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Daylight
     

Daylight

5.0 2
by Duncan Sheik
 
In his first incarnation, Duncan Sheik seemed like little more than a very pretty boy with a very pretty voice -- but then he reinvented himself as the second coming of Nick Drake, scaring away a few ear-candy seekers but winning over a whole new crew of fans. On his fourth album, Daylight, Sheik stakes out yet another plot of ground, one that's slightly closer

Overview

In his first incarnation, Duncan Sheik seemed like little more than a very pretty boy with a very pretty voice -- but then he reinvented himself as the second coming of Nick Drake, scaring away a few ear-candy seekers but winning over a whole new crew of fans. On his fourth album, Daylight, Sheik stakes out yet another plot of ground, one that's slightly closer to the middle of the road but does not lack for patches of beauty. Teaming with Mick Jones -- that'd be the Foreigner guy, not the former Clash co-pilot -- Sheik shapes "On Her Mind" into a classic car-radio power ballad; with the help of longtime Madonna cohort Patrick Leonard, he brings a hip-shaking verve to tunes like "On a High." As the title indicates, the album's mood is overwhelmingly sunny, a sea change that suits Sheik's mellifluous voice well, particularly on slight but sweet confections like "Good Morning" and "Such Reveries." A few listens will help keep summer's light shining bright at any time of the year.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Hal Horowitz
After purging the experimental, Nick Drake-influenced Phantom Moon from his system, on his fourth release it's back to business for singer/songwriter Duncan Sheik. But some remnants of Phantom Moon -- winding song structures, romanticized lyrics, and lush orchestrations -- reappear here, albeit in a more pop format. Producer Patrick Leonard, like Rupert Hine, who worked on his popular debut, frames Sheik's haunting, breathy voice with elaborate arrangements. That makes these ornate songs huskier, but it also interferes with the singer's plaintive style. Borrowing tricks from John Mayer, whose success can partially be attributed to doors Sheik himself opened, the ballad-heavy disc emphasizes the singer's introspective side. Straightforward strum pop tunes like the leadoff track, "Genius," and "On a High" (the first single) neatly frame the passionate, string-laden ballads that dominate the proceedings. Sheik's ability to weave word-heavy tracks into melodies that withstand their weight exhibits his songwriting talent. On the downside, the intricate production and multiple overdubs create a chilly, anonymous backing at odds with his sumptuous voice and meticulous lyrics. But the songs are so consistently strong and the singer so obviously committed, most of the album's shortcomings are insignificant. If the participants hadn't tried so hard, this would be a minor masterpiece. As it is, Daylight is an ambitious and generally successful singer/songwriter effort, especially for those who already have bought into Sheik's lovelorn persona. Its flaws won't dissuade the faithful, but they will prevent the album from being as successful as the artist had intended.
Entertainment Weekly - Scott Schinder
The silky-voiced folk-popster successfully rocks up his sound on his fourth album. (A-)

Product Details

Release Date:
08/27/2002
Label:
Atlantic Mod Afw
UPC:
0075678356926
catalogNumber:
83569
Rank:
225811

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Duncan Sheik   Primary Artist,Synthesizer,Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,Harmonium,Electric Piano,Vocals,Background Vocals
Patrick Leonard   Organ,Synthesizer,Piano,Electric Piano,Moog Bass
Jeff Allen   Bass
Mary Scully   Bass
Gary Leonard   Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Background Vocals,Loops,Ambience
Dougie Yowells   Percussion,Drums
Dave Woodcock   Violin
Patrick Kiernan   Violin
Boguslaw Kostecki   Violin
Julian Leaper   Violin
Mick Stirling   Cello
Gavyn Wright   Conductor
Jay Bellerose   Drums
Bruce White   Viola
Rachel Bolt   Viola
Neal Casal   Background Vocals
Jackie Shave   Violin
David Daniels [cello]   Cello

Technical Credits

Patrick Leonard   Producer,Arranger
Duncan Sheik   Arranger,Producer
Steve Price   Engineer
Ron Shapiro   Executive Producer
Simon Hale   String Arrangements,String Conductor
Lynn Kowalewski   Art Direction
Peter Nashel   Pre-production Assistant
James L. Hunter   Pre-production Assistant

Customer Reviews

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Daylight 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been mild to the past two albums Sheik has created, but "Daylight" impresses again and again. Genius work, and the man has proven his talent supersedes many other performs out there. It is wowing how good this album is.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Damn the radio. The oft-lamented claustrophobic climate of today's music business is frequently used as a trite crutch for loyal listeners of artist ABC or XYZ who will no doubt claim that "in a just world, (insert album by artist ABC or XYZ here) would be a smash hit". The flaw is that the claim is by a loyal listener, hence the message is somewhat diluted. Of COURSE, everyone should be listening to what WE think is great. My very mention of this fact may even dilute my "message" about Duncan Sheik's "Daylight". But before I dig myself an even larger credibility hole, I'll get to the point. This is one terrific rock album. Yes, I said "rock" and yes this is my review of a Duncan Sheik album. More stripped down in production than in his previous efforts, Mr. Sheik has produced one incredibly melodic, tasteful, straightforward guitar record. His lyrics are also effectively more to-the-point: "Come on, let's fall in love" may be simple, but blanketed by the yearning melody of "Half-Life", the sentiment skyrockets. "You're a beautiful girl and I want you to know it" Mr. Sheik sings in the gorgeous acoustic-only "For You". With a line delivered like this, the singer's female problems should be marked "over". His phrasing works, too. Note the the rollicking, I-screwed-up chorus of "Genius": "You don't really need to know every last detail. It's hardly worth telling." We're spared the wordy, woa-is-me that some folkie in a meadow may conjure. Instead, those who think they have a clue are sarcastically labeled "geniuses", the singer included. Again, straight-up...to the point. Why mince words? "Suffice to say I said that I would be there and never came through." he continues in the same song. Mr. Sheik comes shining through on "Daylight" (sorry). In a just world...oh, never mind. You know the rest. I'll spare the details.