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Dead Hungry
     

Dead Hungry

3.0 1
by Louis Arata
 

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Flesh: It's What's For Dinner. Ghouls are overrunning Chicago. With an appetite for the dead, it doesn't matter if it's road-kill, bodies from the morgue, or the recently buried. For graduate student Tucker Smith, life is now scarier than the horror novels he studies. His girlfriend is feeling peckish for raw meat. His roommate dabbles in the Ghoul Culture. And his

Overview

Flesh: It's What's For Dinner. Ghouls are overrunning Chicago. With an appetite for the dead, it doesn't matter if it's road-kill, bodies from the morgue, or the recently buried. For graduate student Tucker Smith, life is now scarier than the horror novels he studies. His girlfriend is feeling peckish for raw meat. His roommate dabbles in the Ghoul Culture. And his grunge rocker brother becomes involved in the black market supply of bodies. Tucker soon discovers that low-budget horror movies, reality TV shows, national food competitions, and cultural sensitivity collide with family secrets.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940045343640
Publisher:
Louis Arata
Publication date:
10/13/2013
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
534 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Louis Arata is a longtime resident of Chicago, where he has worked a variety of jobs, including debriefing gang members, building databases, and reconciling million dollar budgets. For fun, he is involved in theatre. His play, A Careful Wish, was first performed in 2008.

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Dead Hungry 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ClydeWolfe More than 1 year ago
Dead Hungry is an interesting and entertaining read, to be sure. Ghouls do not get enough attention when compared to zombies and vampires, and it was a fine change of pace to see them getting proper treatment. Mr. Arata keeps the story engaging and the characters compelling throughout the novel. Could the book have been shortened by about a hundred pages? I believe so. There's so much going on that it comes across as TOO much going on at times. Overall, the arc holds up, even with a few stretches where suspending disbelief might be a bit of a challenge (ie. the feeling that there is lack of societal imperative to deal with things when there should be some major kind of response). My only other criticism lies with the ending. Without spoiling things, the final scene doesn't feel like a true ending, as if the it's just another scene. I'd definitely recommend this book to others.