Dear Papa, Dear Charley: The Peregrinations of a Revolutionary Aristocrat, as Told by Charles Carroll of Carrollton and His Father, Charles Carroll of Annapolis, with Sundry Observations on Bastardy, Child-Rearing, Romance, Matrimony, Commerce, Tobacco, S

Overview

This compelling collection of correspondence between a father and a son documents the history of eighteenth-century America through the intimate story of a family and the journey from boyhood to political prominence of its most illustrious member, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Beginning in the late 1740s, when "Papa" (Charles Carroll of Annapolis) sent "Charley" (Charles Carroll of Carrollton) away from his ...

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Overview

This compelling collection of correspondence between a father and a son documents the history of eighteenth-century America through the intimate story of a family and the journey from boyhood to political prominence of its most illustrious member, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Beginning in the late 1740s, when "Papa" (Charles Carroll of Annapolis) sent "Charley" (Charles Carroll of Carrollton) away from his native Maryland to be educated in Europe, the letters present a new perspective on colonial and Revolutionary America as the lived experience of Roman Catholics, whose defiant adherence to their faith denied them the civil rights and guarantees—including the right to hold office and to vote—that their Protestant counterparts enjoyed. This context accentuates the drama of Charley's rise to power during the Revolution, the necessity of the political and economic compromises he felt compelled to make, and the ultimately tragic personal price exacted by his success. Bringing the Carroll's public and private lives sharply into focus, these volumes present the past in its fullest human dimensions.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
At its most human and basic level, it is the moving account of a family's successes and failures over a period of more than five decades. As American history, it is an extraordinary panorama of the nation's politics, society, and economics at the founding. These volumes are a gem! (Barbara B. Oberg, Princeton University)

These superbly edited volumes illuminate, in fascinating detail, the complex and compelling connections between the history of an extraordinary family and the epochal changes that transformed Maryland and the Anglo-American world. The publication of this rich and revealing documentary edition is cause for celebration. (Peter S. Onuf, University of Virginia)

Peter S. Onuf
These superbly edited volumes illuminate, in fascinating detail, the complex and compelling connections between the history of an extraordinary family and the epochal changes that transformed Maryland and the Anglo-American world. The publication of this rich and revealing documentary edition is cause for celebration.
Barbara B. Oberg
At its most human and basic level, it is the moving account of a family's successes and failures over a period of more than five decades. As American history, it is an extraordinary panorama of the nation's politics, society, and economics at the founding. These volumes are a gem!
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Ronald Hoffman is director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and professor of history at the College of William and Mary. He is editor of the Charles Carroll of Carrollton Papers and author of Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland: A Carroll Saga, 1500-1782

Sally D. Mason is associate editor of the Carroll Papers and assistant to the director of the Institute.

Eleanor S. Darcy is former assistant editor of the Carroll Papers.

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Read an Excerpt

Dear Papa, Dear Charley

The Peregrinations of a Revolutionary Aristocrat, as Told by Charles Carroll of Carrollton and His Father, Charles Carroll of Annapolis, with Sundry Observations on Bastardy, Child-Rearing, Romance, Matrimony, Commerce, Tobacco, Slavery, and the Politics of Revolutionary America

The University of North Carolina Press

Copyright © 2001 University of North Carolina Press
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8078-2649-2


Preface

Descended from the O'Carrolls, a Gaelic Irish sept whose ancestral territory lay principally in what is today the Republic of Ireland's County Offaly, Charles Carroll of Carrollton's grandfather, a man historians have designated Charles Carroll the Settler, was the first Carroll to leave Europe for North America. Arriving in Maryland on October 1, 1688, he brought with him an appointment as attorney general in the colony's proprietary government and a determination to reverse the fate that English rule had imposed upon his Catholic kin. By the time of the Settler's birth in 1661, his father and other close relatives had already lost their lands and much of their wealth to confiscation as a consequence of their participation in the 1641 rebellion. The bitter memory of this and other similar injustices found expression in the Settler's defiant personality and fueled his ambition to prosper and prevail in Maryland, a province known for its official hospitality to Roman Catholics. Indicative both of his remembrance of the past and his designs for the future, the Settler changed the motto on his family's crest from "In fide et in bello forte" ("Strong in faith and war") to "Ubicumque cum libertate" ("Anywhere so long as there be freedom").

