The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire [NOOK Book]

Overview


On August 9, 378 AD, at Adrianople in the Roman province of Thrace (now western Turkey), the Roman Empire began to fall. Two years earlier, an unforeseen flood of refugees from the East Germanic tribe known as the Goths had arrived at the Empire's eastern border, seeking admittance. Though usually successful in dealing with barbarian groups, in this instance the Roman authorities failed. Gradually coalesced into an army led by Fritigern, the barbarian horde inflicted on Emperor Valens the most disastrous defeat ...
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The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire

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Overview


On August 9, 378 AD, at Adrianople in the Roman province of Thrace (now western Turkey), the Roman Empire began to fall. Two years earlier, an unforeseen flood of refugees from the East Germanic tribe known as the Goths had arrived at the Empire's eastern border, seeking admittance. Though usually successful in dealing with barbarian groups, in this instance the Roman authorities failed. Gradually coalesced into an army led by Fritigern, the barbarian horde inflicted on Emperor Valens the most disastrous defeat suffered by the Roman army since Hannibal's victory at Cannae almost 600 years earlier. The Empire did not actually fall for another century, but some believe this battle signaled nothing less than the end of the ancient world and the start of the Middle Ages.

With impeccable scholarship and narrative flair, renowned historian Alessandro Barbero places the battle in its historical context, chronicling the changes in the Roman Empire, west and east, the cultural dynamics at its borders, and the extraordinary administrative challenge in holding it together. Vividly recreating the events leading to the clash, he brings alive leaders and common soldiers alike, comparing the military tactics and weaponry of the barbarians with those of the disciplined Roman army as the battle unfolded on that epic afternoon. Narrating one of the turning points in world history, The Day of the Barbarians is military history at its very best.
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Editorial Reviews

Steven Coates
One of the many paradoxes in Barbero’s elegant and pleasurable little account — what a joy it is to read about the ancient world in digestible portions — is that the Eastern empire learned from its experience and intentionally shifted its barbarians farther and farther toward the West. Despite being the site of the first irreparable crack in the imperial fabric, the East lived on as the Byzantine Empire and remained stable and strong long after the shell of the West had crumbled under the barbarian onslaught.
— The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

Medievalist Barbero (The Battle: A New History of Waterloo) offers a revisionist history of the relatively obscure battle of Adrianople, arguing that the course of world history changed after the clash in 378, in the eastern Roman province of Thrace, between an army of Goths and a Roman imperial army. The battle resulted in an overwhelming barbarian victory—the eastern emperor Valens died along with two-thirds of his army—setting in motion a train of events that led directly to "the fall of the western Roman Empire," according to Barbero. Rejecting the traditional view that Rome's decline was well underway by the fourth century, Barbero claims that by the eve of the battle of Adrianople, the empire's earlier problems "seemed to be... under control." To reconstitute the imperial army after the devastating losses at Adrianople, the Romans had to turn to the Goths, whose loyalty depended on how well they were paid. Eventually, the barbarians—despite their questionable loyalty—became "indispensable" for the defense and administration of the empire. When their interest and Rome's diverged, the western empire's fate was sealed. While Barbero's thesis is sure to spark debate among scholars and students, his sprightly prose makes this slim volume accessible to a general audience. (Apr.)

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Another colorful recounting of a historic clash of armies, from the author of The Battle: A New History of Waterloo (2005). This time the contest in question is the battle of Adrianople on Aug. 9, 378, when Roman forces took the field against Goth tribes united under their leader Fritigern. Barbero (Medieval Studies/Univ. of Piemonte Orientale) challenges conventional wisdom, arguing that the fourth-century Roman Empire was not "an organism in terminal decay." Matters were fairly stable in a.d. 376, when vast hordes of Goths were set in motion toward Rome's northern border by the arrival from Asia of the ferocious Huns. The Romans, in dire need of workers in the fields and fresh recruits for the army, allowed the barbarians to cross into the empire-and lived to rue the day. Once it became apparent that the food supply was insufficient for all of them, the Goths began a series of raids. With the Roman military already spread thin, Emperor Valens personally led a force to confront Fritigern, only to be defeated by a combination of circumstance, luck and hubris. This defeat, Barbero asserts, presaged the splitting of the eastern and western halves of the Empire and the birth of a new West, in which the Romans were forced to coexist with Germans. Mining the same limited source material as his predecessors, the author has few new insights to offer into the defeat's ramifications for Rome, and he's hardly the first to mark Adrianople as the beginning of the end. Where Barbero does excel, however, is in recreating the day of the battle with evocative details and shrewd commentary on troop deployment and tactics. Fascinating for generals, more mundane for historians.
From the Publisher
Praise for The Day of the Barbarians:

“Barbero’s narrative skillfully exploits the tensions inherent in these events…One of the many paradoxes in Barbero’s elegant and pleasurable little account—what a joy it is to read about the ancient world in digestible portions—is that the Eastern empire learned from its experience and intentionally shifted its barbarians farther and farther toward the West.”—Steve Coates, New York Times Book Review

“While Barbero’s thesis is sure to spark debate among scholars and students, his sprightly prose makes this slim volume accessible to a general audience.”—Publishers Weekly

“Barbero [excels] in recreating the day of the battle with evocative details and shrewd commentary on troop deployment and tactics. Fascinating.”—Kirkus Reviews

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802718976
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 5/26/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 688,410
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.50 (d)
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Alessandro Barbero is a professor of Medieval Studies at the University of Piemonte Orientale in Vercelli, Italy. A previous winner of the Strega Prize, Italy's most distinguished literary award, he is the author of The Battle: A New History of Waterloo, and Charlemagne: Father of a Continent.
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Table of Contents


Prologue     1
The Roman Empire in the Fourth Century     3
The Empire and the Barbarians     9
The Goths and Rome     17
The Emergency of 376     33
The Outbreak of War     51
The Battle by the Willows     59
The War Goes On     71
Valens Moves     83
Adrianople, August 9, 378     93
After the Disaster     113
Theodosius     127
The Antibarbarian Reaction     137
Suggestions for Further Reading     147
Index     173
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2013

    Jordan

    So how has your days been? Mine sucked.

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    Posted June 23, 2013

    Lunar

    Ok its fine

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