Day by Day Armageddon: Shattered Hourglass

( 410 )

Overview

In a desperate bid to take back the continental United States—where hordes of undead now dominate the ravaged human population—a Navy commander leads a global mission to the heart of the pandemic. Task Force Hourglass is humanity’s final hope, and his team’s agonizing decisions could mean living one day more—or surrendering to the eternal hell that exists between life and death.

Shattered Hourglass

The ...

See more details below
Audiobook (CD)
$17.99
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$19.99 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (6) from $10.87   
  • New (4) from $10.87   
  • Used (2) from $17.98   
Day by Day Armageddon

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.65
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

In a desperate bid to take back the continental United States—where hordes of undead now dominate the ravaged human population—a Navy commander leads a global mission to the heart of the pandemic. Task Force Hourglass is humanity’s final hope, and his team’s agonizing decisions could mean living one day more—or surrendering to the eternal hell that exists between life and death.

Shattered Hourglass

The terrifying new novel in the acclaimed zombie apocalypse series!

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781455883684
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 12/26/2012
  • Series: Day by Day Armageddon Series , #3
  • Format: CD
  • Sales rank: 1,135,711
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 5.40 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

J.L. BOURNE is on active duty as a commissioned U.S. Naval officer. Born in Arkansas, he resides in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Visit him at www.JLBourne.com before the online servers rust out of postapocalyptic existence.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

1 November

Panama—Task Force Hourglass

Chaos. Pure and complete. The scene below resembled an area following a Category 5 hurricane or aerial bombardment. The many canal structures still remained at the whim of the elements, showing creeping signs of decay and neglect. The jungle was already beginning to reclaim the canal regions, commencing a long bid to erase any evidence that man had split the continents a century before.

Soulless figures walked about, searching, reacting to the firings

of dead synapses.

A corpse wearing only a mechanic’s work shirt shuffled about the area. The mechanic had met its demise via the barrel of a Panamanian soldier’s rifle, back when the national curfew was still being enforced. “He” became “it” shortly after the punctured heart stopped and the body temperature began to fall, letting loose the mystery that reanimated dead people. The anomaly (as it was known) spread quickly throughout the mechanic’s nervous system, altering key areas of sensory anatomy. It anchored and replicated in the brain, but only in the sections where primal instinct developed and was stored via DNA and electrochemical switches from eons of evolution. Along its path of self-replication and infection, the anomaly made a quick stop inside the ear canal. There it microscopically altered the physical make-up of the inner ear ossicles, enhancing the hearing. The eyes were the last stop. After a few hours of reanimation, the anomaly completed replication and replacement of certain cellular structures inside the eye, resulting in rudimentary short-range thermal sensory ability, balancing its death-degraded vision.

The former mechanic stopped and cocked its head sideways. It could hear a noise in the distance, something familiar—a nanosecond flash of audible recognition, then it was gone and forgotten. The sound grew louder, exciting the creature, causing salivation. Translucent gray fluid dribbled from its chin, hitting its bare and nearly skeletal leg. The mechanic took a small step forward in the direction of the noise; the open tendons on top of its foot flexed and pulled the small foot bones as it moved. The creature sensed that the increasing sound was not natural, was not the wind or incessant rain noises it normally ignored. The creature’s pace quickened as it reached a small patch of dense jungle trees. A snake struck out as the mechanic entered the foliage, slapping dead flesh and leaving two small holes in its nearly gone calf muscle. The creature paid no attention and continued to slog forward, nearly clearing the foliage. The chorus of souls-be-damned boomed out from all directions as the thing broke through to the clearing.

Two hundred thousand undead on the mechanic’s side of the Panama Canal bellowed at the sky. A gray military helicopter zoomed over at one hundred knots, trailing the canal southeast.

The mechanic reacted instinctively to the engine noise, reaching up as if it might pluck the great bird from the sky and eat it cold. Frenzied with hunger, it followed the whirlybird, eyes locked onto the flying machine. Ten paces later, the creature stepped over the edge into the canal waters.

The canal’s twisting form was no longer filled with brown muddy water and transiting ships. Bloated, floating bodies now blocked her once-busy shipping route. Some of the disgusting forms still moved, not yet dissolved by the Panama heat and humidity or mosquito larva—infested waters. The countless hordes on one side of the canal roared and moaned at their undead doppelgängers on the other in a Hatfield and McCoy feud spanning the great divide.

