Dear Vampa by Ross Collins, NOOK Book (NOOK Kids eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Dear Vampa

Dear Vampa

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by Ross Collins
     
 

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The Pires are cursed with new neighbors. Things were just fine on Nostfer Avenue until the Wolfsons arrived. There seems to be no end to the new family's strange rituals. They stay up all day long, lock their windows at night, and bathe—in sunshine. What's a nice vampire family to do?

Ross Collins has created an ironic, laugh-out-loud story that invites

Overview

The Pires are cursed with new neighbors. Things were just fine on Nostfer Avenue until the Wolfsons arrived. There seems to be no end to the new family's strange rituals. They stay up all day long, lock their windows at night, and bathe—in sunshine. What's a nice vampire family to do?

Ross Collins has created an ironic, laugh-out-loud story that invites you to think about accepting others—perhaps your neighbors are less different than you think.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Writing to his grandfather back in Transylvania, boy vampire Bram Pire pens a litany of Addams family-style complaints about the new neighbors, e.g., "The Wolfsons stay up all day long. We haven't had any sleep in weeks." The Wolfsons are as healthy and sun-kissed as the Pires are pale and dark-the Pires are drawn in black, white and red, while the Wolfsons are shown in full color, even when the families appear together. Collins's (Medusa Jones) black, angular vampires lace the comedy with a drop of real creepiness. The indignities continue to pile up, but when the Wolfsons shoot down their neighbors with slingshots when they fly out of their house in bat form, it's too much: "Mom asks if you can get the guest crypt ready for us," Bram writes. Collins tucks in plenty of subtle references for parental enjoyment, and young vampire fans will enjoy (and perhaps be secretly relieved by) the vampires' beleaguered state. Ages 3-8. (Sept.)

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Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
Bram Pire writes to his vampa in Transylvania to let him know of the problems in the neighborhood. It seems that an undesirable family has moved in next door. They actually stay up all day making noise which means that Bram and his family never have enough peace and quiet to get some sleep. The Wolfson's moved in about three months ago and their enjoyment of sunshine is bizarre and Bram's mom thinks it is disgusting. Much of the humor is shown in the illustrations. When Bram complains about their unpleasant pet, the illustration shows a normal looking dog while Bram and his family have a creature resembling a huge red octopus. Now Bram writes to tell Vampa that the family is packing to move to Transylvania because when he and his family went out for a flutter, the Wolfsons shot at them. The Wolfsons are depicted as normal folks shooting at vicious looking bats. This amusing story ends with a twist and is fun to read. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—The majority of this tale is written in the form of a letter from Bram Pire to his "Vampa." The Pire family, with their pointed fingers, pointed ears, and fangs, is planning to move back to Transylvania to stay in Vampa's "guest crypt" for a while as they are most unhappy with their new neighbors. The house next door was bought by some unusual and vividly colorful folks: they enjoy sunshine, stay up all day, and sleep all night with their windows locked up tight. When the Pires take off for "an evening flutter" in the form of bats, the Wolfsons (hint, hint) shoot them down with slingshots. Enough is enough, and the Pires, depicted only in black and white with touches of red, pack up their things. A spread shows some of the belongings they are taking: a skull safely covered in bubble wrap, a caged vulture, a plaque reading "Tomb, Sweet Tomb," a book entitled Good Neck Guide, and a coffin. As the moving van drives off in the light of a full moon, something very strange begins happening to the Wolfsons. Good fun for vampire fans.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
In a letter to his Transylvanian grandfather young Bram Pire tallies complaints against his new next-door neighbors the Wolfsons: They stay up and make noise all day. They sit out in the sunlight. They lock their windows at night (very inconsiderate). They have strange ideas about Halloween costumes. There's nothing for it but to move back to Transylvania. In contrast to the busy, exuberant, brightly colored Wolfson family in Collins' rapidly sketched cartoon scenes, the black-and-white Pires stand about in pointy-eared bewilderment. The author saves a twist for the end, having the Wolfsons undergo a sudden transformation (hint: check their name) as they watch the Pires huffily depart. Patricia Polacco's The Graves Family (2003) would doubtless have made more resilient neighbors. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062183859
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/15/2011
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
14 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Ross Collins is not a vampire but has aspirations to be one. He likes to dress in black and drink tomato juice, but the police have advised him to stop there. He is the author and illustrator of many books for children, including Medusa Jones, Busy Night, and Germs. He lurks in a haunted castle in Scotland.

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Dear Vampa 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
FARIEQUEENE More than 1 year ago
What an adorably cute book for any Halloween Storytime, I laughed and laughed, especially at all the literary jokes inside the book. I could read it a million times!