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Dear Papa, Dear Hotch: The Correspondence of Ernest Hemingway and A. E. Hotchner
     

Dear Papa, Dear Hotch: The Correspondence of Ernest Hemingway and A. E. Hotchner

by Albert J. DeFazio III (Editor), A. E. Hotchner (Preface by)
 

Dear Papa, Dear Hotch presents for the first time the collected correspondence between literary giant Ernest Hemingway and his young friend and informal agent A. E. Hotchner. Hotchner, author of the well-known memoir Papa Hemingway, served as the authorized adapter of Hemingway’s stories for the stage, movies, and television. Spanning the final

Overview

Dear Papa, Dear Hotch presents for the first time the collected correspondence between literary giant Ernest Hemingway and his young friend and informal agent A. E. Hotchner. Hotchner, author of the well-known memoir Papa Hemingway, served as the authorized adapter of Hemingway’s stories for the stage, movies, and television. Spanning the final quarter of Hemingway’s life from 1948 to 1961, the book includes more than 160 letters, cables, and cards between these two close friends.  
            The correspondence begins following their initial meeting in Cuba and ends after their final encounter at the Mayo Clinic, where Hemingway was a patient. In the years between, they hunt game in Idaho and visit Hemingway’s old haunts on an automobile trip through Italy and France. In Spain, Hotchner attends his first bullfight and, with Hemingway as his manager, enters the ring himself as a matador under the sobriquet El Pecas (The Freckled One). Revealing Hemingway’s preoccupation with his physical condition, the collection closes with sobering glimpses into the psychological turmoil that eventually led to his suicide in 1961.
            DeFazio presents the letters in a chronological “clear-text” format, in which only the author’s final intention is transcribed within the body of the edition. All cancellations, alterations, and corrections are listed at the back of the book in a textual commentary that will enable readers to reconstruct most of the features of the original manuscripts and envelopes. DeFazio also includes annotations following each letter. This exciting collection of letters between two extremely lively and interesting characters will provide much valuable information about Hemingway’s late career.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“This is an important exchange of correspondence between an undeniably major contemporary American literary figure and someone with whom he had a close personal and professional relationship during the last thirteen years of his life. . . . Having both sides of the correspondence available vastly increases the value of the book—because one can see how they responded to and interacted with one another. This book will provide an important insight into the last decade of Hemingway’s life.”—Jackson R. Bryer, coeditor of French Connections: Hemingway and Fitzgerald Abroad

Looking back on the years since [Hemingway’s] death, those years that have passed without him, I’d say that the most resounding thing I learned from him was this: Don’t fear failure, and don’t overestimate success. It was a tenet he lived by and a legacy I treasure. . . . His was a deep, abiding friendship, like no other in my life. Rereading these letters, after all these years, fills me with sadness, exultation, and the realization that an extraordinary man infiltrated my life with wisdom, love, fortitude, and an indomitable spirit that I now gladly share with others.—From the Preface by A. E. Hotchner             

Library Journal
This collection of correspondence between Hemingway and his biographer Hotchner (Papa Hemingway) includes 161 letters, cables, and cards that span from their first meeting in 1948 to Hemingway's death in 1961. Hotchner often served Hemingway as a literary agent and worked closely with him on adapting his work for television and film. As such, much of the correspondence is taken up with business matters, although reports on Hemingway's health, word counts on ongoing writing projects, and allusions to contemporary sports events-particularly baseball, boxing, and bullfighting-are also included. Some of the letters, however, deal with more personal material, such as how Hemingway liked to work caged tigers with a rolled newspaper or how he nursed his son Patrick through a difficult illness and dark time. Editor DeFazio (Literary Masterpieces: The Sun Also Rises) provides clear and unobtrusive notes that should be useful to students of Hemingway's life and work. Recommended for research level collections in American literature.-William Gargan, Brooklyn Coll. Lib., CUNY. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826216052
Publisher:
University of Missouri Press
Publication date:
12/28/2005
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

About the Editor
Albert J. DeFazio III is an English instructor at George Mason High School in the city of Falls Church and George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. He is the author of Literary Masterpieces: The Sun Also Rises inthe Gale Study Guides to Great Literature series.

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