The Dead Man's Brother [NOOK Book]

Overview

Former art smuggler, now respected art dealer, Ovid Wiley awakes to find his former partner stabbed to death on his gallery floor. When a CIA agent shows up to spring him from NYPD custody, things get really strange.

The CIA offers to clear up the murder charge in exchange for a favor: They want Ovid to go to Vatican City and trace the trail of a renegade priest who has gone missing with millions in church ...
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The Dead Man's Brother

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Overview

Former art smuggler, now respected art dealer, Ovid Wiley awakes to find his former partner stabbed to death on his gallery floor. When a CIA agent shows up to spring him from NYPD custody, things get really strange.

The CIA offers to clear up the murder charge in exchange for a favor: They want Ovid to go to Vatican City and trace the trail of a renegade priest who has gone missing with millions in church funds. What’s the connection? The priest’s lover, a woman Ovid knew in his smuggling days…
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015055504
  • Publisher: Black Curtain Digital
  • Publication date: 8/29/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 226,856
  • File size: 557 KB

Meet the Author

Roger Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction, best known for his Chronicles of Amber series. He won the Nebula award three times (out of 14 nominations) and the Hugo award six times (also out of 14 nominations), including two Hugos for novels: the serialized novel ...And Call Me Conrad (subsequently published under the title This Immortal) and then the novel Lord of Light (1967).
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An exhilarating thriller

    Ovid Wiley was once an infamous art thief, but gave up the second story profession to become a highly regarded New York City art dealer. One morning he arrives at his gallery only to be met by his former criminal partner, Carl Bernini; who is a corpse on the floor. <BR/><BR/>NYPD charges Ovid with the homicide. The CIA offers Ovid a deal; they will spring him from jail and insure the charges are dropped in return for him working a mission for them. Ovid agrees and heads to Rome, Italy to follow the trail of money-laundering priest Father Bretagne, who recently vanished without a trace. Ovid wonders about the coincidences as his friend Maria Borsini was apparently lover to both Bernini and Bretagne. The clues send him next to Brazil where probable death awaits him from lethal foes.<BR/><BR/>Apparently the late great sci fi writer Roger Zelazny wrote this exhilarating thriller in the early 1970s, but was never published until now. The story line is fast-paced from the reunion of former criminal partners in Wiley¿s gallery and picks ups speed and several plausible twists as the hero hops continents working for the CIA. The plot contains a historical feel as the war of the moment was Viet Nam. Readers will appreciate this exciting detective tale as Ovid uses his crime experiences as he believes the same skills are needed for sleuthing.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 20, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Dead Man's Brother by Roger Zelazny

    Hard Case Crime does it again. The latest installment The Dead Man¿s Brother is from six time Hugo award winner Roger Zelazny. Zelazny¿s style is as sharp as a new machete with enough wit to keep the pages moving.<BR/><BR/>The story revolves around ex art smuggler turned legit art dealer Ovid Wiley, whose life takes a turn for the worse when Ovid¿s old partner turns up dead on his gallery floor. Being held by the NYPD for suspicion of murder, his only chance is to take a deal offered by the CIA. Now Ovid is on the trail of millions of dollars in Vatican money and the rouge priest who stole it. <BR/><BR/>Arriving in Italy, the story deepens when all Ovid¿s leads end up at Maria, his old partner¿s girlfriend and ¿good¿ friend of the priest. Having narrowly escaped with his live and causing a few causalities of his own, Ovid and Maria is off to Brail to find the priest¿s brother. The story comes to a great climax when Ovid finds what. He needs only to have to escape through the jungles of Brazil chased by the local unsavory police bent on his destruction. <BR/><BR/>I found this book to be quite the page turner, so set aside a block of time, pour yourself a glass of bourbon and be prepared to take a journey into crime, deceit and more twists than a gun man¿s barrel.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2013

    Zelazny fans and mystery fans should reed this!

    What could I say? According to what I read about this book it was an early writing of Roger Zelazny, time-wise? The book speculates early seventies, I personally think earlier. The book is great! Can't say much more without giving anything away. I don't think any Zelazny fans will be disappointed.

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  • Posted January 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Zelazny could write whatever he wanted

    And he always did a great job. Even his weaker pieces are head and shoulders above most. It was such a treat to discover this. Great plot, great characters, and Zelazny's style in pretty much unmatched. If you want a good crime story with very poetic prose, check this one out!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

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