Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

by Howard Williams
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521840198

ISBN-13: 9780521840194

Pub. Date: 09/30/2006

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400–1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological

Overview

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400–1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521840194
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
09/30/2006
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Archaeology Series
Pages:
268
Product dimensions:
6.85(w) x 9.72(h) x 0.83(d)

Table of Contents

List of figures; Preface; 1. Death, memory and material culture; 2. Objects of memory; 3. Remembering through the body; 4. Graves as mnemonic compositions; 5. Monuments and memory; 6. Death and landscape; 7. Remembering, forgetting and the mortuary context; references; Index.

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