. Though these are oftentimes considerably more complex than the simple, rather skeletal ones of decades past. Today's information designers more often devise complex, multilayered, and multicolored representations which can be almost any shape and often look like a kind of op-art. New words are required for the designers to create and users to grasp the new information designs. The term "mining information" has been around for a while to connote how business and government organizations and the designers deal with masses of information. "Infotecture" is a term used for the new visual shapes for rendering volumes of information literate according to desired criteria. Readers will also learn about the newer terms of datalogy, datablocks, datasphere, datanets, and datascape which are general types of infotectures that have just about replaced the older pie charts, graphs, and such. Datanoid is a new term for designs for information on different physical, biological, medical, etc., aspects of the human body and human life. With each of the general categories of the new information designs is an interview with a leading designer. The captions for each design explain the information it is designed to make intelligible. The index contains contacts for each of the 90 or so designers whose works are featured.<BR/><BR/>The collection of hundreds of graphic designs for information brings one right up to date in this field. Like computers, globalization, and cell phones, data design--infotecture--is an element of today's complex, technology-based, interconnected world. Manufacturers in China, government agencies in Washington, and growing communities are among the kinds of diverse, widely--scattered organizations making use of it.

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