DB2 Universal Database in Application Development Environments by Tetsuya Shirai, Robert Harbus, Bill Wilkins, Indran Naick | | 9780130869876 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
DB2 Universal Database in Application Development Environments

DB2 Universal Database in Application Development Environments

by Tetsuya Shirai, Robert Harbus, Bill Wilkins, Indran Naick
     
 

ISBN-10: 0130869872

ISBN-13: 9780130869876

Pub. Date: 07/27/2000

Publisher: Pearson Education

  • A comprehensive guide to developing applications that use DB2 UDB
  • Leveraging Visual Studio in DB2 UDB development: RDO, ADO, OLE DB, and stored procedures
  • Application development for DB2 UDB using MTS and IIS
  • The complete guide to application development with IBM's world-class DB2 Universal Database and Microsoft's Visual Studio

Overview

  • A comprehensive guide to developing applications that use DB2 UDB
  • Leveraging Visual Studio in DB2 UDB development: RDO, ADO, OLE DB, and stored procedures
  • Application development for DB2 UDB using MTS and IIS
  • The complete guide to application development with IBM's world-class DB2 Universal Database and Microsoft's Visual Studio development tools
  • Leverage the power of the ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) programming model
  • Create high-performance distributed and Web-centered database applications

IBM's DB2 Universal Database Version 7.1 is the perfect enterprise database for Windows applications utilizing Microsoft's Distributed interNet Applications (DNA) architecture — and Windows 2000/NT is the fastest growing platform for DB2 development. Now, there's a complete, authoritative guide to enterprise development with DB2 UDB 7.x and Microsoft's Visual Studio 6.0: DB2 Universal Database in Application Development Environments!

In this book, a team of IBM DB2 experts cover every key concept and technology DB2 and Visual Studio developers need to master in order to build robust, high-performance DB2 database applications. Compare DB2's key application programming interfaces, including embedded SQL, DB2 Call Level Interface, ODBC, JDBC, SQLJ, native DB2 UDB APIs, and Microsoft's Data Objects — DAO, RDO, and ADO.

Discover how to incorporate DB2's powerful server-side features into your application designs — including constraints, user-defined distinct types, large objects, user-defined functions, and stored procedures. Next, using both Visual Basic and Visual C++, leverage the power of DB2 with Microsoft's ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) programming model. Coverage includes:

  • DB2 transaction processing using Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS)
  • Using Active Server Pages (ASP) to build Web database applications for Microsoft's Internet Information Server
  • Tuning application performance: refining SELECT statements, managing concurrency, temporary tables, partitioning, and other key techniques
  • Database security considerations

