Davita's Harp

Davita's Harp

4.0 15
by Chaim Potok
     
 

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For Davita Chandal, growing up in the New York of the 1930s and '40s is an experience of joy and sadness. Her loving parents, both fervent radicals, fill her with the fiercely bright hope of a new and better world. But as the deprivations of war and depression take a ruthless toll, Davita unexpectedly turns to the Jewish faith that her mother had long ago abandoned

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Overview

For Davita Chandal, growing up in the New York of the 1930s and '40s is an experience of joy and sadness. Her loving parents, both fervent radicals, fill her with the fiercely bright hope of a new and better world. But as the deprivations of war and depression take a ruthless toll, Davita unexpectedly turns to the Jewish faith that her mother had long ago abandoned, finding there both a solace for her questioning inner pain and a test of her budding spirit of independence.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449911839
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/1996
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
726,060
Product dimensions:
8.06(w) x 11.02(h) x 0.97(d)
Lexile:
750L (what's this?)

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Davita's Harp 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Davita's Harp is an elegant work of art. Potok's ability to tell his stories through the eyes of main characters who are often children is incomparable. Reading Potok is an absolute necessity for students of the new area known as Jewish Studies. Potok's presentation of Jewish supernatural figures such as the witch Baba Yaga, the golem, and the mythic ancestor is an area of research wide open to serious students of his work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I should have read the reviews more closely as this is a book clearly intended for middle school students and high school students. I am 28 and I am not truly enjoying this book, something is missing, I'm about halfway through and the characters are not well developed at all and I still have no idea what the point of this book is yet.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoy the way Chaim Potok gives us a story with such emotion. It is as though the reader can feel the pressures and joys that the young Davita experiences in her life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. I'd say one of his best yet!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Chaim Potok is a brilliant writer who was capable of presenting so many different issues (a young girls search for her identity, religion, politics, the meaning of family, and the struggles of women) in a profoundly touching fashion. I had to read to book for a class in high school and I have reread it several times. Davita is a truly inspiring character in that she is persistant is finding answers to the questions in her life and strong through all of her painful experiences.
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tolife18 More than 1 year ago
The cover intially caught my eye along with the name. An instrument affixed to the door. The story is original with a great plot and characters. I just find the history, the discussions of subjects such as Marxism, Communism, war in Spain slow going and a bit tedious at times. I'm in the middle and enjoying Mr. Potack's revealing details into Ilana Davita's emerging sense of religion. I particularly enjoyed how he allowed her to use her observations from her attendance in an orthodox synagogue to learn more about her Jewish heritage and to astutely point to how the young boys of the school who laugh at her questions do not themselves always ascribe to good Jewish values. Her ability to see their faults truly emphasizes what are meant to be the good intentions, and law, of the 'Jewish people' as a whole. I'm eager to find out what ties some of the main characters together from their past.
Guest More than 1 year ago
very good
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this novel, though at some times the political aspects became very demanding. This is a wonderful book which clearly depicts the life of a girl trying to live in an enviroment where not everything always works out as one might like. We are guided through what the girl longs for and loves, and what she feels about being someone who doesn't always belong.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book over five years ago. It is the only book that has ever touched me enough to make me cry. I am reading My Name is Asher Levv right now as I am afraid to re read Davita's Harp i case I don't cry this time. I highly recommend this book but it wouldhelp if you knew about politicalscience history and judaism. I am a 51 year old white americqn with scandinavian ancestoty.