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Daughters of Rome (Empress of Rome Series #2)
     

Daughters of Rome (Empress of Rome Series #2)

3.8 39
by Kate Quinn
 

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A.D. 69. The Roman Empire is up for the taking. The Year of Four Emperors will change everything-especially the lives of two sisters with a very personal stake in the outcome. Elegant and ambitious, Cornelia embodies the essence of the perfect Roman wife. She lives to one day see her loyal husband as Emperor. Her sister Marcella is more aloof, content to witness

Overview

A.D. 69. The Roman Empire is up for the taking. The Year of Four Emperors will change everything-especially the lives of two sisters with a very personal stake in the outcome. Elegant and ambitious, Cornelia embodies the essence of the perfect Roman wife. She lives to one day see her loyal husband as Emperor. Her sister Marcella is more aloof, content to witness history rather than make it. But when a bloody coup turns their world upside-down, both women must maneuver carefully just to stay alive. As Cornelia tries to pick up the pieces of her shattered dreams, Marcella discovers a hidden talent for influencing the most powerful men in Rome. In the end, though, there can only be one Emperor...and one Empress.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Quinn's follow-up to last year's Mistress of Rome focuses on four Roman women: Cornelia, the "perfect Roman wife," is poised to become the next empress; her sister, Marcella, is a historian with a budding appetite for manipulating powerful men; cousin Lollia finds herself constantly bartered off to different influential men, though only her slave truly knows her heart; and cousin Diana lives for the excitement of the chariot races. Quinn sets her novel in the "Year of the Four Emperors," A.D. 69, a tumultuous time of shifting loyalties. What unfolds is a soap opera of biblical proportions: when Otho deposes Emperor Galba, Cornelia's husband loses his head—literally; Marcella steps in to pull Galba's strings, but future emperor Domitian keeps an adoring, if untrusting, eye on her. All four women must make major sacrifices and risk losing everything—including their lives. Quinn's prequel lacks the darkness of her debut, but not the intensity. She juggles protagonists with ease and nicely traces the evolution of Marcella—her most compelling character—from innocuous historian to evil manipulator. Readers will become thoroughly immersed in this chaotic period of Roman history. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
"Readers will become thoroughly immersed in this chaotic period of Roman history. " —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425238974
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/05/2011
Series:
Empress of Rome Series , #2
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
652,596
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
“A soap opera of biblical proportions . . . [Quinn] juggles protagonists with ease and nicely traces the evolution of Marcella—her most compelling character—from innocuous historian to manipulator. Readers will become thoroughly immersed in this chaotic period of Roman history.”—Publishers Weekly

“Touches on every factor during this time: politics, war, extravagant parties, greed, and love. I definitely would recommend this book to those who love ancient Rome.”—All Things Historical Fiction

Daughters of Rome has an appealing symmetry—the succession of four emperors, the alternating narratives of the four cousins—and strikes an authentic balance between poetic justice and harsh reality. . . . This second book stands on its own two feet, and offers a compelling experience of one of the most turbulent years of the Roman Empire.”—Historical Novel Society

“A fascinating view of four women during the year of the four emperors. . . . Regardless of whether you already have an interest in Roman history, Daughters of Rome will fascinate you from beginning to end.”—BookLoons

“Quinn elegantly captures the Ancient Roman world and the collective undercurrent of panic felt by the populace during the ‘Year of Four Emperors.’ Her characters are alluring and her understanding of Ancient Rome insightful.”—Luxury Reading

“The two sisters are fascinating protagonists . . . Ancient historical fiction fans will enjoy this intriguing look at the disorderly first year after Nero’s death.”—Midwest Book Review
 

Meet the Author

Kate Quinn is a native of Southern California. She attended Boston University, where she earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in classical voice. A lifelong history buff, she first got hooked on ancient Rome while watching I, Claudius at the age of eight. She is the author of the Empress of Rome saga, including Lady of the Eternal CityEmpress of the Seven HillsDaughters of Rome, and Mistress of Rome, as well as two novels about the Borgia family, The Serpent and the Pearl and The Lion and the Rose.