The optimism suggested by that alteration proved to be short-lived. Scarcely had Charles Carroll the Settler reached Maryland when the changes wrought by England's Glorious Revolution crossed the Atlantic to cause major problems for Catholics in Lord Baltimore's supposedly tolerant colony. Using the ouster of James II and the subsequent elevation of William and Mary to the English throne as a pretext, Maryland Protestants vented their long-standing jealousy of the proprietor's practice of awarding the most lucrative government posts to Catholics through a "risinge in arms" that transferred the right to govern the province from the proprietary family to the crown. In consolidating their victory, the Associators, as the Protestant rebels were known, began to put in place in the colony the same kinds of legal restrictions that circumscribed the lives of Catholics in England and Ireland, with the result that by 1704 Maryland law forbade Catholics to worship publicly, to give their children a Catholic education, and to hold public office without swearing oaths inimical to the Catholic religion.

Deprived by his allegiance to his faith of his post as attorney general with its promising implications of access to political power, the Settler found other means of acquiring wealth and influence. Twice wed, he advanced himself measurably through both unions, especially the second, which made him the son-in-law of Colonel Henry Darnall I, Maryland's most powerful Catholic and protector of Lord Baltimore's extensive propertied interests. Quickly becoming Darnall's protégé and then his confidante, the Settler made himself so valuable that, upon Darnall's death in 1711, Lord Baltimore transferred to him all that gentleman's offices and responsibilities. Similarly, the Settler began his steady acquisition of land with the 1,381 acres Darnall bestowed upon him as a wedding gift, and at his death in 1720, the 47,777 acres he had accumulated made him the largest landowner in the province.

In addition to his activities as Lord Baltimore's representative and as a planter, the Settler developed extensive mercantile interests, practiced law in those courts that did not require the swearing of the noxious oaths, and began about 1700 to lend money on bonds and mortgages, an undertaking he pursued tenaciously and with such skill that by 1714 he had become the colony's largest lender. The value of the legacy he bequeathed to his heirs attests the full measure of his success: the total worth of his assets, excluding land, amounted to u7,535 and constituted the largest personal estate that had ever been probated in Maryland to that time.

Unfortunately for his co-religionists and his descendants, Charles Carroll the Settler's political ambitions failed to reap similar rewards. Following the return of Maryland's government to the newly Protestant proprietary family in 1715, the Settler made a bold attempt to reclaim for Roman Catholics the privileges of officeholding they had enjoyed under the Lords Baltimore prior to 1690. Instead he succeeded only in goading the Protestant power structure into enacting further restrictions, the most onerous being a law depriving Catholics of the right to vote. They would not regain the franchise until the American Revolution.

On July 1, 1720, Charles Carroll the Settler died. Eighteen-year-old Charles, his eldest son and heir, was called home from school in France to assume responsibility for his family's affairs in behalf of his mother, his younger brother Daniel, and his two younger sisters, Mary and Eleanor. By 1742, Charles, then known as Charles Carroll of Annapolis, had buried them all and assumed sole responsibility for the estate the Settler had built. Along with this considerable material inheritance, Charles Carroll of Annapolis also received an important intangible legacy-the memory of the experiences in Ireland and Maryland that spurred his father's quest to establish and make secure his Catholic family and their fortune. As their correspondence reveals, this heritage shaped Charles Carroll of Annapolis and his son, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, in remarkable ways.

1. The definitive study of this period of Maryland history is Lois Green Carr and David William Jordan, Maryland's Revolution of Government, 1689-1692 (Ithaca, N.Y., 1974).

2. Lord Baltimore still retained ownership of the colony's land and rights to specific revenues from it. To protect these interests, he maintained an active organization in Maryland during the period of royal rule, 1690-1715.

