Deadly!: The Truth About the Most Dangerous Creatures on Earth
  • Deadly!: The Truth About the Most Dangerous Creatures on Earth
  • Deadly!: The Truth About the Most Dangerous Creatures on Earth

Deadly!: The Truth About the Most Dangerous Creatures on Earth

by Nicola Davies, Neal Layton
     
 

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Lions and scorpions and lethal little jellyfish, oh my! Kids will sink their teeth into this fascinating look at nature’s fiercest creatures.

Sometimes nature can be nasty: snakes that spit poison, insects with exploding bottoms, and tigers that have you for dinner. Throughout the animal kingdom, creatures are equipped with lethal weapons, from

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Overview

Lions and scorpions and lethal little jellyfish, oh my! Kids will sink their teeth into this fascinating look at nature’s fiercest creatures.

Sometimes nature can be nasty: snakes that spit poison, insects with exploding bottoms, and tigers that have you for dinner. Throughout the animal kingdom, creatures are equipped with lethal weapons, from finger-length fangs to toxic tentacles, and have ingenious ways of killing one another — poisoning, dive-bombing, strangling, and even electrocuting! Discover the murderous methods of attack and defense that make animals armed, dangerous, and deadly.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Nature isn’t always pretty—in fact, sometimes it’s downright nasty. In this squat volume, the sixth nature-themed collaboration from this duo, Davies strikes a light tongue-in-cheek tone to explore hostile animal behavior. Layton’s characteristically deadpan cartoons show animals using an arsenal of defense mechanisms and demonstrating predatory prowess. A viper injects poison into a mouse, a bombardier beetle “sprays boiling toxic liquid out of its rear end,” and a crocodile devours a bespectacled zebra (“The crocodile then performs the so-called ‘death roll,’ clamping its jaws around a body part—such as a head or leg—and spinning in the water to twist it off”). While educating readers about the fascinating ways animals kill one another, Davies also speaks to the importance of nature conservation and the human impact on wildlife. Ages 8–up. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Miranda McClain
From the tiny carpenter ant to the mighty African lion the animal kingdom is full of deadly killers. Not all may be lethal enough to kill a person but they are powerful meat-eaters all the same. Kids who thrive on excitement will thrill at the gory but sometimes comical illustrations in this fascinatingly informative book about the many different ways animals kill one another. This nonfiction book, that reads more like a comic book, delves into the biology of animal food chains that parents often try to shield their children from. Yet, the book manages to do so in a kid-friendly and even humorous fashion. Readers will delight in being horrified by facts such as how many people were killed by wolves in the state of Indiana in 1878, or the Australian funnel-web spider's ability to survive twenty-four hours at the bottom of a swimming pool. Surely not only the child prone to horror will find something of interest in these pages and perhaps will help readers wise-up enough to stay safe in a world filled with creatures that kill instinctively. Reviewer: Miranda McClain
School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—This humorous and fact-filled book is chock-full of fun. From ants to grizzly bears, from beetles to falcons, these poisonous and armed-and-dangerous creatures will delight young readers. With hilarity and information, the opening pages describe the HDR, or Human Deadliness Rating, of various creatures. The book is enhanced with full-page illustrations and cartoon panels that lighten the text and make the content less alarming. The descriptions of "the ways animals kill each other" are handled flawlessly for children. It's important to note that the book also addresses the crucial roles predators play in their various ecosystems, how humans are threatening some habitats, how some of the poisons are actually lifesaving, and how humans have a responsibility to keep all of these animals safe. The illustration-filled index and glossary add to the book's usefulness. Teachers and librarians looking to teach the Common Core Standards and expository writing will delight in this book and the dynamic way it will engage children.—Nancy Jo Lambert, Ruth Borchardt Elementary, Plano, TX
Kirkus Reviews
Davies (Talk, Talk, Squawk!, 2011) rips viciously into another popular topic with this gallery of animals "decked out for killing"--from tiny venomous spiders to big cats for whom humans are just slow-moving "meals-on-legs." Dishing up appetizing facts and observations ("The pack may start to eat even before their victim is actually dead"), the author opens big with "Killer Cats," feral canines, sharks and other carnivorous macro-creatures. Then she seats a guest list of such smaller fry as owls, snakes, "[t]eeny and [t]oxic" box jellyfish and spiders around Nature's table, leaving room for latecomers with defense mechanisms like noxious sprays (bombardier beetle) or poison skin (puffer fish). Following delicious cautionary notes about smart and stupid human behavior around wild animals (and an off-flavored remark about the dangers of working in "poor tropical countries"), she rounds out the banquet with assorted amuse-bouches relating to the importance of predators to ecosystems and the potential uses of venoms in medical research. Layton garnishes his doodled cartoons with can't-end-well dialogue ("here snakey, snakey…") in balloons and occasional splashes of gore. Despite all this, all these creatures look like Twinkies next to the unmentioned microbial clan. Easily digestible, if not particularly nutritious. (index, glossary) (Nonfiction. 7-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763662318
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
03/26/2013
Series:
Animal Science Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
1,364,654
Product dimensions:
9.70(w) x 5.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
NC1230L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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