Dawn: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview



“The author…has built knowledge into artistic fiction.”—The New York Times Book Review


 

Elisha is a young Jewish man, a Holocaust survivor, and an Israeli freedom fighter in British-controlled Palestine; John Dawson is the captured English officer he will murder at dawn in retribution for the British execution of a fellow freedom fighter. The night-long wait for morning and death provides Dawn, Elie Wiesel’s ever more timely novel, with its harrowingly taut, ...

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Dawn: A Novel

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Overview



“The author…has built knowledge into artistic fiction.”—The New York Times Book Review


 

Elisha is a young Jewish man, a Holocaust survivor, and an Israeli freedom fighter in British-controlled Palestine; John Dawson is the captured English officer he will murder at dawn in retribution for the British execution of a fellow freedom fighter. The night-long wait for morning and death provides Dawn, Elie Wiesel’s ever more timely novel, with its harrowingly taut, hour-by-hour narrative. Caught between the manifold horrors of the past and the troubling dilemmas of the present, Elisha wrestles with guilt, ghosts, and ultimately God as he waits for the appointed hour and his act of assassination. Dawn is an eloquent meditation on the compromises, justifications, and sacrifices that human beings make when they murder other human beings.


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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466821163
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 3/21/2006
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 79,227
  • File size: 106 KB

Meet the Author



Elie Wiesel is the author of more than fifty books, including Night, his harrowing account of his experiences in Nazi concentration camps. The book, first published in 1955, was selected for Oprah’s Book Club in 2006. Wiesel is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University, and lives with his family in New York City. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

Biography

"Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed. Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky." Since the publication of this passage in Night, Elie Wiesel has devoted his life to ensuring that the world never forgets the horrors of the Holocaust, and to fostering the hope that they never happen again.

Wiesel was 15 years old when the Nazis invaded his hometown of Sighet, Romania. He and his family were taken to Auschwitz, where his mother and the youngest of his three sisters died. He and his father were later transported to Buchenwald, where his father died shortly before Allied forces liberated the camp in 1945. After the war, Wiesel attended the Sorbonne in Paris and worked for a while as a journalist. He met the Nobel Prize-winning writer Francois Mauriac, who helped persuade Wiesel to break his private vow never to speak of his experiences in the death camps.

During a long recuperation from a car accident in New York City in 1956, Wiesel decided to make his home in the United States. His memoir Night, which appeared two years later (compressed from an earlier, longer work, And the World Remained Silent), was initially met with skepticism. "The Holocaust was not something people wanted to know about in those days," Wiesel later said in a Time magazine interview.

But eventually the book drew recognition and readers. "A slim volume of terrifying power" (The New York Times), Night remains one of the most widely read works on the Holocaust. It was followed by over 40 more books, including novels, essay collections and plays. Wiesel's writings often explore the paradoxes raised by his memories: he finds it impossible to speak about the Holocaust, yet impossible to remain silent; impossible to believe in God, yet impossible not to believe.

Wiesel has also worked to bring attention to the plight of oppressed people around the world. "When human lives are endangered, when human dignity is in jeopardy, national borders and sensitivities become irrelevant," he said in his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. "Wherever men and women are persecuted because of their race, religion, or political views, that place must -- at that moment -- become the center of the universe."

Though lauded by many as a crusader for justice, Wiesel has also been criticized for his part in what some see as the commercialization of the Holocaust. In his 2000 memoir And the Sea Is Never Full, Wiesel shares some of his own qualms about fame and politics, but reiterates what he sees as his duty as a survivor and witness:

''The one among us who would survive would testify for all of us. He would speak and demand justice on our behalf; as our spokesman he would make certain that our memory would penetrate that of humanity. He would do nothing else.''

Good To Know

Use of the term "Holocaust" to describe the extermination of six million Jews and millions of other civilians by the Nazis is widely thought to have originated in Night.

Two of Wiesel's subsequent works , Dawn and The Accident, form a kind of trilogy with Night. "These stories live deeply in all that I have written and all that I am ever going to write," the author has said.

President Jimmy Carter appointed Wiesel to be chairman of the President's Commission on the Holocaust in 1978. In 1980, Wiesel became founding chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He is also the founding president of the Paris-based Universal Academy of Cultures and cofounder of the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity.

Since 1969, Marion Wiesel has translated her husband Elie's books from French into English. They live in New York City and have one son.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Eliezer Wiesel (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 30, 1928
    2. Place of Birth:
      Sighet, Romania
    1. Education:
      La Sorbonne

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

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(14)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2012

    A Gripping, Intense Read that will haunt you long after you've finished reading

    I had to read a historical fiction novel for AP world history, this was one of the books on the list. Having read his first novel, Night a few months ago, I had high expectations for the book when I decided to read it. This book outdoes it's amazing predecessor. It follows the experience of Elisha, a Jewish teenager who survived the holocaust and now has joined the revolution against the English for the Holy Land in Palestine. He has been chosen to perform the execution of a British officer, which is to take place at the same time as a friend of his from their side. The story follows the hours and minutes leading up to the execution, covering topics such as what brands a person as a killer, past regrets, the cost of war, and the loss of one's self. Dawn is a short, but intensely written read with excellent pacing that takes a look into the mind of a person whom is forced to commit the ultimate crime, and how it ties in with the protagonist's dark past. This book was the highlight of my many summer assignments and was a breath of fresh air in the world of required reading which normally is filled with dry, overly descriptive novels which one can find hard to relate to. Dawn was a page turner that kept me highly intriuged from the first page to the final word. The story's deep plot line and haunting ending will have you thinking and questioning your own morale even after you've finished reading.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2014

    Dawn is an amazing book. It is the sequel to Night. To understan

    Dawn is an amazing book. It is the sequel to Night. To understand this book you have to read Night. Wiesel references events from Night quite a bit. Dawn also answers some unanswered questions from Night. The book starts off with Wiesel being in Palestine. He also mentions that he has to kill an English man the next day and he didn’t know why. He says that he will never go back to his home town and officially confirms that he never found his mother. Also in chapter one he brings up the beggar. The man wears black clothes. Wiesel met the man when he was 12 years old. This man taught Wiesel how to distinguish night from day. The rest of the book is when Wiesel was 18 years old. Chapter 2 goes back to right after the war. He went to Paris and that is where he met Gad. He was offered asylum in France. He wanted to learn the language and go to school. Wiesel compares Gad to a god. In chapter 5 we discover Catherine, a possible love interest, who is a 26 year old that spoke little German. She was a person who would talk to him in the summer of the war. The book continues to go through his life after the war. I would recommend this book to young adults. I am planning on reading Day the last book in his series.
    -J. Leavey

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  • Posted April 11, 2011

    A great short follow up to Night by Wiesel

    Dawn is a short story by Wiesel standards but is a story you cannot put down. Elisha is a young rebel in Palestine fighting the British at the time and is torn in that at (Dawn) he must execute a British officer in reprisal for the British hanging a Jewish rebel. Elisha establishes an almost friendship with this officer and the story also talks of Elisha with his rebel friends especially Gad who is almost like a fatherfigure to him. Action packed and a great-short story by Weisel I strongly suggest this read.Can`t wait to finish this triology with Day.

    DNC

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2011

    It can be interesting if you know alot about history!

    I would recomed this book to someone who has been alot through in life, and already knows what to expect from life. I honestly think that this book may get boring, but not just any 18 year old boy like Elie can make this tough decisions of killing or waiting to be killed. Without his family who died, Elie has to go through all this in order to become a man.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2006

    Awesome

    this book was just as good as night if not better. I love his books and i recommend night and day!I'm also in the middle of 'the forgotten' which is a great book so far too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2006

    poetically horrific

    It is a shame that some of the best writing I have ever read draws its inspiration from such a painful well of death and destruction... The writing is brilliant, the message is clear and profound. Like 'Night' I will ponder this book for weeks to come.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2006

    Life-changing experience

    Reading Elie Wiesel's 'Dawn' was a life-changing experience. Wiesel managed to eloquently portray the tragedy of war and the pain for both the killer and the victim. It was beautiful and moving and most defintely the best book I've ever been fortunate enough to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2006

    OK

    I'm not sure if this book matches up to 'Night' at all. I was unable to connect with the characters and the book's topic itself didn't have much meat at all. I think that Elie Wiezel could've done a better job.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2006

    simply beautiful

    This book like all of Wiesels books is simply beautiful, how he places one in the shoes of the characters and makes the reader become part of the book is amazing. This story itself is astonishing. I truly recomend it to all especially Wiesels Fans

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2004

    A Great Book

    This book was very good too. He tells us about all the thing's that he had to suffer before he could stop and live better.It was very informative on the holocaust and it made me realize how good we really have it in these time of days. --- Jaymes Dooley

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2003

    Loved it!

    Best book ever. You have to read this.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2003

    Great book

    this was a great book i learned about Ellie Weisel in english class in school his year and i just hooked on to his books,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2003

    A 'sequel' to Night. Really good book.

    I LOVED this book. It was so good that it only took me five days to read it. It was an extremely shocking story. I couldn't believe what he did at the end of the book. I still wonder why he did that. Some parts were confusing, but altogether, it was a pretty good book. I would DEFINETELY recomend this book to anyone who is interested in WW2.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2003

    a story that truly molded my thoughts

    This book truly portrays to me emotions of ambivilance felt in an 18 year old's conciousness. It makes you stop and think, to be lost in your philosiphies in life and to examine how unjust history has been and wonder how just it is being to global individuals now. It is truly a story that will move and melt even the heart of stone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2003

    Great Book

    i thought this was a good post holocaust book. it demonstrates bravery, courage and love very well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2002

    O.o

    It's an amazing book. The tension, the thoughts, and all those reality Elie Wiesel put into the book. Simply amazing. It will make you think and think about how true it so represents reality. This hundred paged book is only about a few hours of time elapsed, but it captures a full human soul in it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2000

    Dawn was good. It made you think...

    I thought Dawn was a good book. I had to read this book for a summer reading report. Even though I read this book for school, it made me think about different things and views in life. Elie Wiesel had a rough life, and well, this book made me appreciate that my life is going smoothly. I think everyone should read NIGHT before this Dawn. It gives a lot of back ground information...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2000

    Dawn=Good

    This book was a great telling of the tale of Elisha, the main character forced to execute John Dawson, and his comrades. I highly recommend this book to all ages.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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