DDC Learning to Create a Web Page with Microsoft Office XP by Chris Katsaropoulos, Ann H. Cornelisen, Catherine Skintik |, Other Format | Barnes & Noble
DDC Learning to Create a Web Page with Microsoft Office XP

DDC Learning to Create a Web Page with Microsoft Office XP

by Chris Katsaropoulos, Ann H. Cornelisen, Catherine Skintik
     
 

This total-immersion manual shows readers at a variety of skill levels how to use basic skills in applications such as Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access to create and publish lively and attractive Web pages. It provides a hands-on tutorial that walks them step by step, mouse-click by mouse-click, keystroke by keystroke through each stage of the Web page

Overview

This total-immersion manual shows readers at a variety of skill levels how to use basic skills in applications such as Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access to create and publish lively and attractive Web pages. It provides a hands-on tutorial that walks them step by step, mouse-click by mouse-click, keystroke by keystroke through each stage of the Web page development process. The well-illustrated, spiral-bound manual contains easy-to-read, appealingly formatted procedural explanations and step-by-step exercises in a Notes/Exercise format. An accompanying CD-ROM contains data files and a Web page album with 50 sample quality Web pages. Create a Web Page with Word 2002. Create a Web Page with PowerPoint 2002. Create a Web Page with Excel 2002. Create a Web Page with Access 2002. For anyone who want to develop skill in using various Microsoft Office applications (Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access) to create Web pages.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585772292
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Series:
DDC Learning Series
Edition description:
BK&CD-ROM
Pages:
227
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 10.94(h) x 0.78(d)

Read an Excerpt

This Book is Designed for You . . .

If you have a basic proficiency in Microsoft Office XP or are just beginning to learn Office and would like to begin creating Web pages.

Until now, publishing Web pages has been a fairly technical undertaking, which typically could only be handled by HTML gurus, Webmasters, or system administrators. The Web publishing features of Office XP change all that. This book shows you how to use basic skills in applications such as Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access to create and publish lively and attractive Web pages.

You will learn how to:

  • Save any type of Office XP document as a Web page ready to post on the World Wide Web.
  • Add hyperlinks to any type of Office XP document.
  • Create professional-quality Web pages using Office XP templates and wizards.
  • Jazz up Web pages with backgrounds, borders, and graphics.
  • Add animation and multimedia effects such as scrolling text, video clips, and sound clips to your Web pages.

This book assumes that you have some general knowledge and experience with computers, and that you already know how to perform the following tasks:

  • Use a mouse (double-click, etc.).
  • Make your way around Microsoft applications (copy, paste, print, etc.).
  • Install and run programs.
About Microsoft® Office XP Professional

Microsoft® Office XP Professional includes Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint®, Outlook, and several other programs, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer. Each of the applications and utilities included in the package can be used separately or the applications can be usedtogether to produce professional-looking documents.

  • If you are using the standard Microsoft Office XP suite package, Access and some bonus applications will not be included. Bonus applications are not covered in this book.

The following software applications will be covered in Learning to Create a Web Page with Office XP:

  • Word 2002, a word processing program, used for creating and editing documents.
  • PowerPoint 2002, a presentation graphics program, used for creating visual presentations.
  • Excel 2002, a spreadsheet program, used for analyses and graphing of numerical data.
  • Access 2002, a database program, used for organizing and sorting information.

The information created in one application can be shared with other applications. For instance, a worksheet created in Excel, or a database created in Access, can easily be incorporated into a document that is created in Word. Data created in Word, Excel, or Access can be incorporated into PowerPoint. What Do I Need to Use This Book. . .

This book assumes that you have Microsoft Office XP Professional installed on your computer system and access to browser applications such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator. (If you do not currently have one of these applications, contact your Internet Service Provider for instructions on how to download them.)

  • Because Office XP is a Microsoft application, some Web page features and effects created using Office work better when viewed in the Internet Explorer browser. Explorer is the recommended browser for completing the exercises in this book, though other browsers will work for completing and viewing all but a few of the exercise steps.

Though you do not have to be connected to the Internet to use this book, an Internet connection is recommended, either through your school, your office, or an online service such as America Online or MSN. This book does not cover how to connect to the Internet.

Please read over the following list of "must haves" to ensure that you are ready to be connected to the Internet.

  • A computer (with a recommended minimum of 16 MB of RAM) and a modem port.
  • A modem (with a recommended minimum speed of 14.4kbps, and suggested speed of 28.8kbps) that is connected to an analog phone line (assuming you are not using a direct Internet connection through a school, corporation, etc.).
  • Established access to the Internet through an online service, independent Internet service provider, etc.
  • A great deal of patience. The Internet is a fun and exciting place. But getting connected can be frustrating at times. Expect to run into occasional glitches, to get disconnected from time to time, and to experience occasional difficulty in viewing certain Web pages or features. The more up-to-date your equipment and software are, however, the less difficulty you will probably experience.
How to Use This Book Lesson Introduction

Before you start Exercise 1, read the brief Lesson 1 introduction. It will give you some basic concepts and terminology that will make understanding Web pages easier. Lessons 1–4

The exercises in each lesson contain two parts:

Notes: Explain and illustrate Office and Web page concepts and tools being introduced.

The right column on each page frequently contains hints, notes, cautions, and definitions.

  • Cautions and warnings that alert you to potential pitfalls
  • Hints and additional notes on an Office XP feature and on how to make creating Web pages easier and more interesting
  • Definitions of Office and Web page terminology

Exercise Directions: Explain and illustrate how to complete the exercise. Exercises will make use of data files.

  • Mouse actions are only provided when a new concept is being introduced. Therefore, if you forget the keystroke or mouse action required to perform a task, you can use either the Help feature (press F1 key) or the index of this book to find the procedure.
Special Challenge Exercise

Following the last lesson, an additional exercise is provided that gives you a chance to create your own Web site using many of the features presented in the Web page exercises. Appendices

Publish Your Web Pages: An overview of the process used to load Web pages on a server for access via the World Wide Web.

Troubleshooting: Help for common pitfalls you may encounter.

Modifying Office XP Web Pages in FrontPage: Additional modifications you can make to Office XP Web pages in Microsoft FrontPage.

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