Before the anomaly, the world was fixated on the Dow Jones Industrial Average, phony government U3 unemployment numbers, spot gold prices, currency indexes, and the worldwide debt crisis. The very few that now survived prayed to go back to a Dow 1,000 and 80 percent unemployment; at least it would be something.

The conditions on the ground had degraded exponentially since the first case of the anomaly was documented in China. Early in the crisis, the surviving executive branch of the United States government made the decision to nuke the major continental cities in a bid to “deter, deny, or degrade the undead ability to eliminate the surviving population of the United States.” The cities were leveled by high-order nuclear detonation. Many of the creatures were instantly disintegrated in the process but the tradeoff was catastrophic. The dead outside of the comparatively small blast zones were zapped with so many alpha, beta, and gamma particles that the radiation eradicated any bacteria that might enable decomposition, preserving the dead for what scientists estimated at decades.

A few scattered human survivors remained though, and some military command and control was still in place. An operation was at this very moment underway to uncover the chain of events that brought humanity to the brink, maybe beyond.

Behind closed doors there was talk of possibly engineering an effective weapon of mass destruction against the creatures, as there were not enough small-arms ammunition or people to pull the triggers left on the planet. Behind thicker closed doors, there was talk of other, more nefarious things.

The helicopter pilot screamed back to the passengers, cheek full of chewing tobacco, “Three-zero mikes until on top the USS Virginia!”

The helicopter’s internal communications system failed to function as advertised months ago. It was now only good for cockpit communications between the pilot and copilot up front. The pilot was easily in his sixties, as told by his gray hair, deep crow’s feet, and old and battered Air America ball cap. The rider in the copilot’s seat was not part of the air crew—just another member of what was known on the flight docket as Task Force Hourglass.

Pilots had been in short supply over the past few months, most of them lost on reconnaissance missions. The remaining airworthy military aircraft were constructed of thousands of complex moving parts, all of which needed to be rigorously inspected and maintained, or they would soon become very expensive lawn darts. The old pilot seemed to enjoy the company of having someone in the right seat, someone to die alongside if things went too far south, which was frequent.

The rider appeared jumpy and hyperaware of his surroundings. Wearing an overly tight harness, his hand on the door latch and his eyes on the master caution panel, he nervously scanned the helicopter instruments. The rider risked a glance at the ground; they were flying low and fast. An optical illusion from the cockpit put the helicopter nearly level with the canal banks on either side. The creatures screamed and thrashed loudly as they fell into the water, unable to compete with the deafening engine noise. The rider easily but involuntarily filled the gaps with his imagination, hearing the songs of the dead from below. The permanent PTSD gained from the past year’s events pushed forward in his consciousness. He instinctively slapped his side, feeling for his carbine, preparing for another crash.

The pilot took notice and squawked into his headset, “Heard about what happened to you. Chopper went down in the badlands.”

The rider keyed the microphone on his headset. “Something like that.”

The pilot grumbled, “You just transmitted on the radio. Key down to talk to me, and up to talk to the world.”

“Oh, sorry.”

“Don’t worry about it; I doubt anyone heard it anyway. Only those things around. Lots of fellow pilots walking about down there now. These runs keep getting more dangerous by the sortie. The birds are falling apart, no spare parts . . . What did you do before?” the old man yelled into the headset over the whine of the neglected turbine engines.

“I’m a military officer.”

“What branch?”

The rider paused and said, “I’m a navy lieu—uh, a commander.”

The pilot laughed as he said, “Which is it, son? Lieutenant is a ways from commander.”

“Long, boring story.”

“Son, I doubt that. What did you do in the navy before?”

“Aviation.”

“Hell, you wanna fly the rest of the way?”

“No thanks. I’m not exactly the best helicopter stick.”

The pilot chuckled at this. “When I was running small fixed wings low over Laos before you were born, I didn’t know how to fly one of these, either.”

The rider looked down at the undead masses below and mumbled, “I didn’t think we were flying anything over Laos.”

The old man smiled and said, “We weren’t. But how do ya think all them Phoenix Program snipers got close and personal with the NVA brass? By humping their bolt guns a hundred miles through the jungle? Shit . . . if you think Phoenix was only active in Vietnam, I’ve got some oceanfront property in Panama down there to sell ya!”

Both men laughed over the loud thumping rhythm of the spinning rotor blades above their heads. The rider reached into his pack for a piece of gum scavenged from a military MRE, offering the pilot half.

“No thanks, plays hell on my dentures and I’m all out of Fixodent. Who you got back there with you anyway?”

