Dead Men Kill: A Murder Mystery of Wealth, Power, and the Living Dead

Dead Men Kill: A Murder Mystery of Wealth, Power, and the Living Dead

3.0 29
by L. Ron Hubbard
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Detective Terry Lane is a standout homicide cop who thought he’d seen it all . . . until now. 

As tough as Kevin Costner as Eliot Ness of The Untouchables—and just as incorruptible—Lane has seen the darkest side of human behavior.  But he’s never seen a murder spree like this, targeting the wealthy, the powerful and the

…  See more details below

Overview

Detective Terry Lane is a standout homicide cop who thought he’d seen it all . . . until now. 

As tough as Kevin Costner as Eliot Ness of The Untouchables—and just as incorruptible—Lane has seen the darkest side of human behavior.  But he’s never seen a murder spree like this, targeting the wealthy, the powerful and the privileged.  For the evidence is clear: the killers have not emerged from the seamy underside of the city . . . but from six feet under it.  They are the walking dead, spreading terror and showing no mercy.

Following a trail of drugs, blackmail, and the twisted clues of a seductive nightclub singer, Detective Lane will have to think outside the box…or he could end up inside one, buried alive.

In 1934, while living in New York, the heart of the publishing industry, Hubbard struck up a friendship with the city’s medical examiner—a relationship that started his education in undetectable crime and provided him with authoritative clinical background for his detective stories.

“A rollicking horror yarn [that] taps into the current craze for zombies. . . . heart-pounding.” —Publishers Weekly

*An International Book Awards Winner

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A spree of inexplicable murders baffles Det. Terry Lane—until he stumbles upon proof that the victims were killed by their former servants-turned-zombies who have been brought back to life with the purpose of killing their employers. As Lane gets closer to the source, he too is targeted by the mastermind behind the murders and finds that he could be turned into one of the living dead. The unattributed narrator has all the drive, emphasis, and attitude of a classic suspense reader and provides listeners with a tension-filled atmosphere to enhance the story. Coupled with the full cast and sound effects, the production proves first rate. A Galaxy hardcover (Reviews, Feb. 22). (Feb.)
Fangoria Magazine
What you will find in DEAD MEN KILL, however, is a breezy horror/mystery where almost every sentence ends in an exclamation point (" 'Don't!' screamed Morton. 'Don't come near me! You're dead, man! Get away from me!' "). Readable in one sitting, DEAD MEN KILL is frightful fun from yesteryear.
From the Publisher

Dead Men Kill is the only zombie horror story Hubbard wrote, and the author succeeds by presenting this questionable subject in a realistic manner. He doesn't try to overexplain, but simply focuses on keeping up the story's quick pace (so we don't think about it too much). Its focus on the Haitian voodoo aspects should appeal to fans of more recent takes on the same subject, such as Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child's novel Cemetery Dance. —Publishers Weekly

"A hardboiled detective, a beautiful nightclub singer, and a throng of murderous zombies share the stage in Dead Men Kill, originally published in Thrilling Detective (Jul. 1934). R.F. Daley, Jim Meskimen, Matt Scott, John Mariano, Jennifer Aspen, and Lori Jablons deliver expert performances in this production brought fully to life with such fantastic sounds as a zombie’s unrelenting call of “I have come to kill you, Gordon,” an owl’s ominous hooting, and the urgent slamming of Det. Terry Lane’s creaky sedan door. A thrill from start to finish; recommended for all." —Raya Kuziuk, Library Journal

“For all those who think zombie literature began with the great Max (WORLD WAR Z) Brooks, think again.

Before the dawn of George A. Romero, L. Ron Hubbard (yes, the father of Scientology) wrote a pulp novella called DEAD MEN KILL, which, although probably not the first living-dead opus ever written, first appeared way back in 1934 in an issue of Thrilling Detective. Hubbard’s vintage tale has been reissued by Galaxy Press as part of their Stories from the Golden Age collection in a handsome new paperback edition, one which should please both nostalgia buffs who like fast-paced, old-fashioned noir-style prose and those who simply enjoy creeping horror from the grave.

Wealthy men are being murdered by walking corpses as part of an extortion scheme, and it’s up to hardboiled dick Terry Lane to get to the bottom of it all. Throw in a femme fatale, a talky coroner, a masked villain named “Loup-garou” and the threat of premature burial, and you have all the ingredients of what the Brits would call a “ripping yarn.” The zombies in DEAD MEN KILL are of the kind first seen in classic films like WHITE ZOMBIE and I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE: dead people brought back to life to serve as slaves to some evil genius. Sorry, not a Fulci-esque flesheater in sight.

What you will find in DEAD MEN KILL, however, is a breezy horror/mystery where almost every sentence ends in an exclamation point (“ ’Don’t!’ screamed Morton. ‘Don’t come near me! You’re dead, man! Get away from me!’ ”).

Readable in one sitting, DEAD MEN KILL is frightful fun from yesteryear.” –Fangoria Magazine

"Hubbard's rollicking horror yarn just happens to tap into the current craze for zombies. Heroic Det. Sgt. Terrence "Terry" Lane looks into a deeply disturbing series of murders of powerful businessmen. Dawn Drayden, a pretty Club Haitian entertainer, confirms Lane's hunch that the killers are dead men "coming back from the grave and killing their employers." The zombie mastermind is the nefarious Dr. Leroux, originally of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, aka Loup-garou (or human hyena). In the end, Drayden and Lane must face heart-pounding dangers once Dr. Leroux's secrets are revealed. This fun, campy novella reflects a contemporary revenge vibe felt by those who wouldn't mind dispatching a few zombies to punish criminally inclined businessmen." —Publishers Weekly

