DC: The New Frontier, Volume 2

Overview

It's a mystery in space as Superman, the Suicide Squad, and the Challengers of the Unknown encounter a frightening extraterrestrial lifeform. Could this hideous creature have anything to do with the sense of impending doom all the heroes are experiencing? Plus, Hal Jordan is grounded, while postwar America faces a monstrous threat older than Vandal Savage! Will this challenge bring America and its heroes back together or tear them apart?
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DC: The New Frontier Vol. 2

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Overview

It's a mystery in space as Superman, the Suicide Squad, and the Challengers of the Unknown encounter a frightening extraterrestrial lifeform. Could this hideous creature have anything to do with the sense of impending doom all the heroes are experiencing? Plus, Hal Jordan is grounded, while postwar America faces a monstrous threat older than Vandal Savage! Will this challenge bring America and its heroes back together or tear them apart?
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The versions of the classic DC Comics heroes that baby boomers grew up reading were developed during comics' "Silver Age," from 1956 through the 1960s; after that time, superhero comics aimed at older, more jaded readers turned "grim and gritty." Writer/artist Cooke attempts to recapture the Silver Age's heroic and optimistic ideals within the more sophisticated vision of contemporary comics. His strategy is to portray DC's 1950s heroes in the context of postwar American culture. Hence, Cooke links the virtual disappearance of superheroes early in that decade to McCarthy-era witch-hunts and connects the Klan's murder of an African-American superhero to detective John Jones's fears of being exposed as an illegal alien-from Mars. Later, he successfully parallels the formation of the Justice League with President Kennedy's "New Frontier," both embodying a new idealism to cope with a dangerous world. The simple, handsome, expressive figures recall not only the work of animator Bruce Timm, but also art by such comics masters as Jack Kirby and Alex Toth. Implying in his afterword that "New Frontier" is an allegory of post-9/11 America, Cooke has stirringly laid out a promising new path for the superhero genre. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401204617
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Publication date: 5/1/2005
  • Series: DC: The New Frontier Series , #2
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 698,335
  • Product dimensions: 6.63 (w) x 10.18 (h) x 0.34 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A beautiful but muddled ending!

    Darwyn Cooke has such a way of transporting readers to the time period he is drawing. Its pretty amazing. Here, every page is almost perfectly crafted to the 50's. My problem with this portion of the overall storyline is that at times the "Center", which is the antagonist, is too vague. The danger is real enough but I'm not sure why. Also, and this might be the fault of the letterer, but the narration boxes all looked the same so it was, at times, difficult to figure out which hero was speaking. Overall, the book is gorgeous but the plot drug on too long.

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    Posted November 13, 2008

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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