Death of a Parent: Transition to a New Adult Identity

Overview

Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life. From Stone Age ideas about dying as otherworld journey to the contemporary Cosmopolitan Age of dying in nursing homes, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey of discovery that covers the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about ...
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Overview

Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life. From Stone Age ideas about dying as otherworld journey to the contemporary Cosmopolitan Age of dying in nursing homes, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey of discovery that covers the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about human dying conduct. The historical approach of this book places our recent images of cancer dying and medical care in broader historical, epidemiological and global context. Professor Kellehear argues that we are witnessing a rise in shameful forms of dying. It is not cancer, heart disease or medical science that presents modern dying conduct with its greatest moral tests, but rather poverty, ageing and social exclusion.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
According to the research model developed by Umberson (sociology, Univ. of Texas, Austin), loss of a parent at midlife is a predictable yet transformative experience. Umberson, who has published widely in the areas of family relationships and health, analyzes in serviceable prose how such a loss affects an adult child's physical and psychological health as well as his or her relationships with siblings, surviving parents, and children. Drawing on extensive research (sponsored by the National Institute on Aging) and interviews with a representative national sample of research respondents in 1986, 1989, and 1994, Umberson comes to some truly illuminating conclusions, shedding light on such issues as how a loss can negatively affect survivors or "liberate" them and improve their long-term health, depending on the social context, and why adult children become more like their parents after they die. She also includes coping strategies. This clear, insightful study provides a unique combination of research-based self-help and scholarly enterprise. Highly recommended for large public libraries and academic social science collections.-Antoinette Brinkman, M.L.S., Evansville, IN Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
"Umberson has mined a rich and largely untapped vein of universal human experience. She deftly presents these engaging voices in a context that will continue to inspire research and practice in this area."
Nancy Hall, Yale University

"Umberson comes to some truly illuminating conclusions.... This clear insightful study provides a unique combination of research-based self-help and scholarly enterprise. Highly recommended...."
--Library Journal

"Provides a welcome benchmark for future research on the impact of a parent's death on an adult child. It covers a wide range of topics, and thoughtfully considers implications of the findings....Should be of considerable interest to those who are doing research or are involved in clinical practice concerning dying, death, and bereavement."
--Death Studies

"A book to be taken seriously. With so much richness of ideas, such diversity of issues addressed, and based on so much data, this book is essential reading for anyone who researches or teaches about bereavement following the death of a parent. Furthermore, this will be a useful, perhaps even cherished book for many who struggle personally with the death of a parent."
--Journal of Social and Personal Relationships

"A very comprehensive review....Umberson has provided an interesting work which spans various concerns that adults, from varying backgrounds and ages, have experienced with the loss of a parent....impressive.... well organized....Umberson's research makes powerful statements that resonate with one's own experiences."
Journal of Marriage and Family

"This is an excellent, insightful volume that can be highly recommended. It is a much-needed addition to the literature, not least because everyone has to face the possibility of parental loss sooner or later; an eloquent account and some sound scientifically-derived knowledge may help readers through the maze of emotions associated with this distinctive type of loss."
--Contemporary Sociology

"In the 1980s researchers collected data in a US study that looked at adults’ thoughts, feelings and behaviours to do with the death of their parent. Author Debra Umberson was among the researchers on the team. Years later, she has crafted this solid book about transition to a new identity after the loss of a parent. It is a book that transcends gender and cultural borders. It is useful to clients, counsellors, researchers and educators dealing with death, dying, bereavement and adult development."
-- Robin Raniero Norris, Psychotherapist and counselor, MA, MFT

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521012966
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 10/30/2006
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 475,818
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

Debra Umberson is Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is an expert on intimate relationships and health. Using in-depth interviews and national surveys, she explains why the death of a parent has strong effects on adults, often for the worse, but sometimes for the better. She has written numerous articles on marriage and divorce, parent/child relationships, and how gender roles impact men's and women's health. She is currently writing a book about couples in long term relationships, highlighting the challenges of maintaining sexual and emotional intimacy over the life course.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Ordinary Loss, Extraordinary Change 5
2 Unexpected Crisis 15
3 Symbolic Loss 49
4 Turning Point in Adulthood 79
5 Intimate Relationships 105
6 The Next Generation 131
7 The Parent Left Behind 151
8 My Brother's Keeper 171
9 Rite of Passage 194
App Data and Methods 221
Notes 237
Index 249
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