The rider frowned at the old man. “They don’t tell you anything, do they? The Arab-looking guy is a friend of mine. The others are SOCOM, or some of what’s left of them anyway.”

“SOCOM, hmm?”

“Yeah, a few frogs and such. I’m not sure I can tell you much more than that and to be honest, I don’t know much more anyway.”

“I understand, you wanna keep the old man in the dark.”

“No, it’s not that, it’s . . .”

“I’m kidding, no worries. I had to keep a secret or two in my day.”

A few more rotor-thumping minutes passed before the pilot pointed his wrinkled finger forward to the horizon and said, “There’s the Pacific. The coords to the Virginia are on that kneeboard card. Mind punching them into the inertials?”

“Not a problem.”

After the coordinates were entered, the pilot altered course a few degrees starboard and maintained heading.

“What’s your name, son?”

“My friend back there calls me Kilroy, Kil for short. What’s yours?”

“I’m Sam. Pleasure to meet you, even though this may be the first and last time.”

“Well, Sam, you sure know how to keep spirits high.”

Sam reached up, tapped the glass on the upper gauge panel, and said, “You know the risks, Kilroy. There ain’t no tellin’ where you’re goin’ in your little black submarine. Wherever it is, you can bet it will be just as dangerous as right below us. There ain’t no safe zones anywhere.”

© 2012 J. L. Bourne

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 410 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(291)

4 Star

(80)

3 Star

(24)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(10)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 412 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2007

    A reviewer

    Bourne gives us a thinking man's 'or woman's' zombie themed horror novel. This is a struggle for survival that draws the reader in by way of the protagonist's journal. You feel for the characters and honestly care about their survival. The author puts his knowledge of the military to good use here as the protagonist relies on careful planning in a post apocalyptic world. This is an exciting novel that left me hungry for the sequel.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 3, 2011

    Recommend this even if you aren't a zombie fan.....YET!

    great book, but $11.99 for 183 pages is a little much.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2007

    Decent Amateur Effort

    Some of the glowing reviews must have been written by family members. These are useless to both the public and the writer. Granted, the book is an earnest, heartfelt effort in an always-enjoyable subgenre. It's a quick read with some good details and sympathetic characters. But definitely a rough, amateurish, frankly semiliterate work. Actual proofreading, instead of using a spell-check program, would have made it more readable.

    7 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 30, 2011

    Didn't do it for me.

    This book suffered from one inherent flaw--we, as the reader, know that the writer of the diary has survived whatever encounters are described within. No matter how thrilling a reader may perceive the events, there's a diminished sense of danger and urgency whenever everything is in past tense.

    Speaking of the thrills, I found them lacking. The descriptions of the zombies were quite brief and frequently accompanied by the narrator's explanation as to why a particular feature was unsettling. Much like when someone explains why a joke is funny and the humor is lost, the horror falls apart because of the aforementioned explanations of why something should be perceived as scary.

    This book isn't horrible, by any means - the diction is easy to follow and the characters felt fairly real. It felt a little improbable that in a world gone so horribly wrong, the characters in this book had such luck. Thanks to careful planning of the characters, they survived several instances. However, much of their survival can be attributed to finding far more supplies than anticipated.

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    A must for zombie fans!

    First off, I must say that J.L. Bourne did a fantastic job with this book, I was hooked right away! The writing style was new to me, but very effective and captivating. I loved the characters and was very pleased with how well Bourne could capture the human essence allowing you to get to "know" them. I am eagerly awaiting the second installment of Day by Day Armageddon!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    This isn't your typical zombie story. The only leap it asks you to take is that the dead walk. Once you accept this premise, every other detail of this story is firmly planted in cold, hard reality. From the way each character reacts to the situations they find themselves in to the weapons and equipment they use, this is a story meticulously researched and executed. Each character is fully realized with strengths, weaknesses and depth. The story is rich in character development and surprises. This is a story not just for horror fans, but for all fans of good storytelling.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 20, 2011

    Are you kidding me?

    This book was horrible. It reads like really bad internet fan fiction. I expected a lot from this from the reviews here, and it was beyond extremely dissapointing. I am so dissapointed, I want to throw my Nook in a frigging lake. I honestly feel that ripped off. I don't know if the author asked a lot of buddies to post fake reviews on here or something, but this should in no way be as highly rated as it is.

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 19, 2009

    Interesting addition to the zombie fiction genre

    Some of the reviews I've read of Day By Day Armageddon have been unfavorable. I ended up purchasing it primarily because I was hungry for more of the genre and wasn't sure I cared how good it was. It ended up being excellent and a great addition to the zombie fiction genre. Some have complained about spelling and grammar errors, but I chalk this up to the nature of a "journal." However, one must assume that the main character is a well-spoken and educated individual, as the "errors" occur fairly infrequently.

