Daughters of Eve by Lois Duncan, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Daughters of Eve

Daughters of Eve

3.9 39
by Lois Duncan
     
 

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The girls at Modesta High School feel like they're stuck in some anti-feminist time warp-they're faced with sexism at every turn, and they've had enough. Sponsored by their new art teacher, Ms. Stark, they band together to form the Daughters of Eve. It's more than a school club-it's a secret society, a sisterhood. At first, it seems like they are actually changing

Overview

The girls at Modesta High School feel like they're stuck in some anti-feminist time warp-they're faced with sexism at every turn, and they've had enough. Sponsored by their new art teacher, Ms. Stark, they band together to form the Daughters of Eve. It's more than a school club-it's a secret society, a sisterhood. At first, it seems like they are actually changing the way guys at school treat them. But Ms. Stark urges them to take more vindictive action, and it starts to feel more like revenge-brutal revenge. Blinded by their oath of loyalty, the Daughters of Eve become instruments of vengeance. Can one of them break the spell before real tragedy strikes?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Heidi Quist
The lives of ten girls and one renegade teacher come together as they join the exclusive and secretive school service club, "Daughter of Eve." In their small town in Michigan, the girls come from different family situations, and different teen struggles. But each girl encounters friends and family members with varying degrees of sexism, from verbal abuse to extreme physical abuse. The school leadership, too, seems to carry some outdated behaviors and attitudes, particularly in their attitudes towards sports. But the girls' leader, Miss Irene Stark is not shy about educating her girls, her sisterhood, regarding their need to stand up for themselves. Unfortunately, her negative experiences with men have built up a rankness in her that leads to not only encouraging but also abetting the girls in violence and destruction both against people and a lot of expensive classroom equipment. Fortunately, Duncan provides some balance by depicting male characters with positive attitudes about gender, as well as by having some of the girls involved see reality more clearly than their leader. The ending, however, left me unsatisfied. By leaving so many threads unfinished, Duncan was most likely aiming for discussion and deep thinking about the issues she addressed. But with the little she offers about the individuals' statuses three years following, the one-word description I would give the book would be disturbing. Having lived a bit longer than three years past high school, I can also say the number is really meaningless for any kind of results-focused conclusions, and therefore she offers insufficient material for the young readers to discuss and understand the ramifications of certain behaviors. Regarding the narration, Gibel's voice is appropriate for the book. However, the difficulty inherent in an audio of finding earlier references to individual characters combined with Duncan's attempt to address so many lives make it difficult to keep track of all the characters' stories. Some listeners will also want to be aware that there is a significant use of foul language. Available in multiple formats including CDs (), Playaway (), and Digital (). Reviewer: Heidi Quist

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316098977
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
10/03/2011
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
458,971
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

"The meeting will come to order."  Fran Schneider raised the small wooden gavel and brought it down upon the tabletop with a sharp click.  She nodded toward the partially open door.  "Will somebody pull that closed, please?  Thank you, Tammy.  Now, let us all join hands and repeat the club pledge."

Hands reached out on all sides around the art room table and closed upon other hands, and a chorus of solemn voices rose softly to recite the words:

"I pledge myself to the spirit of sisterhood--and to warmth of friendship.  I promise to do my best--as a member of the Daughters of Eve-- to follow the code of loyalty, love and service--laid out for womankind since time's beginning--and to divulge to no one words spoken in confidence--within this sacred circle."

There was a moment of silence.  Then the hands released each other, and there was a shuffle of bodies shifting position to sit back more comfortably in the hard, straight-backed chairs.

Something is wrong.

Wrong, how?

I don't know.  I can't put my finger on it.

Then it can't be anything very important, can it?

It was a habit of Tammy Carncross's to have discussions with herself within her head.  Sometimes she felt there must really be two parts of her, two distinct personalities, one the thinking part, one going strictly on emotions.  As she sat now, silent, watching the initiation take place, the two voices within her head picked back and forth at each other like bickering children, and Tammy longed to tell them, "Hush.  Be quiet.  I'm trying to enjoy the ceremony."

The shades at the art-room windows had been drawn, and three white candles had been lighted.  Before them, Fran had placed an open Bible from which she read aloud:  

"And Ruth said, 'Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee:  for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God."

It was a moving ceremony.  The three new members stood with bent heads, and the light from the candles flickered softly upon their faces and threw leaping shadows on the far wall.

"Such is the spirit of sisterhood--"

Something is wrong.

You have no reason for thinking that.

I have this feeling--

What could it be--?

And then she saw it, thick and dark, dripping from one of the candles like melted wax.  The word flashed through her mind like a high-pitched scream--BLOOD!

Could nobody else see it?  Evidently not.  Or perhaps they simply did not want to see.

  

Meet the Author

Lois Duncan is an acclaimed suspense author for young adults. She has published nearly 50 books for children, including I Know What You Did Last Summer, which was adapted into a highly-successful horror film, and Who Killed My Daughter?, a non-fiction book about the harrowing experience of her daughter's murder.

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