"...It's certainly loads of fun." —Ellery Queen

Library Journal
A hardboiled detective, a beautiful nightclub singer, and a throng of murderous zombies share the stage in Dead Men Kill, originally published in Thrilling Detective (Jul. 1934). R.F. Daley, Jim Meskimen, Matt Scott, John Mariano, Jennifer Aspen, and Lori Jablons deliver expert performances in this production brought fully to life with such fantastic sounds as a zombie's unrelenting call of "I have come to kill you, Gordon," an owl's ominous hooting, and the urgent slamming of Det. Terry Lane's creaky sedan door. A thrill from start to finish; recommended for all.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592125456
Publisher:
Galaxy Press, LLC
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Mystery & Suspense Short Stories Collection
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
1,008,067
File size:
901 KB

Meet the Author

As one of the 20 top bestselling authors of all time, with more than 325 million works in circulation, L. Ron Hubbard stands alongside an illustrious company of writers. But he also stands alone—as an author who actually lived many of the stories he wrote.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Dead Men Kill: A Murder Mystery of Wealth, Power, and the Living Dead 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Lorie Lowe More than 1 year ago
Reads like a 50's detective novel. A bit slow, but still interesting enough to make you want to finish. Only 70 pages to the story and then a sneak preview to another story.
A_Lover_of_Westerns More than 1 year ago
While I normally just like to read westerns, I was sent a copy of this book to read and found it a really fun, totally unlike other zombie stories you are likely to find -- or at least different from any I was familiar with. First off, it provides a "plausible" means of creating zombies and from my earlier research on Haiti, this story is pretty much right on the mark. That there is a hard boiled detective coupled with a dangerous dame, made for a great read from beginning to end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not my usual cup of tea, but I did enjoy it.
DeniseDQ More than 1 year ago
Great mystery. Kept me captivated the whole time. If you like mysteries you'll love this one.
CouponMamaMassachusetts 10 months ago
As a die-hard zombie fan, I'm always looking for another film or novel to whet my zombie-loving appetite. Best selling American pulp fiction author L. Rob Hubbard introduces a unique perspective on the walking dead, setting his story, "Dead Men Kill," in the Golden Age of the 1930s. Originally published in a 1934 issue of the pulp fiction magazine, Thrilling Detective, "Dead Men Kill" follows Terry Lane, a police detective, through the most spine-tingling and dangerous investigation of his life. In an effort to capture a serial murderer, Lane battles the living dead, encounters a sexy vixen, and tries to evade the mysterious and deadly threats from "loup-garou." If you're looking for an action-packed, quick and easy read, "Dean Men Kill" is sure to be right up your alley. At less than 100 pages, L. Ron Hubbard's story took me less than two hours to read. While not the most elegant use of language or most flowery prose, the short chapters are engaging and leave you wanting more. The audio-drama version is equally as fast paced and suspenseful. Featuring Emmy Award-winning actor John Mariano, the audio performance includes music and sound effects that make you feel as though you're running beside Terry Lane through the cemetery and fighting off your own pack of brainless zombies. In some cases, the audio-drama acting is almost too quick paced, making it difficult to follow the story line if you're not reading along with the actors' performances. The book itself is printed on wonderfully thick paper meant to mimic the look and feel of the pulp fiction magazines in which the story was originally published and bring that Golden Age nostalgia in its readers. If you're looking for an out-of-the-box zombie tale or you just want a quick and entertaining read, "Dead Men Kill" is worth the time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is a quick read but not the most suspenseful novel. If you're into this era of science fiction you may enjoy it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
lifeasleels More than 1 year ago
In the 1930s and 1940s, readers read pulp fiction - rough cut, pulpwood paper that held stories. Pulp fiction authors were considered no-holds barred entertainers and real storytellers that were interested in thrilling plot twists, horrific villains or white knuckle adventure. Dead Men Kill was a short read - literally a matter of a few hours over two nights. (It didn't help that I found it to be quite a page turner.) I loved the story. It wasn't your typically zombie story and it held thrill and excitement and mystery. I was actually excited as it neared revealing everything that I was able to piece the puzzle together (at the last minute but still!) I highly enjoyed this and will be getting hubby to read this because I truly think he would enjoy this. I'm not sure there is anyone that wouldn't enjoy it. It isn't gross or gore-ish, but is a great, easy read. Disclosure: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hopefully I'm not the only one tired of short reads. As a faithful and avid reader, quite frankly I am tired of the painfully tedious task of finding a length-worthy work. However, I must compliment the author on the literature in question. A rather exceptional read if you enjoy a, "quickie,".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Scotman55 More than 1 year ago
[This short review is for the Kindle version] I really should get the audio version since that really dramatizes the story just like Old Time Radio, but I digress. I'm really happy with this product, how they are reprinting these pulps in inexpensive ways for us fans of these kinds of novellas. Dead Men Kill was interesting in its premise about rich businessmen being killed by their "dead" secretaries. And a detective (who gets captured and nearly killed himself) on the trail of the Hyena. What is the connection between a Haitian pharmacy, Ms. Lane the exotic dancer, and a man we don't suspect is the real mastermind (who wants to take over the city, of course). The plot is nothing new -- bad guy, cynical good guy, a police captain who "doesn't want to hear it" and a beautiful girl who is quite the backstabber! Suggested not only for Hubbard pulp fans, but anyone who enjoys those stories from the Golden Age. I have always liked these tales, since listening to the old Dick Tracy and Inner Sanctum radio shows. [[ASIN:B0029L4NMY Inner Sanctum Mysteries, Vol. 3]]
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A delicious short read. A tasty 1940's "hard boiled" detective story. Words not in use today are highlighted and defined in the (included) glossary. A must read for crime noir junkies.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago