David Brinkley: A Memoir by David Brinkley, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
David Brinkley: A Memoir

David Brinkley: A Memoir

by David Brinkley
     
 

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THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
"It seems to me now that Huntley's and my success lay mainly in the fact that we were new, as television was new, and we had few competitors. . . . Nearly everything we did had never been done before. . . . What is now commonplace was in its beginning a grand and glorious adventure for the people of our country and the world, a

Overview

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
"It seems to me now that Huntley's and my success lay mainly in the fact that we were new, as television was new, and we had few competitors. . . . Nearly everything we did had never been done before. . . . What is now commonplace was in its beginning a grand and glorious adventure for the people of our country and the world, a vicarious balloon ride into the stars. . . ."
Just how a young man growing up in a small southern town with only one one-hundred-watt A.M. radio station and no network affiliation became one of the world's most respected broadcasters in the nation makes for a "grand and glorious adventure" in itself. Now, in this fascinating and charmingly candid memoir of a career spanning half a century, David Brinkley recollects from his own unique vantage point the remarkable, shaky beginnings of television news, the ever-changing social and political landscape of our country, and the colorful people who have crossed his path. He includes priceless moments playing poker with Harry Truman, riding the rails with Winston Churchill, being whisked off by helicopter to Camp David by Lyndon Johnson, and receiving the distinguished Medal of Freedom from George Bush. From the New Deal to the Contract with America, David Brinkley has seen it all. . . and he knows how to tell a story—especially his own.
"Reading it is like sitting in your living room, having a conversation with this wonderful man. He writes the way he talks, the words flowing easily and comfortably; the book, a wry, elegant, funny, intimate, always interesting, often insightful trip across 75 years."
—The Boston Globe
"A WEALTH OF ANECDOTES."
—SanFrancisco Chronicle
"CHOCK FULL OF GOOD STORIES."
—The Christian Science Monitor
A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK

Editorial Reviews

Mary Elizabeth Williams

The subtitle of David Brinkley's engaging, if idiosyncratic, memoir suggests both the range f the book's contents and its wry tone: 11 Presidents, 4 Wars, 22 Political Conventions, 1 Moon Landing, 3 Assassinations, 2,000 Weeks of News and Other Stuff on Television and 18 years of growing up in North Carolina. This is not so much an autobiography as a loosely organized collection of anecdotes and ruminations, and because its spare prose reproduces the distinctive cadences of Brinkley's speaking voice (is it possible to hear his name and not bring that voice to mind?) reading the book is like spending the evening in the company of an amiable, accomplished storyteller.

And he has wonderful tales to tell. As that subtitle reminds us, Brinkley, one of the most visible and influential television journalists of the past several decades, has covered or commented on most of the major events of in our recent past. What he has to say, about politicians past and present, about the political and social eruptions that have reshaped the country, about the current state of the nation, is almost always interesting, and often startling. But the book is most lively when Brinkley describes, precisely and with wit, the more peculiar features of our political system, including the increasingly odd way in which we select presidential candidates, and the memoir is most moving (and hilarious) when Brinkley recalls his "rich and pungent" boyhood in Wilmington, NC., and the hectic, improvisational nature of news reports in television's early days. -- Salon

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Television newsman Brinkley's look back on his career spent 11 weeks on PW's bestseller list. (Oct.)
Library Journal
In 1967, NBC's Chet Huntley and David Brinkley had long been out-rating CBS's Walter Cronkite with The Huntley-Brinkley Report. How that newscast went off the air only four years later is one of the more intriguing stories in Brinkley's memoirs. Now nearing retirement after almost a decade and a half moderating ABC's This Week with David Brinkley, Brinkley looks back on a career in print and broadcast journalism, including 38 years at NBC. Writing in his familiar clipped, witty voice, he highlights two themes: politics (especially the changing nature of televising political conventions) and the unpredictability of journalism and broadcasting. Particularly good are descriptions of his rise through the frontier years of television and anecdotes about figures such as Jesse Helms, Martin Luther King, and assorted Kennedys. Recommended for journalism and broadcasting collection and libraries owning his best seller, Washington Goes to War (LJ 4/1/88). [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 7/95.]-Bruce Rosenstein, "USA Today" Lib., Arlington, Va.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345374028
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/01/1996
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.75(d)

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