DDT and the American Century: Global Health, Environmental Politics, and the Pesticide That Changed the World

DDT and the American Century: Global Health, Environmental Politics, and the Pesticide That Changed the World

by David Kinkela
     
 

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Praised for its ability to kill insects effectively and cheaply and reviled as an ecological hazard, DDT continues to engender passion across the political spectrum as one of the world's most controversial chemical pesticides. Kinkela chronicles the use of DDT around the world from 1941 to the present with a particular focus on the United States, which has played a

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Overview

Praised for its ability to kill insects effectively and cheaply and reviled as an ecological hazard, DDT continues to engender passion across the political spectrum as one of the world's most controversial chemical pesticides. Kinkela chronicles the use of DDT around the world from 1941 to the present with a particular focus on the United States, which has played a critical role in encouraging the global use of the pesticide.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
This is a valuable book about a controversy that is still of critical importance. Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals; general readers.—Choice

Kinkela untangles several DDT-related themes. . . . [and] examines each thread in a way that reveals an overarching tension between the ideals underlying Henry Luce's notion of the 'American century' and the limits of technology.—Technology and Culture

[Kinkela] has proved his fluency in intellectual, social, cultural, and policy history.—Environmental History

Library Journal
Kinkela (history, SUNY at Fredonia) traces the global use of DDT since 1941, particularly in relation to malaria, and examines the pesticide's political and economic implications in this nuanced and accessible study of complicated issues of health and the environment. Rachel Carson is part of this story, including her early advocacy of what is now called integrated pest management. Problems with pesticide poisoning of agriculture workers and insect resistance to DDT preceded the 1972 ban on the use of DDT in the United States. Historic cartoons and photographs included here add insight to this highly politicized and contentious subject. VERDICT Readers interested in the environment, public health, and international relations will find this book particularly timely as the World Health Organization and the Gates Foundation renew efforts for malaria eradication more than 40 years after abandoning eradication as a goal in 1969. Kinkela's recognition that current tools and systems are insufficient for the task and his advocacy of a more integrated effort than past attempts make this book a relevant and useful addition.—Mary Chitty, Cambridge Healthtech Lib., Needham, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807869307
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
11/07/2011
Series:
Luther H. Hodges Jr. and Luther H. Hodges Sr. Series on Business, Entrepreneurship, and Public Policy
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
272
File size:
3 MB

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
If anyone can rescue the continuing debate over DDT from the ranters and ideologues, David Kinkela can. His book is a model of historical research—even-handed and carefully reasoned, based on a wealth of evidence.—Donald Worster, author of A Passion for Nature: The Life of John Muir

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