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Daughters of Rome 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
dholland08 More than 1 year ago
If I could have given this book three and a half stars instead of four, I would have. Although I ended up really liking Daughters of Rome, for the first half of the book I found it very disappointing. I rushed out to buy this novel the day it was released because I'd been so blown away by Kate Quinn's Mistress of Rome. Since this was that book's prequel I figured it would be similarly original, dark, and suspenseful. When I started to read it I realized this wasn't the case. First off, Daughters of Rome lacked the engaging storytelling of Mistress of Rome. What I loved a lot about Quinn's first novel was the successful use of different voices and types of narration to tell the story. Daughters was limited to the third person, although it followed several characters around in this way. The storyline was that it is A.D. 69, a tumultuous period in ancient Rome, when Imperial power was switching hands faster than the seasons could change. Cornelia, a proper Roman matron with dreams of being Empress, and her sister Marcella, an aspiring historian, try to stay afloat amidst all the assassination and intrigue. Their cousins, the scandalous Lollia and the horse-obsessed Diana are also swept up by the events of that year and are trying to survive. For the first half of the book I can't really say I liked any of the characters. The plot lagged. There wasn't a lot going on in the story to distract from how selfish and scheming Marcella was and how Cornelia was passive and unexciting. Halfway through however, the story picked up and I became invested in the characters Cornelia and Lollia, while the danger felt more imminent. It was fun to recognize familiar characters from Mistress of Rome and to see how the stage was set for the events of that novel. There could have been less details of horse races at the Circus Maximus and more about Domitian, a character I found very interesting. But Daughters had some heart-pounding romances and an exhilarating climax. It was also clearly well-researched and the historical details were superb. In the end it was well worth reading and I definitely recommend it to Kate Quinn fans.
megWREN More than 1 year ago
This book takes historical fiction to the next level. The characters are very well developed, if you have had any interactions with sisters or female cousins, then you will more than likely be able to relate to these characters even though they live two thousand years ago. The plot is well researched with people who actually existed in that time period. If you have read Mistress of Rome this will answer a lot of questions. The format of this nookbook is well done also, no annoying typos or grammatical errors that I noticed.
MinnesotaHoser More than 1 year ago
I picked Mistress of Rome (another book in this series) off the recommended table at my local B & N and really enjoyed it Daughters is kind of a prequel.If you enjoy historical fiction, you will really like it. The third book Empress of the Seven Hills is also very good. Kate Quinn doesn't get overly graphic with sex or violence like most writers do with ancient Rome. She concentrates more on the characters and relationships.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Two Sister... Four Emperors... An empire... Quite the game.... A good read... Too bad I finished in just one day.... I really need to stop reading so fast.
Leslie Hinton More than 1 year ago
Thoroughly researched fictional account of the year of four emperors. Great characters and plot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the second of three books in the trilogy and my favorite. I thoroughly enjoyed following the three sisters in this book and the ever-changing politics of ancient Rome. Good character and plot development. Definitely recommend.
AlisaLorrine More than 1 year ago
I read Mistress of Rome when it first came out. I fell in love with Quinn's characters, writing style and story-telling. I had been waiting anxiously for Daughters of Rome to come out. So anxious, when my nook broke, I didn't hesitate to buy the paperback before waiting for my nook to be fixed! (And I LOVE reading from my nook.) Daughters of Rome followed the development of three related women during the Year of the Four Emperors. Quinn seamlessly pulls facts into fiction and is able to develop the main characters as well as add interested secondary characters. Fantastic read, hard to put down and makes you want to read or reread Mistress of Rome to follow the story of Domitian.
Angela89 More than 1 year ago
I love the way Kate Quinn writes. This book is a very good read! I only have one problem and that is that I wish she had added one more chapter. :) I love LOVE love ancient Roman life and Quinn captures the spirit and really makes the story jumo off the page! it's as if your a fly on the wall of these 4 cousins lives.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 69 A.D. Cornelia is the paragon of a Roman politician's wife as she expects to one day soon become the empress. Their cousin Lollia is used by men in the family as a pawn to gain favors with the affluent. Another cousin Diana chooses to stay out of the elite arena as her preference is as a spectator at chariot racing. Otho leads a bloody coup that ends with the Emperor Galba dead after a reign of seven months following Nero's suicide. Cornelia's dream died with her spouse. Marcella must adapt having manipulated Galba. All four females struggle to survive as two more emperors follow in the "Year of the Four Emperors." This work of biographical fiction looks closely at the impact of the 'Year of the Four Emperors" had on four women. Each of the women is fully developed while the men in their lives serve as background catalysts on the feminist stage. The two sisters are fascinating protagonists turned to antagonists as Cornelia mourns what she felt was her divine right lost with her husband's death and Marcella turns from historian to Machiavellian emperor maker and breaker. The cousins are fully developed but less influential. A prequel to the author's Mistress of Rome, ancient historical fiction fans will enjoy this intriguing look at the disorderly first year after Nero's death. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have always been a fan of Ancient Egypt as well as Ancient Rome. That being said, I purchased this ebook by Kate Quinn with excitement, knowing that all of her other stories set in Ancient Rome were phenominal. However this story was cut and dry. The characters lacked personality and at the end I felt no connection with any of them. This story was painful to finish.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lord is this book terrible, slow plot, boring characters and no end in sight. I am 150 pages in and it's a task to keep reading.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you love ancient Rome, this is the book for you. You won't be able to put this book down. I have read all the books, can wait for the next one !!
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