3. For a detailed analysis of the process by which the Settler built his fortune, see Ronald Hoffman, Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland: A Carroll Saga, 1500-1782 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 2000), chap. 2.

A SELECTION OF LETTERS FROM THE CARROLL PAPERS

CC to CCA and Elizabeth Brooke Blandike, Sept. the 4th: 1749 Dear Papa. & Mama.

I cannot be better satisfied with a Place than this where I hope to accomplish my Studies to your greatest satisfaction. I receiv'd your desires with the greatest joy imaginable in staying in little figures another year, where I hope either to be 1st or 2nd. I hope you & all my friends will excuse me for not writing for Yesterday falling down, I hurt my arm very much. I hope Dear Papa & Mama this will find you in a good state of health & desire you woud give my kind love & Service to all friends[.] I am, Dear Papa & Mama

Your ever loving Son Charles Carroll

CCA to CC October 9th. 1752. Dear Charley

Since mine of the 12th of Octr: 1751. I have had the pleasure of Yors: of May 25th: Augt 26[th] Febry 22d. 1752. The two first were very much interlined and Blotted, the last was more cor[rect] it is time for yo[u] now in all things to use Reflection Age quod Ages].]

Your first by Mr Lancaster who stayd in England did not reach me until last A[pril.] I am glad you are sensible of the happiness of having So good a Mar: and study to make him to [be] your Friend, and to do so you need but do your Duty, pray present my Service and Complimen[ts.]

I hope you are not in earnest longing to return to Maryland, We should be as glad to see you as [you] would be to see us, but I flatter my Self that you have so much good Sense that if it were in [your] power to come you would chuse to stay to accomplish yourself as much as possible by pur[suing] your studies; what is a man without knowledge? and how is knowledge to be acquired but by [a] long Course of Study. Your Mamma has desired you to send her your Picture in Miniature[;] if there be good Hand in Town and it be agreeable to your Superiors comply wth her Reque[st.] I will make good her promise of reimbursing you.

You have now read Cicero's Epistles and are reading his Orations, & therefore I ho[pe to] find you improve in the Stile of your Letters. That you may be acquaintd [with such?] an Author I have desired Mr Galloway to send You his Life Wrote by Middleton [& I sent?] you the Odyssy which you left behind you, Francis's Translation of Horace, and Dryd[en's] Translation of Virgil they will help you to understand those Authors well and to [enter] into the Spirit of them to aid your Judgment and form a taste in you. I have al[so] desired Mr Galloway to send you two Guineas, as to the Books carry them with [you] when you leave the Colledge, you will read them a few years hence with m[ore] pleasure than at present.

All the Letters I have or shall write to you or concerning you to any o[ne] are carefully entred in a Book so that in case you should be so unfortunate [as to] return not improvd in proportion to the Money Time and Care laid out on you [they] will at least be undeniable Testimonies of my Attention to your Welfare and a cons[tant] Reproach to you for not correspondg on your part to that attention, but to do you Justice from the Accots I have of yo[u] from Cousin Carroll Mr Newton & Mr Wappeler I have no reason to apprehend your doing otherwise than Well, and I pray my Dear Charley make it your constant Study and Endeavour to deserve the contin[uance] of theirs and my Approbation.

I desire my Service to Cousin Jackey Mar: Hoxton and Mar Warrin[g. The] latters Uncle Basil is lately married to Miss Susan Darnall; Watty['s Father] & Mother are well Give my Compliments to Mr: Molien and be assurd that [I] am My Dear Charley

Yor most Affecly Charles Carroll

Elizabeth Carroll to CC [Aug. 29, 1758]

