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Deadfall Hotel
     

Deadfall Hotel

4.2 4
by Steve Rasnic Tem
 

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The Deadfall Hotel is where our nightmares go, it’s where the dead pause to rest between worlds, and it’s where Richard Carter and his daughter Serena go to rediscover life — if the things at the hotel don’t kill them first.

Think of it as the vacation resort of the collective unconscious.

With the powerful prose that has earned him

Overview

The Deadfall Hotel is where our nightmares go, it’s where the dead pause to rest between worlds, and it’s where Richard Carter and his daughter Serena go to rediscover life — if the things at the hotel don’t kill them first.

Think of it as the vacation resort of the collective unconscious.

With the powerful prose that has earned him awards and accolades, Steve Rasnic Tem explores the roots of fear and society’s fascination with things horrific, using the many-layered metaphor of the Deadfall Hotel. Drawing inspiration from literary touchstones John Gardner and Peter Straub, Tem elegantly delves into the dark corners of the human spirit. There he finds not only our fears, but ultimately our hopes.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“No ordinary hotel” but more “a state of mind,” the eponymous setting for this haunting dark fantasy from horror eminence Tem (The Book of Days) provides the perfect backdrop for thoughtful ruminations on death and grieving. Richard Carter is still mourning the death of his beloved wife when he accepts a job as new caretaker at the Deadfall Hotel. Once Richard and his adolescent daughter are established there, it becomes clear that the hotel’s weird patrons and scary vermin are avatars of death that reflect Richard’s inability to accept Abby’s demise. Though Richard’s strange encounters unfold episodically, they build to a revelatory climax that Tem engineers perfectly. His interwoven reflections on the cathartic value of horror entertainments add considerably to the novel’s emotional impact. Gorey-like pen-and-ink illustrations by John Kenn Mortensen perfectly complement the text. Also included is the 1986 short story from which the novel grew. Agent: Robert Fleck, Professional Media Services. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781907992834
Publisher:
Rebellion
Publication date:
04/17/2012
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
795,786
Product dimensions:
5.04(w) x 7.62(h) x 0.76(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Steve Rasnic Tem is an author, artist, and poet. His works have earned him numerous international literary awards, including the World Fantasy Award. Joe R. Lansdale has referred to Steve as “a school of writing unto himself,” and others have compared his work to that of Ray Bradbury, Dino Buzatti, Raymond Carver, and Franz Kafka. Tem has long proven his understanding of the dark parts of the human soul, with books and stories that have earned him 9 Bram Stoker Award nominations (3 wins) and 7 International Horror Guild Award nominations (2 wins, plus one story nominated for the 2007 awards). Deadfall Hotel is the product of nearly twenty years of work.

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Deadfall Hotel 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Eric_J_Guignard More than 1 year ago
REVIEWED: Deadfall Hotel WRITTEN BY: Steve Rasnic Tem PUBLISHED: April, 2012 Deadfall Hotel is a rather sweet, at times sad, at times scary, novel which is more fantasy than horror. It includes the familiar monster tropes, but they are all fused with human pains, made believable in whatever condition ails the character, sending them to convalesce and, most likely, eventually perish in the namesake hotel. I wouldn’t call this book a “page-turner” as it is slow and sentimental, but that is what I enjoy about this author; he captures the subtleties of emotion – fear, sadness, hope – as masterfully as any “literary” writer, while at the same time building a compelling supernatural environment. A few of the sections seemed to go on for too long, such as the King of the Cats, while other sections, I wanted to learn more of, such as the actual history of the house, the pool that only occasionally appears, and the several of the other background “inhabitants” that make brief cameo appearances, but never again materialize. Deadfall Hotel is best read in a leisurely pace, ideally in a windowed nook with gloomy rain falling outside, and a nice mug of chamomile tea. Four and a quarter out of Five stars
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