De-Marketing

Overview

We all understand the basic principles underpinning marketing activity: to identify unfulfilled needs and desires and boost demand for the solutions a product is offering. The mantra is always "sell more". De-marketing tries for the very opposite. Why would a company actively try to decrease demand?

There are many good reasons to do so: a firm cannot supply large enough quantities, or wants to limit supply to a region of narrow profit margin. Or, crucially, to discourage ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$121.08
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$135.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $120.55   
  • New (4) from $120.55   
  • Used (2) from $121.07   
De-Marketing

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$53.95
BN.com price

Overview

We all understand the basic principles underpinning marketing activity: to identify unfulfilled needs and desires and boost demand for the solutions a product is offering. The mantra is always "sell more". De-marketing tries for the very opposite. Why would a company actively try to decrease demand?

There are many good reasons to do so: a firm cannot supply large enough quantities, or wants to limit supply to a region of narrow profit margin. Or, crucially, to discourage undesirable customers: those that could be bad for brand reputation, or in the case of the finance sector, high risk. De-marketing can yield effective solutions to these issues, effectively curtailing demand yet (crucially) not destroying it. Nevertheless, the fundamental negativity of de-marketing strategies often causes organisations to hide them from view and, as a result, they are rarely studied.

This then is the first book to cast light on the secretive, counterintuitive world of de-marketing, deconstructing its mysteries and demonstrating how to incorporate them into a profit-driven marketing plan. A selection of thought leaders in strategic marketing mix theory with illustrative global cases, providing insight into how these strategies have been employed in practice and measuring their successes and failures. It’s a must-read for any student or researcher that wants to think differently about marketing.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Editors Bradley and Blythe (UK academicians) do an excellent job identifying situations that call for a "demarketing" strategy. Using well-chosen case studies, the authors show how demarketing can play an important role in a company’s quest for a "profit-driven" marketing plan. The final chapter provides compelling discussion of the murky boundaries that separate general demarketing and selective demarketing (e.g., a multi-product company reducing demand across its entire portfolio versus reducing demand for a single item). Though the concept of demarketing had its roots in the 1970s (in what Philip Kotler and Sidney Levy termed "overfull demand"), it has received very little attention since then. This volume does much to help better understand demarketing, its limitations, and its potential. This in itself is a genuine contribution to the literature. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Students at all levels; researchers; practitioners; general readers." - N A. Govoni, Babson College in CHOICE May 2014
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415816472
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 12/9/2013
  • Pages: 240

Meet the Author

Nigel Bradley was Senior Lecturer in Marketing at the University of Westminster, UK

Jim Blythe is Professor of Marketing at Westminster University and Visiting Professor at Plymouth Business School, UK

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. De-Marketing: An overview of the antecedents and current status of the discipline (Nigel Bradley and Jim Blythe) 2. Synchromarketing (Maria Pilar Martinez-Ruiz) 3. Synchromarketing: Demarketing Places (Gary Warnaby and Dominic Medway) 4. Demarketing in a Wicked Problem Context – The Case of Cocaine (Nigel Jones, Paul Baines, and Steve Welsh) 5. Counter-Marketing Case Studies (Clive Boddy) 6. General Demarketing (Heather Skinner) 7. General Demarketing Case Study: TRAT (Nadio Granata and David Wyles) 8. Selective Demarketing: A Value Destructive Approach (Jillian Farquhar) 9. Selective Demarketing: Frizzell Insurance (Daisy Tan) 10. Ostensible Demarketing: the Power of Prohibition (Robin Croft) 11. Case Study: Ostensible Demarketing: British Airways Tells Britons "Don’t Fly" (Sally McKechnie) 12. Unintentional Demarketing (Terri Kirchner) 13. Unintentional Demarketing in Higher Education (Nnamdie Madichie) 14. Demarketing and Marketing: A Conceptual Discussion (Jim Blythe)

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)