I can not express my dear Child the Joy I felt at meeting with yr Papa nor the Satisfaction & Comfort I recd. from his Conversation concerning you[.] I find his Opinion of you just to my wishes & I am Certain that no Parent can have a greater tenderness for his Child then yrs has for you, nor repose a greater Confidence nor be more at Ease at his Sons being at so great a distance, which are all Convincing proofs of yr Merit. I perused all yr letters to yr Papa & those to me with the utmost pleasure, they are so full of tenderness & affection for us that they cou'd not fail to delight & at the same time to draw Tears from me. Yr Relations & Friends are all well except yr Aunt Jenny who has been much indisposed for some time past with a Cancer in her Breast but it is now in a fair way of geting well, she is with me & gives her tender Love to you. Watty Hoxton came to see us about 3 weeks ago he told me he wou'd answer yr letter by the first opperty. I bid him inform you that he was a going to be Marrid he replyed it wou'd Scare you to hear that peice of News therefore he wou'd not mention it to you. I donte [....] an agreable young [...] & a Roman Catholick I wish him happy but I think him quite to young to Marry.

You are always at heart my dear Charly & I am never tired asking yr Papa questions about you some times to tease, he answers me that you are a good for no thing Ugly little fellow, but when he Speaks his Real Sentiments of you there is not any thing can give me greater Comfort.

I daily pray to God to grant you his grace above all things & to take you under his protection. I have no thing more to add at present only that I am with the greatest tenderness.

Yr Affectionate & Loveing Mother Eliza. Carroll

CCA to CC March 22d 1761 Dr C[h]arley

Your Dr: Mama died the 12th Instt: having been confined to her Room since the 20th of last Decr: & to her Bed for at least the 3 last Weeks. She was to all Appearance in perfect health looked florid & well, her Complexion fine & clear when she was attacked with 3 or 4 very high fevers, these were Removed by a Blister & she was to all appearance in a fine way when she fell into a very deep Melancholy wch often affected her Senses & Understanding, a gentle Emetic contributed greatly to relieve her & restore her to her Senses, & it was repeated. In some days after the 2d Emetic she was taken with an obstinate Bilious Vomitting wch was very frequent & tormenting; from the 2d Vomit, wch I think was given on the 27th of Janry she never had a natural stool all her Evacuations downwards being procured by Clysters, however her Vomitting was much abated, & little was apprehended from it, & wt: is very remarkable she was generally very temperate & had no sensible fevers until the 5th Instt: then she also began at times to ramble in her discourse & her fevers wch.could not be removed wore her away. If 4 Physicians could have saved her I shd: still be blessed with her. Our Loss is as great as such a loss can be, to you she was a most tender Mother, to me the best of wives being a Charming Woman in every sense, remarkable for her good Sense evenness & Sweetness of her temper. She bore her tedious Sickness with great patience & Resignation, & had all the Spiritual helps the Church can bestow in such Cases. Hence, & from the Regularity of her life we have the solid Comfort of a well grounded hope that her Death was precious in the Sight of God: Charity however to one so near & dear to us prompts us to procure her ease from the pains she may suffer for such Transgressions as she may not have Attoned for in this life & therfore I desire you will apply 10 Guineas properly to that end, I have bestowed here a much larger Sum to the same purpose-

Nature can hardly support such Strokes Philosophy alone cannot administer any solid Com[fo]rt, for th" Death be the common Lot, th" many from the Creation have lost as tender mothers & dear wives & will continue to do so to the end of time, we do not find more Consolation from this Consideration than we shd: find ease in a fit of the Gout or any other disorder from the Reflection that many have & will [feel] as Excruciating pains as ours. Religion in such Cases is the only solid Comforter of the afflicted, by that we know, that the God who has Created us has a Right to dispose of us, that his Dispositions are just & mercyfull & that it is our Duty to submit to them, hence a Xtian, by Resignation (wch is his Duty) finds that ease wch nothing else can give him, & is according to Gods infinite goodness rewarded with ease in Consequence of his Obedience, Submission & Resignation. I have dwelt so long on this melancholy Subject to soften if possible the 1st. impressions it must make on you, & to help you to bear yr. loss. You have before you an Affecting instance of Mortality, life is but as the Twinkling of the Eye to Eternity, the only serious business of life is to make that Eternity a happy one & the certainest pledge of a happy Eternity is a lively habitual faith, pray earnestly for this precious faith & cherish it; having it you cannot act so inconsistently & irrationally as to offend yr: God.

