Death Is Hard to Live With: Teenagers Talk about How They Cope with Loss

Death Is Hard to Live With: Teenagers Talk about How They Cope with Loss

by Janet Bode, Stan Mack
     
 

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I just graduated from high school I feel we had a curse on my class. Six people died. The worst was Shannon, my best friend. She was free-spirited, the last person you'd expect to die. One day she's great. The next day she's dead. I wasn't prepared for it. — Leticia, age 17

Death Is Hard To Live With

Through interviews with teenagers who have experienced the

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Overview

I just graduated from high school I feel we had a curse on my class. Six people died. The worst was Shannon, my best friend. She was free-spirited, the last person you'd expect to die. One day she's great. The next day she's dead. I wasn't prepared for it. — Leticia, age 17

Death Is Hard To Live With

Through interviews with teenagers who have experienced the death of a friend or relative, Janet Bode explores ways of making peace with the shock, guilt, and tragedy of death. Young adults who feel defeated can learn through these examples and, by reading what worked tor their peers, discover that they, too, can find a way to cope.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This guide for teenagers coping with death and loss, featuring first-person narratives and newspaper excerpts, will ``evoke heartfelt responses,'' said PW. Ages 12-up. (Jan.)q
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
This book collects writings by teenagers who talk about how they cope with loss. It also includes supportive suggestions by professionals.
Stephanie Zvirin
Bode, a veteran nonfiction author whose books frequently focus on teenage trauma, has long recognized the attraction of the personal interview when it comes to presenting sensitive subjects to young adults. Her latest book recognizes something else as well--the appeal of brevity in the delivery of information. The combination should make her wrenchingly honest, informative look at death more approachable. But it's not quite that simple. In content, the book is a sweeping exploration of death that tackles the subject from both the cultural and the emotional perspective. Viewpoints of therapists and representatives from religious communities, as well as insights from specialists (a forensic expert, a funeral director, and so on), entwine with teenagers' moving personal stories. Bode covers familiar territory--changes in family relationships and romantic notions about death, for example--but she also introduces some new issues, among them the idea of closure and autoerotic death among teenagers. The problem is the book's format. Unlike Grollman's recent "Straight Talk about Death" , which also depends on brevity to attract readers, Bode's book is very chaotic in appearance. Boldfaced headings break personal interviews into sometimes awkward chunks, and so many boxes are used to highlight information that it can be difficult to keep speakers straight: Is it Bode who's filling readers in on whom to go to when they're upset, or is it medical specialist Barbara Staggers? The book also contains reproductions of news articles and two comic strip stories (one of which delivers a bit of graveside humor). This "sound-byte" approach is tailor-made for today's video generation, and Bode is a thoughtful, sensitive writer and a good listener who knows kids' concerns. But the format of her book sometimes compromises its clarity, and that might turn kids off, especially when they're trying to make sense out of something that touches so many raw nerves.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385310413
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
08/01/1993
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.76(w) x 8.57(h) x 0.79(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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