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Dead of Night (Doc Ford Series #12)
     

Dead of Night (Doc Ford Series #12)

3.4 19
by Randy Wayne White, Dick Hill (Read by)
 

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Later, my conscience would play the inevitable game of “What if . . .” What if I had stopped by Jobe’s home on Friday morning instead of Sunday night? What if I hadn’t interrupted the two people who were alternately interrogating and beating him? Would he have lived? Or would he have died? And what would have happened then?

It started when

Overview

Later, my conscience would play the inevitable game of “What if . . .” What if I had stopped by Jobe’s home on Friday morning instead of Sunday night? What if I hadn’t interrupted the two people who were alternately interrogating and beating him? Would he have lived? Or would he have died? And what would have happened then?

It started when Doc Ford got the call from his old friend Frieda Matthews - her reclusive biologist brother Jobe wasn’t answering the phone. Could Doc check on him? Ford can’t think of a reason not to, but soon he will think of a hundred. Not only will it be one of the worst scenes he has ever encountered, but the consequences of that visit will draw him into the heart of a nightmare. A catastrophe is coming to Florida, and just maybe there is something Ford can do about it - but he doesn’t know how or where or when . . . or even if he is already too late.

Filled with the remarkable prose and rich atmosphere that have won White so many fans, and featuring some of the best suspense characters in fiction, Dead of Night is White’s biggest thriller yet - “like strapping yourself onto the exposed bow of a South Florida airboat” (The Miami Herald).

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The past 11 adventures featuring Marion "Doc" Ford have found the marine biologist/ex-black ops specialist placed in more than his fair share of dangerous situations, and this entry is no exception. When old friend Frieda Matthews asks Ford to visit her eccentric brother, he reluctantly agrees-and soon finds himself wrapped up in an insidious real estate scam with bioterrorism at its core. Having narrated two previous Doc Ford audiobooks, Hill possesses an excellent grasp of White's prose and his diverse cast of characters. He supplies Doc with an appropriately earnest, world-weary voice and nicely captures the heavy Russian accent of the sadistic assassin, Dasha. His pi ce de r sistance, however, is his portrayal of Ford's burned-out hipster sidekick, Tomlinson. A quintessential non-materialistic/antiestablishment throwback to the '60s who finds himself incredibly wealthy, Tomlinson is the one source of levity in this dark thriller, and Hill delivers his confused musings with the finesse of a professional comedian. Simultaneous release with the Putnam hardcover (Reviews, Feb. 28). (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This time out, Doc Ford must cope with a wicked plot to kill off practically everybody. Marion "Doc" Ford, the marine biologist with the brain of a nerd and the heart of Rambo, begins his 12th (Tampa Burn, 2004, etc.) reluctantly. Frieda Matthews, a friend of long standing, asks Doc to check on her "identical twin" brother, reclusive world-class biologist Jobe Applebee, who's been even more reclusive than usual. To Doc, the invasion of another's privacy amounts to venial sin, yet Frieda has never been one to fret over nothing. So Doc checks-too late, as it turns out. Bad guys have gotten at poor Jobe in indescribable ways. Wherefore? Since Jobe can't tell him-and soon Frieda can't either-Doc must begin his investigation from square one. Almost at once he learns disquieting truths about the life cycle of the Guinea worm and the terrible things that can happen when parasites are pressed to serve as weapons of mass destruction. Are fanatical ecoterrorists at work here? Or something older, like a murderously greedy wolf in another wolf's clothing?Not much story, but Doc's fans are used to that. What might bother a few, though, is a certain lack of engagement, as if even Doc can't take the goings-on all that seriously. First printing of 75,000; author tour
From the Publisher
“TAUT. GRIPPING. FAST-PACED. TERRIFYING. A PAGE-TURNER. Those words and more describe Dead of Night.”—Omaha World-Herald

