Daughters of Rome (Empress of Rome Series #2)

( 36 )

Overview

A.D. 69. The Roman Empire is up for the taking. The Year of Four Emperors will change everything-especially the lives of two sisters with a very personal stake in the outcome. Elegant and ambitious, Cornelia embodies the essence of the perfect Roman wife. She lives to one day see her loyal husband as Emperor. Her sister Marcella is more aloof, content to witness history rather than make it. But when a bloody coup turns their world upside-down, both women must maneuver carefully just to stay alive. As Cornelia ...

See more details below
Paperback
$11.82
BN.com price
(Save 21%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (58) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $1.99   
  • Used (45) from $1.99   
Daughters of Rome (Empress of Rome Series #2)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

A.D. 69. The Roman Empire is up for the taking. The Year of Four Emperors will change everything-especially the lives of two sisters with a very personal stake in the outcome. Elegant and ambitious, Cornelia embodies the essence of the perfect Roman wife. She lives to one day see her loyal husband as Emperor. Her sister Marcella is more aloof, content to witness history rather than make it. But when a bloody coup turns their world upside-down, both women must maneuver carefully just to stay alive. As Cornelia tries to pick up the pieces of her shattered dreams, Marcella discovers a hidden talent for influencing the most powerful men in Rome. In the end, though, there can only be one Emperor...and one Empress.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Quinn's follow-up to last year's Mistress of Rome focuses on four Roman women: Cornelia, the "perfect Roman wife," is poised to become the next empress; her sister, Marcella, is a historian with a budding appetite for manipulating powerful men; cousin Lollia finds herself constantly bartered off to different influential men, though only her slave truly knows her heart; and cousin Diana lives for the excitement of the chariot races. Quinn sets her novel in the "Year of the Four Emperors," A.D. 69, a tumultuous time of shifting loyalties. What unfolds is a soap opera of biblical proportions: when Otho deposes Emperor Galba, Cornelia's husband loses his head—literally; Marcella steps in to pull Galba's strings, but future emperor Domitian keeps an adoring, if untrusting, eye on her. All four women must make major sacrifices and risk losing everything—including their lives. Quinn's prequel lacks the darkness of her debut, but not the intensity. She juggles protagonists with ease and nicely traces the evolution of Marcella—her most compelling character—from innocuous historian to evil manipulator. Readers will become thoroughly immersed in this chaotic period of Roman history. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
"Readers will become thoroughly immersed in this chaotic period of Roman history. " —-Publishers Weekly
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425238974
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/5/2011
  • Series: Empress of Rome Series, #2
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 254,463
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

AudioFile Earphones Award winner Elizabeth Wiley is a seasoned actor, dialect coach, theater professor, and dedicated narrator. She brings over twenty-five years of award-winning acting and voice experience to the studio to create memorable, compelling storytelling.
Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

INTRODUCTION

A.D. 69. Nero is dead. The Roman Empire is up for the taking. With bloodshed spilling out of the palace and on to the streets, chaos has become a way of life for Rome. The Year of Four Emperors will change everything—especially the lives of one family with a very personal stake in the outcome.

Cornelia embodies the essence of the proper Roman wife. She patiently waits to one day see her loyal husband as Emperor of Rome, but instead witnesses his brutal demise at the hands of the Praetorian guard. Her sister Marcella is content merely to watch the politics and turmoil, until she discovers she has more of a penchant for shaping history then for writing about it. And while their cousins Lollia and Diana are both beautiful girls, they each come to find that beauty and wealth cannot quell the desires of the heart. But when a bloody coup turns their world upside-down, each of these women must maneuver carefully just to stay alive…