No matter what kind of enterprise database applications you're building, IBM's DB2 UDB and Microsoft's Visual Studio are an outstanding combination — and this book is all you need to leverage them both!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780130869876
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
07/27/2000
Series:
IBM DB2 Series
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
7.03(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.36(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Overview
1(22)
DB2 Universal Database
2(11)
Scalable Database
2(2)
Storing Universal Data
4(1)
DB2 UDB Products
5(1)
DB2 UDB Clients
6(2)
DB2 UDB GUI Tools
8(5)
Microsoft Universal Data Access and DB2 UDB
13(3)
OLE DB
14(1)
ActiveX Data Objects (ADO)
14(1)
Universal Access of DB2 UDB
15(1)
Microsoft Visual Studio
16(4)
Add-In Tools
17(3)
Using Microsoft Technology
20(3)
Set Up Application Development Environment
23(34)
Installing the DB2 UDB Product
24(13)
Installing on Windows NT
24(13)
Creating the Sample Database
37(4)
Using First Steps
37(4)
Microsoft Programming Tools
41(1)
Microsoft Data Access Components
41(2)
Setting Up Connections
43(9)
Automated Configuration Using Discovery
43(1)
DB2 Discovery
44(2)
Configuring DB2 Clients
46(6)
Modeling Your Production Database
52(2)
Summary
54(3)
Introducing Programming Interfaces
57(60)
DB2 UDB Application Overview
58(1)
Embedded SQL
59(10)
Static SQL
60(5)
Dynamic SQL
65(4)
Call Level Interface and ODBC
69(4)
A DB2 UDB CLI Application
70(3)
Java Interfaces (JDBC and SQLJ)
73(11)
JDBC Application
74(1)
A Sample JDBC Application
75(2)
To Build the Application
77(1)
Running the Application
78(1)
SQLJ Applications
78(3)
Compiling and Running SQLJ Programs
81(3)
Native DB2 UDB APIs
84(1)
Microsoft Data Objects (DAO, RDO, ADO)
85(32)
Development of Visual Basic Data Access Methods
85(3)
Structure of Visual Basic Data Access Methods
88(1)
Data Access Objects
89(8)
Remote Data Objects
97(11)
ActiveX Data Objects
108(8)
DAO, RDO, ADO Summary
116(1)
DB2 Server-Side Features
117(76)
Constraints
118(7)
Unique Constraints
119(1)
Referential Constraint
120(4)
Table-Check Constraints
124(1)
User-defined Distinct Types (UDTs)
125(2)
Large Objects (LOBs)
127(10)
Character Large Objects (CLOB)
127(1)
Double-byte Character Large Objects (DBCLOB)
128(1)
Binary Large Object (BLOB)
129(1)
Manipulating Large Objects
130(7)
User-Defined Functions (UDFs)
137(19)
Defining UDFs
138(1)
Source Functions
139(1)
SQL Functions
140(2)
External Scalar Functions
142(6)
External Table Functions
148(4)
OLE DB External Table Functions
152(2)
Performance Tips for UDFs
154(2)
Triggers
156(4)
Stored Procedures
160(33)
Building Stored Procedures
161(17)
SQL Procedures
178(6)
Nested Stored Procedures
184(2)
Keep Stored Procedure Processes
186(1)
Stored Procedure Builder
187(6)
Building Applications Using Visual Basic
193(94)
Data Entry Forms
194(26)
ODBC Data Source for Accessing Sample Database
194(2)
Opening the Visual Basic Project
196(1)
Setting Project References
197(2)
Creating Forms Using the Data Form Wizard
199(19)
Visual Data Manager Add-In
218(2)
OpenSchema Recordsets
220(16)
BookSale Schema
221(15)
Run Booksales Sample Application on DB2 UDB
236(1)
DB2 UDB Sample Application
236(30)
Common Procedures in Main Display Forms
237(4)
RecSet Module
241(4)
Logon Form
245(1)
Menu Form
246(3)
Table Access Form
249(3)
Department Information
252(4)
Employee Information
256(4)
Employee Photo
260(1)
Employee Resume
261(2)
Employee Activities
263(2)
Projects by Employee
265(1)
Calling DB2 UDB Stored Procedures
266(11)
Calling a Stored Procedure Returning a Recordset
272(5)
Using Commitment Control
277(10)
Building Applications Using Visual C++
287(30)
Visual C++ Applications with ADO
288(16)
GetRows Sample
288(4)
VarCHAR Sample
292(12)
Building Applications Using DB2 UDB Add-Ins
304(13)
Activating DB2 UDB Add-Ins
305(2)
Developing Stored Procedures Using Add-Ins
307(10)
Using Microsoft Transaction Server
317(36)
Benefits of Microsoft Transaction Server
318(1)
Transaction Processing Concepts
319(2)
MTS Architecture
321(2)
MTS and the Supporting Environment
321(2)
MTS Concepts and Processes
323(2)
Activities
323(1)
Contexts
324(1)
Server Process
324(1)
Automatic Transactions
325(1)
Just-In-Time Activation
325(1)
Creating MTS Components
325(6)
Requirements for MTS Components
325(1)
Adding Transactional Support
326(2)
Handling Errors
328(2)
Creating Efficient Objects
330(1)
Using MTS Explorer
331(6)
Creating Packages
332(1)
Setting Package Properties
333(2)
Adding Components to a Package
335(1)
Component Locations and Versioning
336(1)
Setting Component Properties
337(1)
Security Considerations
337(6)
Declarative Security: Roles and Identities
338(1)
Setting Package Security
339(1)
Creating and Assigning Security Roles
339(2)
Setting package identity
341(2)
Getting DB2 UDB and MTS to Work Together
343(4)
Software Prerequisites
343(1)
Installation and Configuration
344(3)
Sample Program --- Using ADO with an MTS Component
347(6)
Steps to Run the Sample Application
347(1)
How MTS Handles DCOM
348(1)
More About Client and Server Projects
348(5)
Application Development on IIS
353(52)
Creating ASP Applications
354(1)
Starting-Point Directory
354(1)
Global Data
354(1)
Creating Server Script
355(3)
Coding Active Server Pages
355(1)
ASP Processing Directives
356(1)
Handling Run Time Errors
357(1)
ASP Built-In Objects
358(7)
The Request Object
359(3)
The Response Object
362(1)
The Application Object
363(1)
The Session Object
364(1)
Using ActiveX Data Objects
365(6)
Connecting to the Database
366(1)
Creating a Recordset Object
367(4)
Security Considerations in ASP
371(4)
Web Application Security
371(1)
Setting IIS Permissions
372(2)
Allowing Anonymous Logon
374(1)
Sample Web Application Using ASP
375(30)
General Procedure for Installing Web Applications
375(11)
Creating a Web Application: Microsoft Visual Interdev 6.0
386(19)
Tuning Application Performance
405(54)
Using SELECT Statements
406(6)
Specify Only Needed Columns in the Select List
407(1)
Limit the Number of Rows by Using Predicates
407(3)
Specify the Optimize For n Rows Clause
410(1)
Specify the Fetch First n Rows Only Clause
410(1)
Specify the For Fetch Only Clause
411(1)
Avoid Data Type Conversions
411(1)
Concurrency
412(7)
Isolation Levels
413(5)
Lock Table Statement
418(1)
Locksize Parameter of Alter Table Statement
418(1)
Declared Temporary Table
419(5)
Defining a Declared Temporary Table
420(1)
Create Table with Not Logged Initially Option
421(3)
Convert ODBC into Static SQL
424(4)
Considerations in a Partitioned Environment
428(5)
Specify For Fetch Only
429(1)
OLTP Applications in a Partitioned Environment
429(4)
CLI/ODBC Trace Facility
433(26)
Getting Started
434(1)
CLI Trace File Contents
435(5)
Analysis Objectives
440(1)
Analyzing the Trace and Finding the Problem
441(8)
Fixing the Performance Problem
449(10)
Appendix A-Supported Statements for SQL Procedures 459(6)
Appendix B-Example DB2 UDB Source Code 465(16)
Appendix C-Related Publications 481

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