Deadhead Social Science: "You Ain't Gonna Learn What You Don't Want to Know" / Edition 1

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Overview

Deadhead Social Science is a collection of papers examining various aspects of the complex subculture surrounding the rock band, the Grateful Dead. Deadheads, as Grateful Dead fans are called, followed the band from venue to venue until the band announced their dissolution in December of 1995. Deadhead Social Science addresses the questions: What is a Deadhead? How does a Deadhead identity evolve? Why would a person choose an identity that would be viewed negatively by a larger society? Why are Deadheads viewed negatively by the larger society? Is the Deadhead community a popular religion? How did a rock band develop a religious following? The book also examines the music, the role of vendors, and the reaction by "host" communities to the Grateful Dead and its following. One key theme in Deadhead Social Science is the interconnections among teaching, research, and personal interests written from a variety of social science disciplinary traditions.
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Editorial Reviews

Qualitative Sociology
This book is a must read for those with a passion for teaching, for those who are truly engaged in their research and, perhaps most importantly, for those who can conceive of research and teaching as one in the same enterprise.
— Vincent J. Rosigno, (Ohio State University)
Contemporary Sociology
Well-edited and clearly written...it should appeal to lay or academic audiences interested in subcultures, identity and those who would like to meld their teaching and research interests into that of teacher/scholar. As a whole, the books shows us how a subculture can lead to interest among students, how they can see the world through various lenses, and the richness that can result when students and teachers collaborate. It seems that rarely do researchers have a chance to match their research and leisure activities. In this instance, they have done both and produced scholarly results.
— William F. Danaher, (College of Charleston)
Qualitative Sociology - Vincent J. Rosigno
This book is a must read for those with a passion for teaching, for those who are truly engaged in their research and, perhaps most importantly, for those who can conceive of research and teaching as one in the same enterprise.
Contemporary Sociology - William F. Danaher
Well-edited and clearly written...it should appeal to lay or academic audiences interested in subcultures, identity and those who would like to meld their teaching and research interests into that of teacher/scholar. As a whole, the books shows us how a subculture can lead to interest among students, how they can see the world through various lenses, and the richness that can result when students and teachers collaborate. It seems that rarely do researchers have a chance to match their research and leisure activities. In this instance, they have done both and produced scholarly results.
Journal of Anthropological Research, Vol. 58, 2002 - Russell Cole
the book is a very well written and edited example of the value of encouraging students to pursue their own interests in their academic endeavors. There are likely areas of study—such as Deadhead subculture—that almost require the work of students, less constrained by academic career concerns than their professors, to get the ball rolling. The Grateful Dead were so loved by their fans in large part because the fans were an integral part of the ongoing musical and cultural exploration, and Adams and Sardiello demonstrate the fruits of applying the same collaborative spirit in an academic context.
Howard S. Becker
Research can be fun, fun can be research. Teachers can be students, students can be teachers. Adams and Sardiello prove that beyond doubting in this well-researched and interesting book.
Library Journal
Coeditor Adams (sociology, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro) has compiled a dozen essays by undergraduate and graduate students who studied the Grateful Dead subculture of the 1980s and early 1990s with her. After outlining the Dead's history and subculture and the cooperative learning of her Deadhead social-science class, Adams offers a quantitative analysis of the songs the Dead played and the evolution of a Dead cover band. In an engaging section on spirituality, one student examines the Dead subculture as a secular religion, and another focuses on a communal, dervish-like group that incorporated Dead lyrics into their beliefs. Four essays describe the characteristics of the Dead subculture and examine various motivations for joining the Deadhead community. Though usually professing to be Deadheads, the authors over-intellectualize a band and fans who pride themselves on spontaneity and serendipity. They tend to shackle the free-minded Deadhead spirit with sociological theories that add little to an understanding of the Deadhead phenomenon. Not recommended.--Dave Szatmary, Univ. of Washington Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742502512
  • Publisher: AltaMira Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2000
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.86 (w) x 8.94 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Rebecca G. Adams is professor of sociology and assistant to the dean on distance learning at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Her publications include four books and numerous scholarly articles, and she serves on the editorial boards of Contemporary Sociology and Personal Relationships. She attended her first Dead show in 1970. Robert Sardiello is adjunct professor of sociology at Nassau Community College. He has published several scholarly pieces concerning Deadheads and is currently working toward his Ph.D. at the University of New York, Stony Brook. He attended his first Dead show in 1977.
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Table of Contents

chapter 1 Part I: Introduction chapter 2 "What Goes Around Comes Around": Collaborative Research and Learning chapter 3 Part II: Music chapter 4 The Grammar of the Grateful Dead chapter 5 Other People Play the Music: Improvisation as Social Interaction chapter 6 Part III: Spirituality chapter 7 The Deadhead Community: Popular Religion in Contemporary American Culture chapter 8 "We Were Given this Dance": Music and Meaning in the Early Unlimited Devotional Family chapter 9 Part IV: Outside the Show chapter 10 Vending at Dead Shows: The Bizarre Bazaar chapter 11 Community Reaction to Deadhead Subculture chapter 12 Part V: Identity chapter 13 Becoming a Deadhead chapter 14 An Eriksonian Perspective on the Journey Through Deadhead Adulthood chapter 15 Self-Concept and Ego Extension Among Grateful Dead Fans chapter 16 Deadheads and Dichotomies: Mediated and Negotiated Readings chapter 17 Part VI: Conclusion chapter 18 Studying Deadhead Subculture
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