Deadline Artists: America's Greatest Newspaper Columns by John Avlon, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Deadline Artists: America's Greatest Newspaper Columns

Deadline Artists: America's Greatest Newspaper Columns

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by John Avlon
     
 

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America's story has always been best told in its newspapers. From the local and mundane-crime blotters, crop prices, and Sunday sermons-to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in our nation's culture and history.
Newspapers in America have always been the crucible where our passions and debates are tried by the only judge

Overview

America's story has always been best told in its newspapers. From the local and mundane-crime blotters, crop prices, and Sunday sermons-to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in our nation's culture and history.
Newspapers in America have always been the crucible where our passions and debates are tried by the only judge this nation respects: public opinion. At a time of great transition in the news media, Deadline Artists celebrates the relevance of the newspaper column through the simple power of excellent writing. It is an inspiration for a new generation of writers—whether their medium is print or digital-looking to learn from the best of their predecessors.
Contributors include: Jimmy Breslin, Mike Royko, Murray Kempton, Ernie Pyle, Peggy Noonan, Thomas L. Friedman, David Brooks, Mitch Albom, Dorothy Thompson, Ernest Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, Fanny Fern, Richard Harding Davis, Grantland Rice, Will Rogers, Orson Welles, Langston Hughes, Woody Guthrie, Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Theodore Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken, Ben Hecht, Westbrook Pegler, Heywood Broun, Damon Runyon, W. C. Heinz, Jimmy Cannon, Red Smith, Russell Baker, Art Buchwald, William F. Buckley, Hunter S. Thompson, Pete Dexter, Carl Hiaasen, Dave Barry, Leonard Pitts, Anna Quindlen, Thomas Boswell, Tony Kornheiser, Kathleen Parker, Maureen Dowd, Bob Herbert, Michael Kinsley, Cynthia Tucker, George Will, Jack Newfield, Mike Barnicle, Pete Hamill and Steve Lopez.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Starred Review.

"It is the great American art form, read by millions every day." When these eloquent, compassionate newspaper columns were first delivered, they were treated as individual works of art, almanacs to suit any disposition. Well-catalogued and categorized, this exultant retrospective of American journalism seems ideal for today's attention spans and travel schedules. In the most memorable modern excerpt from the section "Wars and Other Foreign Affairs," Pete Hamill stands in a "pale gray wilderness" following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and tells readers: "As I write, it remains present tense." In other sections, Hunter S. Thompson and O. Henry reveal a raw, emotional, and entertaining style of journalism; a formula that Jimmy Breslin's surreal "'Are You John Lennon?'" piece surely encapsulates. Avlon, Angelo, and Louis's glorious compilation "is a chance to be there at moments when America changes, for better or for worse." Free-flowing to the very end, lasting drops of pure wisdom come in the form of Mary Schmich's infamous "sunscreen" composition, while Benjamin Franklin's 1757 sermon of advice literally offers words to live by. "Well done is better than well said," Franklin writes, but as far as this essential anthology goes, it's so well done, there's nothing left to say.
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-- Peggy Noonan

"An indispensible anthology of an American art form -- a broad and brilliantly chosen compilation of the best newspaper column writing past and present -- and a real feast. I couldn't stop reading. The stories, yarns, insights and characters -- the immediacy and passion -- still resonate, still make you laugh, and think."
-- Mike Barnicle

"Columnists [are] like brilliant photographers using words to deliver an instant snapshot of history viewed through their own lens. John Avlon, Jesse Angelo, and Errol Louis have performed a huge public service by capturing hundreds of those moments with this collection."
--The American Journalism Review

"This may be the most addictive journalism book ever: dozens of glittering columns on topics Olympic and ordinary, most produced on deadline by a pantheon of outstanding writers, a collection that should squash any doubts that journalism should be literature."
From the Publisher
"An indispensible anthology of an American art form — a broad and brilliantly chosen compilation of the best newspaper column writing past and present — and a real feast. I couldn't stop reading. The stories, yarns, insights and characters — the immediacy and passion — still resonate, still make you laugh, and think." — Peggy Noonan

"Columnists [are] like brilliant photographers using words to deliver an instant snapshot of history viewed through their own lens. John Avlon, Jesse Angelo, and Errol Louis have performed a huge public service by capturing hundreds of those moments with this collection." — Mike Barnicle

"It is the great American art form, read by millions every day." When these eloquent, compassionate newspaper columns were first delivered, they were treated as individual works of art, almanacs to suit any disposition. Well-catalogued and categorized, this exultant retrospective of American journalism seems ideal for today's attention spans and travel schedules. In the most memorable modern excerpt from the section "Wars and Other Foreign Affairs," Pete Hamill stands in a "pale gray wilderness" following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and tells readers: "As I write, it remains present tense." In other sections, Hunter S. Thompson and O. Henry reveal a raw, emotional, and entertaining style of journalism; a formula that Jimmy Breslin's surreal "'Are You John Lennon?'" piece surely encapsulates. Avlon, Angelo, and Louis's glorious compilation "is a chance to be there at moments when America changes, for better or for worse." Free-flowing to the very end, lasting drops of pure wisdom come in the form of Mary Schmich's infamous "sunscreen" composition, while Benjamin Franklin's 1757 sermon of advice literally offers words to live by. "Well done is better than well said," Franklin writes, but as far as this essential anthology goes, it's so well done, there's nothing left to say." — Publisher's Weekly Starred Review

"This may be the most addictive journalism book ever: dozens of glittering columns on topics Olympic and ordinary, most produced on deadline by a pantheon of outstanding writers, a collection that should squash any doubts that journalism should be literature." — The American Journalism Review, Winter 2011

Mike Barnicle
“Columnists [are] like brilliant photographers using words to deliver an instant snapshot of history viewed through their own lens. John Avlon, Jesse Angelo, and Errol Louis have performed a huge public service by capturing hundreds of those moments with this collection.”
The American Journalism Review
“This may be the most addictive journalism book ever: dozens of glittering columns on topics Olympic and ordinary, most produced on deadline by a pantheon of outstanding writers, a collection that should squash any doubts that journalism should be literature.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590204290
Publisher:
The Overlook Press
Publication date:
09/21/2011
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
691,222
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

John Avlon is a senior columnist for Newsweek and The Daily Beast as well as a CNN contributor. He lives in New York City.

Jesse Angelo is Publisher of the New York Post and lives in New York City

Errol Louis is the political anchor of NY1 News, where he hosts the nightly program "Inside City Hall." He lives in New York City

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Deadline Artists : America's Greatest Newspaper Columns 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book as a gift for my daughter-in-law who is a journalist. I had to thumb through it, of course, and ended up reading every word. Well-chosen columns and wonderful writing, some of which I remembered from their original publications. I loved this, and so will its recipient when I finally get it to her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book! My favorite thing growing up was taking the newspaper in the morning and lying on the living room floor reading it. If you;re anything like me...or you know someone like me...get this book. It's a compendium of the best work of the best newspaper columnists of all time. The three editors are all columnists in their own right, and it strikes me as both a labor of love and a remarkable documentation of an art form changing radically in the age of the Internet. Politics, sports, tragedy, humanity.this book is frankly like addicting popcorn for any longtime fan of newspapers and/or plain great writing.