David Crockett: Hero of the Common Man (American Heroes Series)
  • David Crockett: Hero of the Common Man (American Heroes Series)
  • David Crockett: Hero of the Common Man (American Heroes Series)

David Crockett: Hero of the Common Man (American Heroes Series)

by William Groneman
     
 

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Perhaps no other figure in American history is more shrouded in myth and legend than David ("Davy") Crockett, the Tennessee frontiersman whose death at the Alamo in 1836 insured his place in the Valhalla of American heroes.
A gregarious, fun-loving man, Crockett was capable of spinning the tallest of tales, but the truth of his life was far more fascinating than

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Overview

Perhaps no other figure in American history is more shrouded in myth and legend than David ("Davy") Crockett, the Tennessee frontiersman whose death at the Alamo in 1836 insured his place in the Valhalla of American heroes.
A gregarious, fun-loving man, Crockett was capable of spinning the tallest of tales, but the truth of his life was far more fascinating than the myth. His hunting and exploration adventures, his service as a soldier under Andrew Jackson in the Creek Indian War of 1813, his rise in politics to the United States Congress, his incessant search for "elbow room" that took him to Texas - these were the real fabric of a heroic life.
In writing of the historical Crockett, Groneman dispels the myths to discover the genuine hero beneath them. He writes at length of the defense of the Alamo, describes how Crockett's reputation and heroism have been tainted by revisionist historians, and presents new evidence that the Tennessean's heroics during the siege have, if anything, been understated.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Longtime Crockett researcher Groneman cuts through the myth and legend to uncover as much as possible of the real Davy Crockett (1786-1836). What emerges is a fascinating look at a man who was a typical product of western Tennessee: a frontiersman with little formal education, skilled in hunting, always in debt, and always looking for more "elbow room" where he might achieve financial success. Groneman focuses considerable attention on two more remarkable aspects of Crockett's career: his three terms in the U.S. Congress, which made him a national figure, and his service at the Battle of the Alamo, where he was killed. In considering Crockett's death, Groneman's discussion is a bit dated, as he apparently did not have access to James Crisp's Sleuthing the Alamo (2004). Specialists will deplore the lack of notes, but general readers, high school students, and undergraduates will welcome this well-written biography as a good starting point for discovering Crockett as he really was. Recommended for public and undergraduate libraries.-Stephen H. Peters, Northern Michigan Univ. Lib., Marquette Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Hero or opportunist? Rebel or terrorist? Did he even own a coonskin cap? Davy Crockett was an enigma in his own age-and certainly the right man in the wrong place at the wrong time. Retired New York City firefighter Groneman, a veteran of the 9/11 attacks, recognizes that a vast mythmaking enterprise underlay Davy Crockett's ascent to the status of cultural hero; one series, Davy Crockett's Almanacs, ran to 45 volumes "of increasingly violent tall tales" and was wildly successful, though, Groneman notes, Crockett made nothing from it. His elevation seems unlikely, for Crockett started off life under a father no more violent or drunk than most fathers on the Appalachian frontier, showed no more aptitude for hard work than any of his peers and commanded no more book-learning than a farmer or freighter or trapper. Still, he distinguished himself by a certain stoical unflappability under fire and good humor, which, witnesses recall, he put to good use during the defense of the Alamo, which sealed his reputation once and for all. The mythmaking, too, was a product of its time, for Crockett happened to come along just when the Founding Fathers were dying off and "the American identity was shifting from the Virginia aristocracy to the common man of the Western frontier." In this lean an lucid biography, Groneman portrays more of the complicated, haunted David Crockett that Billy Bob Thornton did in the 2004 film The Alamo than did Fess Parker in the 1950s. And as for the coonskin cap-yes, he wore one. A small survey of many virtues; it holds to the middle ground between hagiography and debunking, making allowances for Crockett's lapses into bad behavior while highlighting his better qualities.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780765310682
Publisher:
Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date:
02/06/2007
Series:
American Heroes Series, #5
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
900,624
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.48(d)

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