“DEAD OF NIGHT IS EVERYTHING YOU LOOK FOR IN A THRILLER AND MORE.”—*The Miami Herald

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596008496
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
02/28/2006
Series:
Doc Ford Series , #12
Edition description:
Abridged
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 6.10(h) x 0.80(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
“TAUT. GRIPPING. FAST-PACED. TERRIFYING. A PAGE-TURNER. Those words and more describe Dead of Night.”—Omaha World-Herald

“DEAD OF NIGHT IS EVERYTHING YOU LOOK FOR IN A THRILLER AND MORE.”—*The Miami Herald

Meet the Author

Randy Wayne White is the author of seventeen previous Doc Ford novels and four collections of nonfiction. He lives in an old house built on an Indian mound in Pineland, Florida.

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Dead of Night (Doc Ford Series #12) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
johnwillie More than 1 year ago
Easy reading Good book
harstan More than 1 year ago
Dr. Marion Ford owns Sanibel Biological which sells marine samples to schools and research laboratories around the countries. He looks like a nerdy scientist but that is a cover for he is part of a deep cover operations team. Members of the group provide its agents with legitimate and mobile professions. Ford¿s job collecting marine samples takes him all over the world, a great cover when on an assignment.--- As a favor to a friend he checks on her brother Jobe Applebee because he hasn¿t answered the phone for a few days. Marion sees a woman Dasha beating and torturing Jobe. Marion chases her and her partner away but meanwhile the man commits suicide. Guinea worms crawl out of his body. A cunning criminal, Dr. Desmond Stokes is letting loose these and other types of exotics so that property values in the area will drop and he can buy prime land cheap. He seeks Jake¿s computer which might have the cure for the worm infestation. He wants to develop it so that the world will look at him as a savior while the clever and strong Dasha has orders to eliminate Ford who has the computer files and knows who is behind the loosening of the poisonous exotics on an unsuspecting state. --- Randy Wayne White has written a high powered bio-terror thriller. The action starts during the first chapter and picks up speed, taking the reader on a roller coaster ride full of chilling terror. In the wrong hands bio-terrorists can devastate an area and there is little anyone can do to stop them until after the mission is accomplished and the results become known. This is a very scary novel because it is based on a realistic premise one that people can¿t guard against. DEAD OF NIGHT is a scintillating action adventure thriller.--- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Have read and liked Whites books so far. I'm not sure I'll be reading many more though, there seems to be a pension for villains with increasingly perverted sexual demands and frankly, I'm not a fan.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
A long time fan, this book was great until the last few chapters. It felt like he was in a hurry to finish the book. I thought the ending was very unsatisfying and not finished with the detail required. I didn't believe the change in character of the female antagonist as the story ended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Dead of Night', is right up there with all White's novels, Great. I have read them all, and think 'Dead of Night' was very interesting, and well written. Randy gets the readers attention, and keeps it throught out the novel. Although 'James Hall' has more expericence, sentence structure, and even the more extensive vocabulary, I like White's books better because they are a faster and easier read full of familiar sterotypes, cliches and situations. The first chapter of 'Dead of Night' was very familiar to me, I felt as tho I were there watching the whole thing, throughout the entire novel, I felt I had a connection!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had the book on hold at our library, I am a die hard RWW fan, however, I was somewhat disappointed with this latest novel! The story seemed to go on without cause, the characters were not as colorful nor interesting as White's usual list of bad guys! What happened? Mr. White were you distracted by your new love to write in your grand fashion? I hope we get back Mr. White's wonderful characters and stories soon (in the next novel hopefully) I will continue to be a fan, and hopefully, you will not disppoint us in your next novel...... A grandmother in waiting! Mary Christensen
Guest More than 1 year ago
Harriet must be in Love with Randy Wayne White, 'Dead of Night', is HORRIBLE, short croppy sentences, and White wanders off on subjects that just don't have anything to do with the novel or plot! White's 'Dead of Night', has alot of similarities to James W. Hall's 'Forests of the Night'!