ABOUT KATE QUINN

Kate Quinn is a native of Southern California. She attended Boston University, where she earned a bachelor's and master's degree in Classical Voice. A lifelong history buff, she first got hooked on ancient Rome while watching I, Claudius at the age of eight. Her first novel, Mistress of Rome, has been translated into multiple languages. Kate lives in California with her husband.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  • In the opening prophecy Nessus has a vision of the future: "Clear as day he saw widowhood for three of the four girls; a fair amount of misery for one and fame for another; a total of eleven husbands and eight children between them—and of course, that one little hand spilling over with blood" (p. 4). Discuss the foreshadowing in this event. Which Cornelia did you think the bloodied hand belonged to? Which girl do you think saw misery and which one saw fame?
  • As the story develops, the relationship between Cornelia and her sister Marcella begins to change. How would you describe their relationship at the beginning of the book? Do you think that they have any unresolved issues? At which point does their relationship begin to change?
  • What are your first impressions of Lollia? At the beginning of the novel she gets into a heated argument with Cornelia because she buys a body slave from the market. But when there is a massive flood in the city, she is giving out money and food to the refugees and thinking: "I might like my parties and pleasures when times are good, but at least I know how to roll up my sleeves when necessary" (p. 133). What do you think this says about her character? Do you think Lollia changes at all throughout the novel? If so, how?
  • The relationship between Lollia and her grandfather is a complicated one. He often uses his granddaughter to acquire a better position in society through her various marriages—depending on who is favorable at the time. How do you think Lollia feels about this? Do you think that this is one of the reasons she bought Thrax, her body slave?
  • After he is released from prison, Marcella has a conversation with Marcus Norbanus, in which he tells Marcella the following: "I've always liked you, Marcella—you're an intelligent woman, after all, and I like intelligent women. But I find I don't like you anymore, and I don't precisely know why. Perhaps it's just my feeling that you're a schemer" (p. 328). Why do you think he perceives her in this way? Do you think that his perceptions of Marcella are correct?
  • Do you think that it's possible that Marcella really did influence the decisions of three different Emperors the way that Diana claims? Do you think that Marcella's actions shaped the events in ancient Rome in any way? What do you think was a coincidence and what was planned by Marcella?
  • Discuss the changes in Cornelia throughout the novel. She begins the year of Four Emperors expecting to be named the wife to the future Emperor of Rome, but ends up widowed and without the security she had become accustomed to. How do you think her husband's death changed her? Do you think she still would have ended up with Drusus if she had not been widowed?
  • Throughout the book the youngest cousin, Diana, seems to be obsessed with nothing but horses, yet at the end of the novel it becomes apparent that she has been paying much closer attention to her cousins' activities than anyone thought. What are your observations about Diana? What do you think she picked up on that the other girls overlooked? And why do you think she keeps her perceptions to herself until the end? Uncle Paris creates busts of each of the four Cornelias depicted as goddesses: Cornelia as Vesta, the goddess of hearth and home; Lollia as Ceres, the goddess of the earth and the harvest; Diana as Diana the Huntress, the virgin goddess of the moon and the hunt; and Marcella as Eris, the goddess of discord and chaos. Why do you think each woman is represented this way? When do you think he began creating the statues and what do you think it means?
  • There were many strong men portrayed throughout this boo. From Lollia's gentle slave, Thrax, to Cornelia's caring guard Drusus, to Diana's strong-willed and moody Llyn, and to Marcella's opinionated and domineering Domitian. Describe their differences and similarities. How do the men in the novel shape each of the women? Do you think that Cornelia, Marcella, Lollia, and Diana would have faced different outcomes if they were not involved with these men?
  • At the end of the novel, Marcella walks through the streets of Rome as the Empress, just as she desired. What do you think her life is like? Do you feel sorry for her or do you think that she got what she deserved? Has there ever been something that you desired in life that—once you acquired it—was not as great as you thought it would be?
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Disappointing as a Prequel

    If I could have given this book three and a half stars instead of four, I would have. Although I ended up really liking Daughters of Rome, for the first half of the book I found it very disappointing. I rushed out to buy this novel the day it was released because I'd been so blown away by Kate Quinn's Mistress of Rome. Since this was that book's prequel I figured it would be similarly original, dark, and suspenseful. When I started to read it I realized this wasn't the case. First off, Daughters of Rome lacked the engaging storytelling of Mistress of Rome. What I loved a lot about Quinn's first novel was the successful use of different voices and types of narration to tell the story. Daughters was limited to the third person, although it followed several characters around in this way. The storyline was that it is A.D. 69, a tumultuous period in ancient Rome, when Imperial power was switching hands faster than the seasons could change. Cornelia, a proper Roman matron with dreams of being Empress, and her sister Marcella, an aspiring historian, try to stay afloat amidst all the assassination and intrigue. Their cousins, the scandalous Lollia and the horse-obsessed Diana are also swept up by the events of that year and are trying to survive. For the first half of the book I can't really say I liked any of the characters. The plot lagged. There wasn't a lot going on in the story to distract from how selfish and scheming Marcella was and how Cornelia was passive and unexciting. Halfway through however, the story picked up and I became invested in the characters Cornelia and Lollia, while the danger felt more imminent. It was fun to recognize familiar characters from Mistress of Rome and to see how the stage was set for the events of that novel. There could have been less details of horse races at the Circus Maximus and more about Domitian, a character I found very interesting. But Daughters had some heart-pounding romances and an exhilarating climax. It was also clearly well-researched and the historical details were superb. In the end it was well worth reading and I definitely recommend it to Kate Quinn fans.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 21, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Wow

    This book takes historical fiction to the next level. The characters are very well developed, if you have had any interactions with sisters or female cousins, then you will more than likely be able to relate to these characters even though they live two thousand years ago. The plot is well researched with people who actually existed in that time period. If you have read Mistress of Rome this will answer a lot of questions. The format of this nookbook is well done also, no annoying typos or grammatical errors that I noticed.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 6, 2011

    Disappointing!

    Kate Quinn's first book was rather good and I looked forward to the release of Daughters of Rome. I have to say, though, that this book just didn't grab my attention.

    I found myself going back a lot to see what I'd missed. A character might lie on a couch without ever having entered a room, and I'd ask "Wait, when did he/she get there?" Or a character might be on a horse one moment, and then magically stomping away the next without ever having dismounted. Little things like that make me crazy!

    Also, the characters just didn't have any real personality. What minimal personality they were given was inconsistent throughout. Lollia was initially presented as thoughtless and flighty, prone to ignoring her daughter, but as the book progressed she was portrayed as almost "mother of the year".

    In all, this book was a waste of $9.99. If I'd gotten this as a free book I wouldn't have finished it, but I figured I owed it to myself since I'd shelled out money. Kate Quinn looked like a promising author with her first book, but from now on I'll avoid her work until I'm convinced she's slowed down and taken her work more seriously.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This work of biographical fiction looks closely at the impact of the 'Year of the Four Emperors" had on four women

    In 69 A.D. Cornelia is the paragon of a Roman politician's wife as she expects to one day soon become the empress. Their cousin Lollia is used by men in the family as a pawn to gain favors with the affluent. Another cousin Diana chooses to stay out of the elite arena as her preference is as a spectator at chariot racing.

    Otho leads a bloody coup that ends with the Emperor Galba dead after a reign of seven months following Nero's suicide. Cornelia's dream died with her spouse. Marcella must adapt having manipulated Galba. All four females struggle to survive as two more emperors follow in the "Year of the Four Emperors."

    This work of biographical fiction looks closely at the impact of the 'Year of the Four Emperors" had on four women. Each of the women is fully developed while the men in their lives serve as background catalysts on the feminist stage. The two sisters are fascinating protagonists turned to antagonists as Cornelia mourns what she felt was her divine right lost with her husband's death and Marcella turns from historian to Machiavellian emperor maker and breaker. The cousins are fully developed but less influential. A prequel to the author's Mistress of Rome, ancient historical fiction fans will enjoy this intriguing look at the disorderly first year after Nero's death.

    Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 21, 2013

    good summer read

    I picked Mistress of Rome (another book in this series) off the recommended table at my local B & N and really enjoyed it Daughters is kind of a prequel.If you enjoy historical fiction, you will really like it. The third book Empress of the Seven Hills is also very good. Kate Quinn doesn't get overly graphic with sex or violence like most writers do with ancient Rome. She concentrates more on the characters and relationships.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    A trip down the History

    Two Sister... Four Emperors... An empire... Quite the game.... A good read... Too bad I finished in just one day.... I really need to stop reading so fast.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 27, 2011

    outstanding

    great book

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2011

    Engaging, fast-paced read

    Thoroughly researched fictional account of the year of four emperors. Great characters and plot.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2013

    Best series ever !

    If you love ancient Rome, this is the book for you. You won't be able to put this book down. I have read all the books, can wait for the next one !!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Gripping Historical Fiction

    This is the second of three books in the trilogy and my favorite. I thoroughly enjoyed following the three sisters in this book and the ever-changing politics of ancient Rome. Good character and plot development. Definitely recommend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Seemless story weaving with historical events

    I read Mistress of Rome when it first came out. I fell in love with Quinn's characters, writing style and story-telling. I had been waiting anxiously for Daughters of Rome to come out. So anxious, when my nook broke, I didn't hesitate to buy the paperback before waiting for my nook to be fixed! (And I LOVE reading from my nook.) Daughters of Rome followed the development of three related women during the Year of the Four Emperors. Quinn seamlessly pulls facts into fiction and is able to develop the main characters as well as add interested secondary characters. Fantastic read, hard to put down and makes you want to read or reread Mistress of Rome to follow the story of Domitian.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 17, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    I love the way Kate Quinn writes. This book is a very good read! I only have one problem and that is that I wish she had added one more chapter. :) I love LOVE love ancient Roman life and Quinn captures the spirit and really makes the story jumo off the page! it's as if your a fly on the wall of these 4 cousins lives.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)