Farewell my Dear Child, I pray to God to bless you & to grant you perfect Health. I am my Dr Charley

Yr: Mo: Afft: Father Cha: Carroll

PS

I have yrs of the 1st of Janry wch with yr: former I will answer soon-

CC to CCA June 10th. 1761. Dr Papa,

I received yesterday the afflicting news of my dear Mama's death. Yr. Letter, if any thing cou'd, wou'd have given some comfort: but what comfort can there be for so great a loss. I loved my Mama most tenderly: how strong how cogent were the motives of my love! How affectionate, how tender, how loving a mother was she to me! What fond delusive hopes have I entertained of seeing her again! I was too credulous: all my imaginary Joys are vanished in an instant: they are succeeded by the bitter cruel thought of never seeing more my loved lost Mother: the greatest blessing I wished for in this life was to see to enjoy my Parents after so long a separation to comfort to support them in an advanced age: one is for ever snatched from me! May God almighty Dr. Papa preserve yr. health & grant you a long life: were you to leave me too, oh then I shou'd be compleatly miserable indeed: death wou'd then be the only comforter of a sad, distressed, unhappy son. Pray Let not yr. loss affect you too deeply: it may impair yr. health: remember you are now my only consolation in this world.

(Continues...)



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Table of Contents

Volume III
Illustrations xi
Abbreviations and Short Titles xiii
Chapter 7 The Home Front, 1778-1779 1151
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, July 20, 1778 1153
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Aug. 3, 1778 1153
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Aug. 15, 1778 1154
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Aug. 29, 1778 1156
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Oct. 1, 1778 1158
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Oct. 9, 1778 1159
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Oct. 28, 1778 1160
CCA to CCC, Oct. 30, 1778 1161
CCC to CCA, Nov. 1, 1778 1162
A Resolution of the Maryland House of Delegates, [Nov. 14, 1778] 1164
CCA to CCC, Nov. 16, 1778 1164
CCC to CCA, Nov. 18, 1778 1165
A Letter from CCA on the Repeal of the Tender Law, Nov. 23, 1778 1166
William Buchanan to CCC, Nov. 25, 1778 1173
CCA to CCC, Nov. 30, 1778 1174
CCC to CCA, Dec. 1, 1778 1175
CCA's Account of Paper Money Paid for Sterling, [May 6, 1777-Dec. 14, 1778] 1176
CCC to William Carmichael, Feb. 8, 1779 1178
CCA to CCC, Mar. 29, 1779 1182
CCC to CCA, Mar. 31, 177[9] 1183
CCA to CCC, Apr. 2, 1779 1187
CCC to CCA, Apr. 8, 1779 1188
CCC to CCA, Apr. 10, 1779 1189
CCC to CCA, Apr. 12, 1779 1190
CCA to CCC, Apr. 16, 1779 1191
CCC to CCA, Apr. 17, 1779 1193
CCA to CCC, Apr. 22, 1779 1195
Enclosure: CCA's Memorandum concerning the Weather, [Apr. 18, 1779] 1198
CCC to CCA, Apr. 24, 1779 1199
