Daughters Who Walk This Path [NOOK Book]

Overview

SPIRITED AND INTELLIGENT, MORAYO grows up surrounded by school friends and family in busy, modern-day Ibadan. An adoring little sister, their traditional parents, and a host of aunties and cousins make Morayo’s home their own. So there’s nothing unusual about her charming but troubled cousin Bros T moving in with the family. At first Morayo and her sister are delighted, but ...
See more details below
Daughters Who Walk This Path

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

SPIRITED AND INTELLIGENT, MORAYO grows up surrounded by school friends and family in busy, modern-day Ibadan. An adoring little sister, their traditional parents, and a host of aunties and cousins make Morayo’s home their own. So there’s nothing unusual about her charming but troubled cousin Bros T moving in with the family. At first Morayo and her sister are delighted, but in her innocence, nothing prepares Morayo for the shameful secret Bros T forces upon her.



Thrust into a web of oppressive silence woven by the adults around her, Morayo must learn to protect herself and her sister from a legacy of silence shared by the women in her family. Only her Aunt Morenike provides Morayo with a safe home and a sense of female community that sustains her as she develops into a young woman in bustling, politically charged, often violent Nigeria.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
02/25/2013
The perils of growing up female are amplified by the social and political inequalities of modern day Nigeria in Kilanko's debut novel, a coming-of-age story about Morayo, who lives comfortably with her family in the town of Ibadan, where the threat of violence lingers, seemingly around every corner. In this male-dominated setting, Morayo and her little sister Eniayo are thrilled when charming older cousin, Bros T, moves into the expanding household. With his good looks and persuasiveness, Bros T seems capable of sweet talking his way out of anything. As he gets closer to the family though, Morayo learns of the destructive potential of his charismatic smile. Unable to speak openly about the torment of Bros T to her conservative family, Morayo withdraws into a protective shell until she discovers a kindred soul in her Aunty Morenike. With a dark past of her own, Aunty is the only one Morayo feels comfortable opening up to in a repressed social climate unwilling to recognize these all-too-common struggles of female adolescence. Although Kilanko's background in social work is used to good effect, her characters' pain never becomes truly palpable, and the overly precious, wooden prose cannot withstand the more serious issues the novel broaches. (Feb.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143183990
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/29/2013
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 424,909
  • File size: 378 KB

Meet the Author


Yejide Kilanko was born in Ibadan, Nigeria, the daughter of a university professor and his wife. She married an American computer programmer, and immigrated to Laurel, Maryland. Kilanko is now a social worker in children’s mental health and lives in Canada. Daughters Who Walk This Path is her first novel.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Secrets

    Morayo lives in Nigeria. She's a protective sister with a secret. Once the secret is revealed, the situation is never discussed. The family is expected to continue as if nothing happened. Does the secret affect any of the family members?

    “Daughters Who Walk This Path” is a great debut. I felt a range of emotions. Morayo is someone I know who experienced a traumatic ordeal. Yejide Kilanko takes you on a journey. As with anyone who experiences trauma, they have their days. Despite the low points in Morayo's life, I enjoyed reading such a testimony. Instead of succumbing to her circumstances, she moved forward.

    The characters meshed well together. Morayo was surrounded by family and friends. Besides Morayo, I loved Morenike. She was an aunt and was there for her niece. They have a close relationship. I would highly recommend this book to those who can appreciate a relatable experience.

    Reviewed by: Jas

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This story follows the life of Morayo, a young girl growing up i

    This story follows the life of Morayo, a young girl growing up in the city of Ibadan. Her little sister Eniayo is albino, and she has to deal with a certain amount of ridicule and discrimination due to her condition, especially since it is believed that albino children bring bad luck, or are a symbol of God's punishment on the family.

    There is a tragic event involving Morayo and her cousin Bros T which leaves her world shaken, but she recovers with the help of her aunt Morenike, who herself suffered a tragic event as a teenager.

    I loved the way this book gave me a taste of the culture and lifestyles of the people of Nigeria. There is a formality to relationships, and I found myself sort of enamored with the way that the younger people bow down and prostrate themselves in greeting and respect to their elders. Even the way that wives and husbands refer to one another.

    My final word: A sweet and tragic exploration of the Nigerian culture through the eyes of a young girl growing into a woman.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)