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Dear Tooth Fairy
     

Dear Tooth Fairy

5.0 1
by Pamela Duncan Edwards, Marie-louise Fitzpatrick (Illustrator), Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick (Illustrator)
 

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Dear Tooth Fairy,

Last week it was my birthday. I was six, but I don't have even one wobbly tooth yet. I'm worried.

Yours sincerely,

Claire

Claire is anxiously awaiting her first loose tooth, and she's getting impatient. She writes to the Tooth Fairy, and miraculously, the Tooth Fairy writes back -- providing Claire with some

Overview

Dear Tooth Fairy,

Last week it was my birthday. I was six, but I don't have even one wobbly tooth yet. I'm worried.

Yours sincerely,

Claire

Claire is anxiously awaiting her first loose tooth, and she's getting impatient. She writes to the Tooth Fairy, and miraculously, the Tooth Fairy writes back -- providing Claire with some helpful advice!

In a delightful exchange of letters between a young girl and the Tooth Fairy, Pamela Duncan Edwards and Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick convey the excited anticipation every young child experiences while waiting for the monumental event of losing that first wobbly tooth.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The correspondents in this appealing epistolary tale are Claire, newly six, and the eponymous diva of dentition herself- although older readers may suspect that the latter is actually Claire's grandma. Claire's letters, which serve as the main text, start out lamenting her inability to shed even one baby tooth-which is particularly galling because Jimmy Clarke has two wobbly ones. Interspersed with scenes from Claire's busy life (school, Halloween, a birthday party, visits with Grandma), the Tooth Fairy's typewritten responses appear on fairy-emblazoned stationery, offering consolation, encouragement and genial dental hygiene reminders: "I know it's hard to believe, but I have people on my list who are almost seven, and they still don't have wobbly teeth.... I hope you are brushing them twice a day, because I really like to collect shiny white teeth." Although a popular subject, this tooth fairy outing seems fresh and sunny, thanks in part to the successful pairing of Fitzpatrick (Lizzy and Skunk) and Edwards (Some Smug Slug). Softly lit watercolors, firmly grounded in everyday life, make an effective visual and narrative counterpoint to the letters' vivacity and flights of fancy. A lifelike, upbeat ending should earn grins-gap-toothed and otherwise-of approval. Ages 4-7. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The excitement and anticipation of losing the first tooth is brought vividly and humorously to life in this exchange of letters between young Claire and the Tooth Fairy. Claire and her friend Amanda are worried because they don't even have any wobbly ones. But after a visit to grandma, who tells them to be patient, the Tooth Fairy herself writes to assure them that they are on her list. Of course, as life goes on with parties and Halloween, a tooth finally begins to wobble, all teeth are carefully brushed in preparation, and tooth boxes are prepared for the big occasion. Claire is happy after receiving her money, but already anxious about her "next wobbly tooth." Fitzpatrick's delicate watercolors honestly convey the vibrancy of real six-year-olds. Claire is truly a charmer, while the settings of school and home, including the tooth-brushing, add to the attractive normality of the story. We can almost believe in the delightful fairy with multiple wings and many-colored dresses writing the letters. The end papers offer stamps with imaginative insights into fairy life. 2003, Katherine Tegen Books/HarperCollins Publishers, Ages 4 to 7.
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Worried that she still hasn't had one loose tooth, six-year-old Claire writes numerous letters to the Tooth Fairy, who responds with the advice to be patient and to keep brushing. When the big event finally does happen, the Tooth Fairy leaves a note promising to use her newest acquisition for her "special fairy carriage." Claire's letters are balanced by colorful watercolor paintings showing the girl interacting with her family and friends. The Tooth Fairy's typewritten responses are decorated with dreamy images of the sprite in a variety of poses. The endpapers contain postage stamps from "Elfin-Glades" that feature amusing pictures (e.g., a toothbrush and toothpaste, an apple with a bite taken out of it, and the Tooth Fairy carrying a large bicuspid). This charming picture book may inspire young readers to write letters of their own.-Sandra Kitain, Abrams Hebrew Academy, Yardley, PA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this wry epistolary tale, a precocious six-year-old petitions the tooth fairy regarding the status of her first loose tooth. In a flurry of letters, Claire quizzes the tooth fairy as to why she, at the ripe age of six years and one week, doesn't have a wiggly tooth. The tooth fairy's wise responses soothe Claire's worries. Through Claire's missives, Duncan winningly captures that fragile stage when small children eagerly await the milestones that promote them to big-kid status. Along the way, Claire and her friends learn about good oral hygiene-brush twice a day-and a smidge about tolerance, e.g., be happy for, rather than jealous of, others' accomplishments-in this case, Jimmy Clarke and his two loose teeth. Fitzpatrick's watercolor illustrations are a tranquil blend of mellow hues. The tooth fairy's letters overlay the illustrations, gently drifting across the pages, and printed on appropriately fey stationary. The cumulative effect of images and text is a winsome and heartening tale for little ones awaiting the loss of their first tooth. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780066239729
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/14/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Pamela Duncan Edwards is the author of numerous popular picture books, including Livingstone Mouse; Roar! A Noisy Counting Book; Some Smug Slug; The Worrywarts; Clara Caterpillar; Wake-Up Kisses; Rosie's Roses; The Leprechaun's Gold; and Gigi and Lulu's Gigantic Fight, all illustrated by Henry Cole; as well as Dear Tooth Fairy, illustrated by Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick; McGillycuddy Could!, illustrated by Sue Porter; and The Neat Line, illustrated by Diana Cain Bluthenthal. She lives in Virginia.

Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick is the author and illustrator of Lizzy and Skunk; I'm a Tiger Too; You, Me and the Big Blue Sea; and The Long March: She lives in Ireland.

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Dear Tooth Fairy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a cute story! There are many lessons to be learned underneath the cute words and the enchanting illustrations. Besides addressing the anxiety of a six-year-old for not having any wobbly tooth, this tale talks to friendship (Claire and Amanda's), respect the words of elders and celebrate other's fortune (Claire listens to her Grandma, be glad for Jimmy Clark's wobbly teeth, and subsequently invites him to a party). Lastly, I like how the clever story illuminates a fairy tale for children of any racial makeup to enjoy, even Tooth Fairy is not known universally.