CCC to CCA, Apr. 25, 1779 1200
CCA to CCC, Apr. 28, 177[9] 1201
CCC to CCA, April 29, 1779 1202
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, May 2, 1779 1204
CCA to CCC, May 3, 1779 1205
CCA to CCC, May 7, 1779 1206
CCC to William Carmichael, May 7, 1779 1208
CCC to CCA, May 8, 1779 1209
CCC to CCA, [May 14, 1779] 1212
CCC to CCA, May [1]8, 1779 1213
CCA to CCC, May 21, 1779 1214
CCC to CCA, May 22, 1779 1215
CCA to CCC, May 23, 1779 1217
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, May 24, 1779 1218
CCC to CCA, May 24, 1779 1222
CCA to CCC, May 28, 1779 1223
CCC to William Carmichael, May 31, 1779 1224
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, June 21, 1779 1227
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, June 30, 1779 1230
William Carmichael to CCC, July 13, 1779 1232
CCA to William Fitzhugh, July 15, 1779 1233
CCA to CCC, July 15, 1779 1235
CCC to CCA, July 15, 1779 1237
CCA to CCC, July 21, 1779 1239
CCA to Pierre Penet, July 23, 1779 1241
CCC to CCA, July 24, 1779 1242
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, July 25, 1779 1248
CCA to Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer, July 30, 1779 1250
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Aug. 2, 1779 1251
CCA to CCC, Aug. 10, 1779 1253
CCC to CCA, Aug. 12, 1779 1255
Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer to CCA, Aug. 12, 1779 1257
Enclosure 1 A Copy of Samuel Chase's Letter to John Dorsey, [May, 4, 1779] 1258
Enclosure 2 A Copy of Robert Lemmon's Letter to Col. William Fitzhugh, Aug. 6, 1779 1260
CCA to CCC, Aug. 17, 1779 1261
CCC to CCA, Aug. 19, 1779 1265
CCA to CCC, Aug. 27, 1779 1266
Enclosure: CCA's List of Cash Sent to CCC at Bath, [Aug. 27, 1779] 1268
CCC to William Carmichael, Sept. 28, 1779 1268
CCC to CCA, Oct. 18, 1779 1274
CCA to CCC, Oct. 21, 1779 1275
CCC to CCA, Oct. 22, 1779 1277
CCC to CCA, Oct. 23, 1779 1279
CCA to CCC, Oct. 24, 1779 1280
CCC to CCA, Oct. 25, 1779 1281
CCC to CCA, Oct. 26, 1779 1283
Enclosure: A Copy of a Sheriff's Account, [October 1779] 1286
CCA to CCC, Nov. 4, 1779 1286
CCC to CCA, Nov. 5, 1779 1288
CCC to CCA, Nov. 7, 177[9] 1291
CCC to Joshua Johnson, Nov. 7, 1779 1292
CCA to CCC, Nov. 9, 1779 1293
CCA to CCC, Nov. 19, 1779 1294
CCC to Joshua Johnson, Nov. 27, 1779 1296
CCA to CCC, Dec. 3, 1779 1296
CCC to CCA, Dec. 4, 1779 1298
CCC to Benjamin Franklin, Dec. 5, 1779 1301
CCC to Joshua Johnson, Dec. 7, 1779 1304
CCA to CCC, Dec. 8, 1779 1308
Chapter 8 Final Battles, 1780-1782 1310
CCC to CCA, Apr. 5, 1780 1312
CCC to CCA, Apr. 8, 1780 1313
CCA to CCC, Apr. 11, 1780 1315
CCA to CCC, Apr. 16, 1780 1318
CCC to CCA, Apr. 17, [1780] 1319
CCA to CCC, Apr. 21, 1780 1323
CCC to CCA, Apr. 21, 1780 1324
CCC to CCA, Apr. 29, 1780 1326
CCC to Joshua Johnson, May 1, 1780 1328
CCA to CCC, May 4, 1780 1329
CCC to CCA, May 6, 1780 1330
CCC to CCA, May 11, 1780 1332
