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Dear Tabby
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Dear Tabby

by Carolyn Crimi, David Roberts (Illustrator)
 

Got Troubles?

Trying to kick the catnip habit?

Itching to ditch those pesky fleas?

Sick of the same old "fetch, roll over, stay" routine?

Tabby D. Cat can help!

Tabby D. Cat, longtime alley resident, has been help-ing the furry and feathered creatures of Critterville for all nine of her lives. From hamsters to hounds, Tabby

Overview

Got Troubles?

Trying to kick the catnip habit?

Itching to ditch those pesky fleas?

Sick of the same old "fetch, roll over, stay" routine?

Tabby D. Cat can help!

Tabby D. Cat, longtime alley resident, has been help-ing the furry and feathered creatures of Critterville for all nine of her lives. From hamsters to hounds, Tabby's advice column has just the right advice for any pet . . . but can Tabby find happiness for herself?

From Carolyn Crimi and David Roberts comes this hilarious and heartwarming tale of finicky felines, happiness-seeking hounds, and finding your own place to call home.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Letters, handbills, and newspaper articles tell the story of advice columnist Tabby D. Cat and her career fixing up the lives of her fellow animals. Crimi's (Where's My Mummy?) plotting skills are solid and her language is suitably hip ("Take deep, cleansing breaths, my frazzled friend"), while perpetually affronted-looking characters lounge among stylish accessories. Along the way, Tabby (who signs herself "Purrfectly yours") successfully returns a bear to her circus, polishes the social skills of a too-talkative parrot, and finds a spouse for a skunk—and for a grand finale, she finds herself an owner and a home. When a cat named Boots objects to the pampering her owner, Emily, subjects her to ("She rolls me around town like I'm some kind of doll"), Tabby leaps at the opportunity, telling Boots it's fine to move on ("Go, my freedom-loving friend") and planting herself on Emily's stoop with a note ("Dear Emily, Please take care of this cat. She is clean and kind and will listen to all your troubles"). Diverting, lighthearted entertainment. Ages 4�8. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Carlee Hallman
Mimicking the "Dear Abby" advice columnist, Tabby the cat answers mail from other animals. Boots, the cat, complains because she is served sardines. Tabby tells Boots that most cats enjoy sardines. To answer a lonely skunk, Tabby suggests he use cologne. Betty Bear has run away from the circus and is scared in the dark. She tells Tabby not to show her letter to her brother, which is exactly what Tabby does so that Betty can be found. Boots again writes to complain about having to wear a sweater. Tabby says she should be thankful. Advice is given to a dog, a talking parrot, and a groundhog. When Boots decides to run away, Tabby is happy to take her place. The pages show letters from the animals with return addresses on them. Large blue print is used for Tabby's advice. The colored cartoon-like pictures are humorous. Adults may want to explain the many cliches such as those in the letter to a hamster: "Think outside the circle! Get off that wheel before your world spins out of control!" Reviewer: Carlee Hallman
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—From her Dumpster on Straye Street Alley, Tabby D. Cat dispenses advice and wisdom to the troubled animals of Critterville. From Boots Whitepaw, who is being smothered with affection by an indulgent child owner, to Betty Bear, who has left the Dingaling Sisters' Traveling Circus after a spat with her brother, Tabby tries to guide her correspondents in their search for happiness. This epistolary picture book is attractive and easy to read, sometimes presenting the writers of the letters in the illustrations, and sometimes showing Tabby as she formulates her responses. Tabby follows her own advice, and her well-being is orchestrated through machinations and common sense, as she shines a light on how a person (or parrot, or skunk, or cat) can make her own happiness. It is a positive message, although the way it comes about might surprise some readers. This book is well suited for one-on-one sharing, with plenty of opportunity for trying on different voices. It would also serve as a fun recommendation for reluctant early elementary readers who still prefer picture books to chapter books.—Kara Schaff Dean, Walpole Public Library, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061142451
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/08/2011
Pages:
30
Sales rank:
862,353
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD820L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Carolyn Crimi is the author of numerous picture books, including Boris and Bella, Where's My Mummy?, and Don't Need Friends. She was born and raised on Long Island, New York, and now lives in Illinois with her husband and pug.

David Roberts is the illustrator of A House Called Awful End and the other books in the popular Eddie Dickens Trilogy, as well as the picture books Rapunzel: A Groovy Fairy Tale and the Charlotte Zolotow Honor Book Mrs. Crump's Cat. He is also the author-illustrator of the picture book Dirty Bertie. David was runner-up for the prestigious Mother Goose Award for children's illustration. He lives in London, England.

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