    J.L. Bourne takes us through the early days of the zombie apocalypse with a soldier that starts the journal just a few days before the first outbreaks occur. I felt at multiple points as if I was the one experiencing such, or at least right there with him, and found myself uneasy and pondering my own survival plan. This is one of the best examples I've seen of someone bringing in the personal psychological struggle of it all. (The Walking Dead graphic novel series also did a great job with this.)

    I would definitely recommend this to anyone that loves zombies, or even a good survival book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 25, 2012

    cover to cover in one sitting

    The story starts off rather slow but begins to pick up after the character "bugs-out." If you stick it out through the early portions of the book you will be rewarded. I finished this book on a Sunday night and I bought 'Beyond Exile' on Monday morning. This is a solid read for any fan of the zombie apocalypse genre. READ THIS BOOK!!! You won't be disappointed.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 1, 2012

    IT'S CRAP

    If I could give it no stars, I would. It's so bad I was stunned to find out it wasn't self-published.

    What's wrong with it? Pretty much everything.

    This boring, sexist, illiterate loser of a main character wouldn't make cub scout, much less Navy officer. When I could be bothered to care about him (which aren't we, as readers, supposed to feel SOMETHING for a character?) I couldn't stand him.

    I spent 188 pages waiting for something to happen. And there are more plot holes than there is plot. It's all lists of things he got, and then left behind because a plot-hole happened and he had to move.

    Please, spare yourself and don't come near this thing. It's not even lendable. If you really need to read it, go to a library and check out the paper copy for free. You won't be sorry you didn't waste your hard earned money on it.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Didn't even finish it

    This is one of two books in my life that I stopped reading in the middle. It was just unreadable. There are countless spelling and grammar errors and the book is boring. There is no suspense. It becomes a very matter of fact accounting of events. It is what you would expect from an official report not a personal account written day by day. No emotions are evident and the narrator seems primarily concerned with recounting his own expertise. I am so upset that I wasted book money on this drivel. For the cost I could have had two better books.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2011

    Amazing

    I loved every second of this book and its sequel. Gripping, unique, and scarey.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 3, 2010

    Puts you right there with the flesheaters

    I loved this book, I hope he comes out with a sequel soon. I loved the fact that it was written from a military man's point of view and that there were zombies at every turn. It really made me think about what I would do if faced with this type of stiuation. This book is much more than just a gorefest, it has real, believeable characters in a surreal situation and it makes you think more than you would expect from a zombie novel. if you want a good, scary, seat of your pants read, then check it out and hang on, what a ride.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    DIARY OF DOOM

    The title, Day by Day Armageddon, refers to the fact that the book is presented as a journal written by a survivor of the zombie apocalypse which has sparked the imagination of so many authors lately. The diarist is a Naval pilot, which gives him more skills (like flying) than your average survivor and this makes him interesting. Another fresh twist is that Bourne makes the connection between the fictional apocalypse and the all-too-real post traumatic stress so many of our soldiers, sailors and marines have experienced as a result of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. He astutely compares the ruined cities full of undead with the aftermath of 911 when the streets of New York were full of debris and casualties. And I believe these events; war and terrorism, are two main causes of the recent trend in literature, both for adults and children, toward macabre topics. Vampires, zombies, werewolves, ghosts have all proliferated since 2001, in every section of the book store. There are some flaws in Day by Day. The text is fraught with glaring errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2008

    Waiting for his next book.

    The author has a clear and effective writing style that holds your attention from page to page. He has the rare ability to 'paint a picture' with his choice of words. I read this book in one sitting, too bad it wasn't 1000 pages long.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book hooked me immediately! I could hardly put it down, and am eagerly awaiting the next book from this author!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 14, 2014

    Recommend

    A quick good story. Easy read. "Kills" a few hours!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    One of the bests.

    Amazing story that keeps u excited to keep reading. After finishing this i got the others and read them almost right away. this book is amazing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2013

    Good book!

    If you are into zombie novels, this one is awesome.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 30, 2013

    I can't recommend the Day by Day Armageddon books enough, I like

    I can't recommend the Day by Day Armageddon books enough, I liked all three so much I bought the ebooks (not through BN though) and the audiobooks. I read copiously in the Zombie genre and these are my favorite with Max Brooks coming in second. Enough said.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 412 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)