CCA to CCC, May 12, 1780 1333
CCA to CCC, May 13, 1780 1334
CCC to CCA, May 27, 1780 1335
CCA to CCC, June 1, 1780 1338
CCA to CCC, June 6, 1780 1340
CCC to CCA, June 10, [1780] 1342
CCC to CCA, June 11, 1780 1344
CCA to CCC, June 13, 1780 1344
Enclosure: CCA's Addition to His Letter of June 13, 1780, June 14, [1780] 1345
CCC to CCA, June 15, 1780 1346
Enclosure: A Clause from "An Act to procure a loan," [June 1780] 1347
CCA to CCC, June 19, 1780 1348
A Last Will and Testament of CCA, June 19, 1780 1348
CCA to CCC, June 23, 1780 1350
CCC to CCA, June 23, 1780 1351
CCC to CCA, June 24, 1780 1352
CCC to CCA, June 25, 1780 1353
CCA to CCC, June 25, 1780 1354
CCC to CCA, June 27, 1780 1354
CCA to CCC, June 30, 1780 1355
CCC to Joshua Johnson, July 22, 1780 1356
CCC to William Carmichael, Aug. 9, 1780 1357
CCC to John Hanson, [Aug. 15, 1780] 1363
Daniel Carroll to CCC, Aug. 26, 1780 1366
Daniel Carroll to CCC, Sept. 8, 1780 1369
Daniel Carroll to CCC, Sept. 10, 1780 1371
John Hanson to CCC, Sept. 11, 1780 1374
John Hanson to CCC, Sept. 18, 1780 1377
John Hanson to CCC, Oct. 16, 1780 1378
CCA to CCC, Oct. 22, 1780 1380
Molly Carroll to CCC, [Oct. 22, 1780] 1381
CCA to CCC, Oct. 26, 1780 1382
John Hanson to CCC, Oct. 30, 1780 1383
CCC to CCA, Nov. 28, 1780 1387
CCA to CCC, Nov. 29, 1780 1390
CCA to CCC, Dec. 9, 1780 1391
CCA to CCC, Dec. 17, 1780 1392
CCA to CCC, Jan. 1, 1781 1394
CCC to Joshua Johnson, Jan. 5, 1781 1395
CCA to CCC, Jan. 6, 1781 1396
CCA to CCC, Jan. 7, 1781 1397
CCA to CCC, Jan. 13, 1781 1397
CCA to CCC, Jan. 21, 1781 1399
CCA to CCC, Jan. 30, 1781 1401
CCA to CCC, Mar. 22, 1781 1402
CCA to CCC, Mar. 27, 1781 1403
Enclosure 1: Rhisa Todd to CCA, Mar. 24, 1781 1404
Enclosure 2: Rhisa Todd to CCA, Mar. 24, 1781 1405
CCA to CCC, Mar. 27, [1781] 1405
CCA to CCC, Mar. 30, 1781 1406
CCC to CCA, Mar. 31, 1781 1408
CCA to CCC, Apr. 3, 1781 1409
CCC to CCA, Apr. 5, 1781 1411
CCA to CCC, Apr. 10, 1781 1412
CCC to CCA, Apr. 11, 1781 1415
CCC to CCA, [Apr.] 12, [1781] 1418
CCA to CCC, Apr. 13, 1781 1419
CCC to CCA, Apr. 15, 1781 1419
CCA to CCC, Apr. 18, 1781 1421
Enclosure: CCA's List of Classes in Anne Arundel County, [1781] 1422
CCC to CCA, May 2, 1781 1422
CCA to CCC, May 4, 1781 1426
CCC to CCA, May 5, 1781 1427
CCA to CCC, May 7, 1781 1427
CCC to CCA, May 12, 1781 1429
CCA to CCC, May 13, 1781 1431
CCC to CCA, May 21, 1781 1432
CCA to CCC, May 22, 1781 1434
CCC to CCA, May 24, 1781 1435
CCA to CCC, May 29, 1781 1439
CCC to CCA, June 1, 1781 1440
CCC to CCA, June 4, 1781 1442
CCA to CCC, June 4, 1781 1445
CCA to CCC, June 9, 1781 1446
CCA to CCC, June 14, 1781 1447
CCA to CCC, June 16, 1781 1448
CCC to CCA, June 16, 1781 1448
Samuel Chase to the Maryland Gazette, [June 21, 1781] 1449
CCA to CCC, June 22, 1781 1457
CCC to CCA, June 22, 1781 1457
CCC to Thomas Sim Lee, Aug. 4, 1781 1461
CCC to Thomas Sim Lee, Aug. 5, 1781 1463
CCC to Thomas Sim Lee, Aug. 11, 1781 1463
