Dead Boys

Overview

Ignatz Zwakh lives in a strange world. Dead Girls, the genetically recombined doll-girls designed by Dr. Tocixophilous, have now mated with humans to form a new subspecies. Meta, the parasitic cyborgs who resulted, have carried the new genus into space. Mars has been colonized and in its most decadent city, Paris, marauding Elohim strive to execute the traitorous Dead Girls. Bangkok swelters from its sex bars to its alleyways with the strange sexuality the future has brought. The future has begun to invade the ...
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1996-03-01 Hardcover New Excellent Book, Great Read, Great Information, Fast and friendly Customer Service.

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1996 Hard cover Us ed. New in new dust jacket. Book Appears Unread Sewn binding. Paper over boards. Audience: General/trade.

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Overview

Ignatz Zwakh lives in a strange world. Dead Girls, the genetically recombined doll-girls designed by Dr. Tocixophilous, have now mated with humans to form a new subspecies. Meta, the parasitic cyborgs who resulted, have carried the new genus into space. Mars has been colonized and in its most decadent city, Paris, marauding Elohim strive to execute the traitorous Dead Girls. Bangkok swelters from its sex bars to its alleyways with the strange sexuality the future has brought. The future has begun to invade the past and reality shifts and shimmers as the Meta wage their war. Ignatz Zwakh is a very strange man in a very strange world.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Time and space collapse-and nearly pull narrative coherence into the void with them-in this audacious but sometimes impenetrable sequel to the praised Dead Girls (1995). The world of the 21st century is still governed by a "pornocracy" that ritually desexes "dead girls," or women turned into vampiric "dolls" by a nanotech virus. There, Ignatz Zwakh, hero of the continuing saga, mourns his executed dead girl Primavera by pickling her extracted reproductive organs in a whiskey bottle. His perverse fascination has a purpose: from her future life on the planet Mars, Vanity, the daughter Ignatz will program from Primavera's residual wetware, is "using her mother's ablated uterus as a transdimensional mailbox" to guide her genesis. As the author cross-cuts from Ignatz's decadent adventures in Thailand to Vanity's efforts to elude a dead boy bounty hunter, identities blur and timescapes blend into one another. At the heart of the novel lies a critique of Western capitalism and sexual politics, of how they dehumanize and homogenize all they touch. But it is often difficult to see this point for the prose. Calder's penchant for allusive wordplay redolent with references to B-movies and other SF stories produces scintillating dialogue, but it deteriorates into obfuscatory self-indulgence when characters are left alone to ruminate on their fates, or on the universe's entropic decline. (Mar.)
Carl Hays
Calder's "Dead Girls" (1994) won raves for its surrealistic vision of a twenty-first-century society threatened by "lilim" adolescent females transformed by a nanotechnological virus into robotic sexual predators. Still mourning the destruction of his own cherished "dead girl," Ignatz Zwakh, the former novel's narrator, returns to discover that the virus has begun infecting males, including, as the first victim, himself. Under the influence of the quantum-based programming driving the virus, Ignatz begins seeing his future on a terraformed Mars, where the "lilim" have run rampant and are ritually executed. Soon it becomes clear that the plague's reach extends not only into the future but into the very structure of time itself. Calder's often morbid, metaphor-chocked prose may be sf's imaginative leading edge or merely an eccentric detour; it probably will turn away more than a few tradition-bound readers. Yet Calder's exceptional talent is hard to ignore, and the buzz about him in sf circles should put this and his future work in heavy demand.
Kirkus Reviews
Sequel to last year's Dead Girls, Calder's cyberpunksplatterpunkish near-future novel about robot vampire females, or Lilim. Iggy Zwalch, a carrier of the virus that transforms girls into Lilim, is addicted to Lilim-sex; and though his lover, Primavera, is dead, he's hacked out her reproductive organs and keeps them preserved in a jar. When in need of sex, he takes the organs out and chews on them to get a jolt of Lilim- pheromones. Iggy hangs out in a Bangkok bar, hectoring his fellow- drinkers, reflecting upon his bizarre sexual appetites, and wondering whether he's actually turning into something else: one of the sexless, fanged angels known as Elohim. Meanwhile, in the future, Dagon, the Elohim into whom Iggy may be turning, rapes/interrogates/tortures to death a Lilim called Vanity, who may or may not be Iggy's daughter. Vanity somehow communicates her experiences to Iggy, the explanation being that the future is invading and corrupting the past.

A thoroughly unpleasant piece of business—exhibitionistic, disgusting, misogynistic, and pointless: Standard splatterpunk (K.W. Jeter, for instance, or S.P. Somtow) looks quite jolly by comparison.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312139575
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 2/5/1996
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.77 (w) x 8.52 (h) x 0.80 (d)

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