Death Penalty Cases: Leading U.S. Supreme Court Cases on Capital Punishment / Edition 2

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Overview

Death Penalty Cases provides an unbiased collection of seminal death penalty cases in the United States. It offers full but carefully edited excerpts from 25 different US Supreme Court cases along with helpful introductory materials specially prepared by the editor. It also includes the latest statistical data on capital punishment [and a useful sampling of death penalty statutes]. Together, this material is invaluable for a full understanding of this fascinating subject.

Without taking sides on this controversial issue, the author illuminates the arguments and presents the cases that form the framework for US law on capital punishment. The keen selection of the material and the quality and extent of the commentary make this unique textbook a superb resource and an outstanding educational tool.

• Carefully edited excerpts from 25 landmark US Supreme Court cases
• Outstanding original interpretation and analysis from the author
• A wealth of impartial material on ethics and historical controversies

Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students in criminal justice, criminal law, issues, ethics, and civil rights courses. Has some potential as a primary text for courses in the death penalty and special topics courses. Strong potential in trade market for libraries and retail bookstores.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The volume remains a casebook in essential form and content. - The Law and Politics Book Review

...a compact and eminently useful collection... - The Law and Politics Book Review

...will find Latzer's second edition to be even handier and more useful than the first edition. - The Law and Politics Book Review

…a wonderful job of editing the most important Supreme Court decisions on the death penalty over the past 30 years. - CHOICE

A useful "editor's comment" on the case if offered for most of the cases. Very highly recommended for general collections. - CHOICE

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780750675949
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 11/29/2002
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 348
  • Product dimensions: 0.75 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 6.14 (d)

Meet the Author

BARRY LATZER is Professor of Government at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a member of the Ph.D. and M.A. faculties in Criminal Justice at the Graduate School and University Center. He received a law degree (J.D.) from Fordham University (1985) and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (1977). Professor Latzer is also known for his work on state constitutional law, which is the subject of two of his books, State Constitutional Criminal Law (Clark, Boardman, Callaghan, 1995), and State Constitutions and Criminal Justice (Greenwood, 1991). He has published over two dozen scholarly articles and writes a continuing series of articles for the Criminal Law Bulletin, entitled "State Constitutional Developments."

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
Ch. 1 Capital Punishment: The Law and the Issues
Ch. 2 Cruel and Unusual as Applied — Furman V. Georgia (1972)
Ch. 3 Not Inherently Unconstitutional — Gregg v. Georgia (1976)
Ch. 4 Texas Death Penalty Procedures — Jurek v. Texas (1976)
Ch. 5 Rape and the Death Penalty—Coker v. Georgia (1977)
Ch. 6 Mandatory Death Penalty—Woodson v. North Carolina (1976)
Ch. 7 "Mandatory" Death Statutes — Blystone v. Pennsylvania (1990)
Ch. 8 Vague Aggravating Factors — Godfrey v. Georgia (1980)
Ch. 9 Mitigating Evidence — Lockett v. Ohio (1978);
Ch. 10 Jury Unanimity on Mitigating Evidence — McKoy v. North Carolina (1990)
Ch. 11 Murder Defendants Who Did Not Kill (I) — Enmund v. Florida (1982)
Ch. 12 Murder Defendants Who Did Not Kill (II)—Tison v. Arizona (1987)
Ch. 13 Jurors Opposed to Capital Punishment—Witherspoon v. Illinois (1968)
Ch. 14 Selecting the "Death-Qualified" Jury — Lockhart v. McCree (1986)
Ch. 15 Selecting an Unbiased Jury — Turner v. Murray (1986)
Ch. 16 Victim Impact Evidence — Payne v. Tennessee (1991)
Ch. 17 Jury Instructions On Parole-Ineligibility — Simmons v. South Carolina (1994)
Ch. 18 The Right to Effective Counsel — Burger v. Kemp (1987)
Ch. 19 Capital Sentencing by Judges — Spaziano v. Florida (1984)
Ch. 20 Proportional Sentencing Review — Pulley v. Harris (1984)
Ch. 21 Death Sentences and Double Jeopardy — Arizona v. Rumsey (1984)
Ch. 22 Juveniles May Be Executed — Stanford v. Kentucky (1989)
Ch. 23 Insane Convicts May Not Be Executed — Ford v. Wainwright (1986)
Ch. 24 The Mentally Retarded May Not Be Executed —Atkins v. Virginia (2002)
Ch. 25 Race Discrimination and Capital Punishment — McCleskey v. Kemp (1987)
Ch. 26 "Innocence" And Federal Habeas Corpus — Herrera v. Collins (1993)
Appendix A: Facts and Figures on Murder and the Death Penalty
Appendix B: Selected Death Penalty Statutes

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