CCC to Thomas Sim Lee, Aug. 18, 1781 1466
CCC to Samuel Chase, [Aug. 23, 1781] 1467
Samuel Chase to the Maryland Gazette, [Aug. 23, 1781] 1474
CCC to Thomas Sim Lee, Aug. 26, 1781 1475
A Poem by Richard Croxall, [1781] 1476
CCC to Samuel Chase, [Aug. 30, 1781] 1477
CCC to CCA, Oct. 15, 1781 1481
CCC to CCA, Oct. 18, 1781 1483
CCC to CCA, Oct. 18, 1781 1484
CCA to CCC, Oct. 19, 1781 1486
CCC to CCA, Oct. 20, 1781 1487
CCA to CCC, Oct. 23, 1781 1489
CCC to CCA, Oct. 25, 1781 1489
CCA to CCC, Oct. 30, 1781 1491
CCA to CCC, Nov. 7, 1781 1494
CCA to CCC, Nov. 9, 1781 1495
CCA to CCC, Nov. 10, 1781 1496
CCC to Wallace, Johnson, and Muir, Dec. 12, 1781 1497
CCC to Samuel Chase, Jan. 25, 1782 1498
Samuel Chase to CCC, Jan. 28, 1782 1501
CCC to Samuel Chase, Feb. 3, 1782 1508
Samuel Chase to CCC, Feb. 11, 1782 1513
CCC to Samuel Chase, Feb. 15, 1782 1517
Anonymous to CCC, Feb. 20, 1782 1517
CCC to Wallace, Johnson, and Muir, Feb. 21, 1782 1518
Samuel Chase to CCC, Feb. 23, 1782 1519
CCC to the Maryland Gazette, Feb. 25, 1782 1519
CCA to CCC, Mar. 24, 1782 1520
Enclosure: CCA's Instructions to Daniel Mackenzie, Mar. 23, 1782 1521
CCC to Wallace, Johnson, and Muir, Apr. 18, 1782 1522
CCC to Wallace, Johnson, and Muir, May 11, 1782 1523
CCC to William Russell, June 3, 1782 1524
Certifications of the Will of CCA, June 5, 1782 1525
CCC to Wallace, Johnson, and Muir, July 9, 1782 1526
Appendix I Genealogical Charts 1529
Chart A Irish Ancestry of the Carrolls 1530
Chart B Descendants of Anthony Carroll of Lisheenboy 1532
Chart C Descendants of Charles Carroll of Annapolis 1534
Chart D Descendants of Daniel Carroll of Duddington 1536
Chart E Brooke Descendants of Elinor Hatton 1538
Chart F Darnall Descendants of Elinor Hatton 1540
Chart G Kin Networks: Brooke, Carroll, and Darnall 1542
Chart H Kin Networks: Calvert, Carroll, Darnall, Sewall, and Tilghman 1544
Chart I Kin Networks: Carroll, Digges 1546
Chart J Descendants of Daniel Carroll I of Upper Marlboro 1548
Chart K Dr. Charles Carroll's Line 1550
Select Bibliography for Genealogical Tables 1551
Appendix II Carroll Book Lists 1553
A List of French Books 1553
A List of Books 1556
Law Books remaining by me 1558
A List of Eng: Books 1559
Books Chosen by Charles Carroll of Carrollton 1564
Miscellaneous List of Books 1569
Appendix III Slave Inventories 1571
A List of Negroes--on Doohoregan Manor taken in Familys with their Ages Decr. 1. 1773 1571
List of Negroes on Poplar Island taken 18th Feby. 1774 1583
List of Negroes--House-Servants at Annapolis--taken the 4 July 1774 1583
List of negroes at Annapolis Quarter taken 11 July 1774 1584
A List of Negroes at Annapolis Quarter taken the 4th. day of February 1779 1585
A list of negroes assessed in Annapolis 1781 1585
1782 Febry A list of house Servants & their children delivered to the Assessor in Annapolis 1586
Index 1587
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