De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon
  • De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon
  • De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon

De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon

5.0 2
by William Farina, Felicia Hardison Londre
     
 

ISBN-10: 0786423838

ISBN-13: 9780786423835

Pub. Date: 12/20/2005

Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers

The question may be met with chagrin by traditionalists, but the identity of the Bard is not definitely decided. During the 20th century, Edward de Vere, the most flamboyant of the courtier poets, a man of the theater and literary patron, became the leading candidate for an alternative Shakespeare.

This text presents the controversial argument for de Vere's

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Overview

The question may be met with chagrin by traditionalists, but the identity of the Bard is not definitely decided. During the 20th century, Edward de Vere, the most flamboyant of the courtier poets, a man of the theater and literary patron, became the leading candidate for an alternative Shakespeare.

This text presents the controversial argument for de Vere's authorship of the plays and poems attributed to Shakespeare, offering the available historical evidence and moreover the literary evidence to be found within the works. Divided into sections on the comedies and romances, the histories and the tragedies and poems, this fresh study closely analyzes each of the 39 plays and the sonnets in light of the Oxfordian authorship theory. The vagaries surrounding Shakespeare, including the lack of information about him during his lifetime, especially relating to the "lost years" of 1585-1592, are also analyzed, to further the question of Shakespeare's true identity and the theory of de Vere as the real Bard.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786423835
Publisher:
McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
Publication date:
12/20/2005
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

Pt. 1Comedies and romances
1The Tempest19
2The two gentlemen of Verona25
3The merry wives of Windsor30
4Measure for measure34
5The comedy of errors40
6Much ado about nothing44
7Love's labor's lost49
8A midsummer night's dream54
9The merchant of Venice60
10As you like it66
11The taming of the shrew72
12All's well that ends well77
13Twelfth night82
14The winter's tale88
15Cymbeline93
16Pericles98
Pt. 2Histories
17King John105
18Richard II110
19Henry IV, Part I115
20Henry IV, Part II120
21Henry V125
22Henry VI, Part I131
23Henry VI, Part II135
24Henry VI, Part III140
25Richard III145
26Henry VIII151
Pt. 3tragedies and poems
27Troilus and Cressida159
28Coriolanus164
29Titus Andronicus168
30Romeo and Juliet173
31Timon of Athens179
32Julius Caesar184
33Macbeth189
34Hamlet195
35King Lear201
36Othello207
37Antony and Cleopatra213
38Venus and Adonis219
39The rape of Lucrece223
40The sonnets227

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De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is another important book that adds more information to the polemical Shakespeare Authorship debate. Many people, including scholars may not realize that the identity of the 'Bard' has been questioned for over two centuries. The debate has reached the dimension that now both the Shakespeare Folger Library in Washington D.C. (the leading Shakespeare research center in the world) and the London Globe Theater, are neutral on who the author was! Farina's book provides a fresh perspective on sources for the Shakespeare Canon. For all purposes it is an Oxfordian version of 'Asimov's Guide to Shakespeare'. It analyzes the sources of each work and provides material that question the likelihood that Shakespeare could have been the author, and posits the more likely possibility that the current leading candidate for authorship, Edward de Vere, the seventeenth Earl of Oxford, is the real author. It also serves as a reference book for researchers from both sides, and raises issues that any responsible scholar needs to address. It is a book that is long overdue. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago