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Death in Disguise (Chief Inspector Barnaby Series #3)
     

Death in Disguise (Chief Inspector Barnaby Series #3)

4.0 1
by Caroline Graham
 

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The Lodge of the Golden Windhorse has provided the citizens of Compton Dando with splendid fodder for gossip, prompting speculation of arcane rituals and bizarre sexual practices. But with the murder of the commune's leaders, the rumor-mill goes into overdrive. In trying to solve those murders, Chief Inspector Barnaby is less excited than exasperated. The residents

Overview

The Lodge of the Golden Windhorse has provided the citizens of Compton Dando with splendid fodder for gossip, prompting speculation of arcane rituals and bizarre sexual practices. But with the murder of the commune's leaders, the rumor-mill goes into overdrive. In trying to solve those murders, Chief Inspector Barnaby is less excited than exasperated. The residents of the Windhorse commune may have been seeking the simple life, but they're all concealing complicated pasts-or past lives. As in Death of a Hollow Man, Graham is at her most gleeful when skewering the eccentricities of a closed community, and no one survives unscathed.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Murder in a country manor inhabited by a cult of mystics tests the patience and skills of Detective Chief Inspector Tom Barnaby, last seen in Murder at Madingley Grange . After the death of cult member Jim Carter is ruled an accident, various residents of the Lodge of the Golden Windhorse in the English village of Compton Dando go about their normal lives--communing with the spirits, astral-planing to the planet Venus, holding ``psychic weekends.'' One event looms, however: a scheduled visit by financier Guy Gamelin, a ruthless robber-baron and father of cult member and heiress Suhami, known as Sylvie Gamelin in her earlier life. Following Gamelin's unsuccessful attempt to reconcile with Suhami, the Master of the lodge is killed by a knife thrown during a psychic regression by one of the cultists. Barnaby's investigation uncovers a variety of suspects and discrepancies: Suhami accuses her father; several of the residents, including the Master, prove to be other than they claim; a retarded boy holds important information but cannot speak about it. Graham's competent procedural works most effectively as a wickedly acid yet sympathetic portrayal of a group of society's misfits seeking comfort and a place in the world. (June)
Library Journal
The ``Chief Inspector Barnaby'' series continues as Barnaby and partner Troy investigate murder in a small English commune. The usual witty prose and peculiar characters apply.
Kirkus Reviews
A third ramble through the village for Chief Inspector Barnaby and Sergeant Troy (Murder at Madingley Grange, 1991; Death of a Hollow Man, 1989) giddily blends homage and satire in the goings-on at the Manor House in Compton Dando, where a wacko bunch of spiritualists/charlatans/disciples have taken up residence. An accidental fall kills off monkish Jim Carter and, months later, while Suhami's millionaire estranged dad Guy Gamelin and addicted mom Felicity are visiting, the Master himself is skewered with a kitchen knife during May's past-lives regression. Are the murders connected? Do they tie in with Suhami's birthday wish to cede her trust fund to the Master's plan—and his refusal of it? For Barnaby and Troy, sorting through interviews with healers, channelers, and their attendant mumbo-jumbo is not easy—nor is learning their pre- enlightenment felony-conviction surnames—and there will be a fatal heart seizure and a lethal poke with a crowbar before all the ends tie up and the angels guarding the signs of the zodiac, as well as the requirements of the vintage mystery, are so gloriously appeased. Wonderfully funny, with such solid, traditional underpinnings as good plotting, judiciously dropped clues, and a luminescent turn of phrase: a likely-to-be New Age classic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933397696
Publisher:
Felony & Mayhem, LLC
Publication date:
04/28/2007
Series:
Chief Inspector Barnaby Series , #3
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
173,494
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 7.66(h) x 0.81(d)

Meet the Author

CAROLINE GRAHAM was born in Warwickshire, England. Her first Inspector Barnaby novel, The Killings at Badger's Drift, was selected as one of the Top 100 Crime Novels of All Time by the Crime Writers' Association.

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Death in Disguise (Chief Inspector Barnaby Series #3) 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a bit of a letdown from previous books in the series. I settled on 3 stars as a rating, but I have a feeling I'll be coming back to this later in the week and re-rating it at 2.5 stars. First off, the editing in this book was atrocious. There were periods in place of commas, numerous instances of ‘is’ used in place of ‘in’, and the word sterilizer was spelled with an 's' and a 'z' in the same paragraph. I guess the editor couldn't decide on the UK spelling or the American spelling, so they decided to go with both and hoped nobody would notice. One of the suspects is referred to as both Sylvie and Sylvia throughout the book – according to Google it’s supposed to be Sylvie. What irritated me the most however, were the sections of font that randomly changed size half-way through a sentence and then changed back a paragraph later, once again half-way through a sentence. Needless to say, all these issues kept me from fully immersing myself in the story. Just like the previous book in the series, Death of a Hollow Man, it takes almost half the book to really get started. The long set-up made sense in the previous novel because Inspector Barnaby was supposed to be familiar with all of the suspects, but it didn't work in this book. The book felt heavily padded and drawn out. Furthermore, once the mystery gets started, instead of focusing on the investigation the author made the decision to continue focusing on the lives of the suspects. I wanted to read a mystery not a soap opera. Another puzzling decision made by the author was to spend more time with Sergeant Troy's POV. In the first two books he was almost there as a background character, with an occasional peek into his head. I mentioned in a previous review how every moment with his POV is extremely uncomfortable, so I'm a little confused as to why the author chose to write more of this novel from his perspective. Sergeant Troy is best used in small doses and it felt overdone. I really wasn't impressed with this book overall. Though I've only read three books in this series, I have to say this is by far the worse. The author made a number of decisions in the narrative that left me scratching my head, including adding an Epilogue at the end that summarized the suspect’s lives after the murderer was brought to justice. Over 300 pages of these characters apparently wasn’t enough. The mystery itself was an afterthought and based off the flimsy evidence that Inspector Barnaby was able to collect, there was no way he should have been able to get a conviction. Huh? I actually made it to the end of this review before changing my mind. 2 ½ stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago