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Daughter of China
     

Daughter of China

5.0 1
by C. Hope Flinchbaugh, Hope Flinchbaugh, C Hope Flinchbaugh
 
Tapping into her vast reservoir of knowledge about the persecuted church, author Hope Flinchbaugh has crafted a spellbinding first novel set in modern China. Nineteen-year-old Mai Lin has two serious handicaps in Chinese society--being born a girl, and worse, choosing to become a Christian. But she dreams of attending Shanghai University....The poignant, uplifting

Overview

Tapping into her vast reservoir of knowledge about the persecuted church, author Hope Flinchbaugh has crafted a spellbinding first novel set in modern China. Nineteen-year-old Mai Lin has two serious handicaps in Chinese society--being born a girl, and worse, choosing to become a Christian. But she dreams of attending Shanghai University....The poignant, uplifting story that follows is a triumph of love and courage and a tribute to all who stand for their faith in the face of great odds.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Nonfiction might have been a better vehicle for the story told in this debut inspirational novel by Flinchbaugh, who has reported on the plight of persecuted Christians around the world for several religious magazines. Her first-person fictional account of 19-year-old Kwan Mei Lin chronicles religious oppression, discrimination against women and the horrific conditions of orphanages in China. The novel kicks off as Mei Lin dreams of escaping poverty and Communist oppression in Tanching Village by getting a university education. Her Christian faith soon gets her into trouble with local authorities, and her fervent evangelistic efforts land her in a dismal prison. When she convinces the guards to let her clean other prisoners' cells, Mei Lin subversively shares her faith, and multiple conversions follow. After a miraculous release, she helps a young girl who has escaped from a Shanghai orphanage to find a new life of freedom, resulting in yet another conversion. The novel offers some nice details of Chinese culture and several poignant scenes of abandoned and neglected children. Despite the emotional themes, however, the overall tone is surprisingly passionless and stilted because of long passages of dialogue. Many of the conversions seem simplistic or contrived, and the suspense never builds to anything more than a gentle concern for the characters. In the end, the novel succeeds as a plea for Christians to better understand the church's situation in China, but fails to offer a compelling literary story. (Sept.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764227318
Publisher:
Bethany House Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/2002
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Hope Flinchbaugh is a wife, mother, and freelance writer covering the international persecuted church, revivals, and family issues for adults, teens and children for magazines such as Christianity Today, Charisma, Campus Life and Focus on the Family. She resides in Pennsylvania.

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Daughter of China 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
PCov More than 1 year ago
I loved this novel! Through it I vicariously traveled to modern-day China and experienced the heroine's dilemma. Poignant and thought-provoking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a Childerns pastor daughter. I thought we had it really easy over here in America. I was so surpised of what Mei Lin did in the prison and just life. She was never scared of her choice to be a Christian. With me being a pastors kid I want didn't reazile that it was that hard in other countries other then america. It made me realize that I want to be a better person and a Christian while I'm at.